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Old 11-23-2008, 08:05 AM   #21
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Just like cucumbers, they're dipped in wax in order to prevent moisture loss. Not being the most popular of vegetables (for reasons that are beyond me), they don't exactly jump off the shelves into grocery carts, so the longer the market can keep them looking well, the more likely they are to eventually sell them instead of having to toss them.
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Old 11-23-2008, 04:09 PM   #22
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My mother used to mash them along with carrots and potatoes then fry it in a pan, flip it over like you would for hash. We actually called it hash.
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Old 11-23-2008, 10:23 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by licia View Post
We really like cooked rutabagas, but I'm never sure just what to serve with them.
Rutabagas are slightly sweet, but with a perfect balance between sweet and savory. They are a natural to serve alongside savory mashed potatoes and any kind of savory meat with gravy. They balance the flavor profile of the plate. This is also why they are so good in totiere, pasties, and the above mentioned hash. Again, I like to add just a touch of brown sugar, butter, and finely ground black pepper to accentuate the natural flavor of the rutabaga. I used to think that after the dressing, my favorite side at Thanksgiving was the sweet potato. But I have since changed my mind. Yes I love a moist and juicy turkey, and the dressing is still my favorite side. But after the dressing, rutabaga is king. I would almost say that rutabagas are better than acorn squash, and I love acorn squash. The flavor is complex, a cross between turnip, radish, & cabbage. It's just plain deliscious.

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Old 11-24-2008, 12:30 AM   #24
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I cube rutabaga, boil and then mash with butter and salt. My sister also makes home made onion rings (like the French's ones in a can) and adds them to the top which adds a little texture. I LOVE RUTABAGA. Just wish it wasn't so hard to cut up! :-)
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Old 11-24-2008, 12:05 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Goodweed of the North View Post
Rutabagas are slightly sweet, but with a perfect balance between sweet and savory. They are a natural to serve alongside savory mashed potatoes and any kind of savory meat with gravy. They balance the flavor profile of the plate. This is also why they are so good in totiere, pasties, and the above mentioned hash. Again, I like to add just a touch of brown sugar, butter, and finely ground black pepper to accentuate the natural flavor of the rutabaga. I used to think that after the dressing, my favorite side at Thanksgiving was the sweet potato. But I have since changed my mind. Yes I love a moist and juicy turkey, and the dressing is still my favorite side. But after the dressing, rutabaga is king. I would almost say that rutabagas are better than acorn squash, and I love acorn squash. The flavor is complex, a cross between turnip, radish, & cabbage. It's just plain deliscious.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
My family feels the same way you do. Must be a "Michigan thing." Dressing first, the rutabaga a close second. I bought 9 of them yesterday for 7 people. There won't be a bit left.
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Old 11-24-2008, 12:50 PM   #26
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they are often called waxed turnips down here. They have a beautiful golden color, are sweeter than a white turnip, great raw, or cooked, they love to be mashed with potatoes, they are great roasted with parsnips around the meat or bird, do well in soups and stews, are wonderful roasted together with other root veg with olive oil s & p and thyme. (a real hit at a dinner party recently...people couldn't get enough and had always been afraid of these critters!)

I'm glad to see so many replies to the thread. These veg are sooooo good and versatile and so overlooked. and yes are perfect in pasties! meat potato onion rutabaga salt pepper dough ... meant to be together!!
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