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Old 10-29-2018, 04:47 PM   #31
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I dint care what anybody says, I hate kale, almost as much as tripe.

Russ
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Old 10-30-2018, 12:44 PM   #32
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Kale was always cattle feed when I was a girl. Vile stuff (and it's the only brassica I dislike!!).


Just another thing that chefs who want to make a name for themselves force on to the gullible.


I liked tripe when I was little (the white honey-comb variety with vinegar and pepper) but when I was a student I had a vacation job as cook in an old people's home and they loved it. The smell of a bucketful of enough tripe for 40 people sitting on the table in my kitchen was enough to make me heave and put me off tripe forever.
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Old 10-30-2018, 01:00 PM   #33
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I wanted to highlight this key paragraph (she also mentions kale in this article).

"I love blueberries, wild and cultivated, but they are a fruit like any other. Their antioxidants may counteract the damaging actions of oxidizing agents (free radicals) in the body, but studies of how well antioxidants protect against disease yield results that are annoyingly inconsistent. When tested, antioxidant supplements have not been shown to reduce disease risk and sometimes have been shown to cause harm. The USDA no longer publishes data on food antioxidant levels “due to mounting evidence that the values indicating antioxidant capacity have no relevance to the effects of specific bioactive compounds, including polyphenols on human health.” The U.S. National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health at the NIH judges antioxidants as having no special benefits. People who eat more fruits and vegetables have less risk of chronic disease, but nobody really knows whether this is because of antioxidants, other food components, or other lifestyle choices."
Another in a long history of "Eat this, it's good for you" followed later by evidence that it doesn't really do what you thought it did.

I continue trudging along eating what I like simply because it tastes good.
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Old 10-30-2018, 01:14 PM   #34
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Another in a long history of "Eat this, it's good for you" followed later by evidence that it doesn't really do what you thought it did.

I continue trudging along eating what I like simply because it tastes good.
Exactly.
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Old 10-30-2018, 02:59 PM   #35
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I got interested in kale because it's traditional in some Danish recipes.
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Old 10-30-2018, 05:51 PM   #36
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I dint care what anybody says, I hate kale, almost as much as tripe.

Russ
I am with you on both of those items!
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Old 10-31-2018, 06:57 PM   #37
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Just tried baby kale and wasn't bitter at all. A little stemmy ( Which I dont mind), but at least I can make it edible at home, even though, the one i had in the restaurant didnt look like it was baby kale, had a lot of curl to it.
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Old 10-31-2018, 07:12 PM   #38
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Every time I eat restaurant prepared kale it always tasted really good. When i try to do the same at home, it is always bitter.

over the past week + Ive had kale at 3 different restaurants and no bitterness at all. All were simply prepared ( Im guessing garlic, olive oil, a little soy sauce). Not sure of the kale was sautéed , pre boiled or steamed.
In all cases it was cut or almost copped to relatively small pieces.
In one case, shiitake mushrooms were added to the mix.

Is there a specific variety , or cooking technique that makes it less bitter?

I'm betting the bitterness is a combo of cooking technique and soy sauce.

I love kale and here's how I fix it:

In a skillet I use a little oil or butter and add the washed kale, and sizzle it just a little to reduce volume. Add chopped garlic near the end of this process if you desire but do nut allow garlic to brown. Next I add a little water and clap a lid on to steam for about 10 minutes - less time for younger kale. Not much water ... I want the kale to be mostly dry at the end.

Once kale is softened remove lid allowing water to steam off. Salt and pepper and add other seasoning and squeeze of lemon. serve immediately.

If you sear soy sauce it can become bitter - always add after cooking
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Old 10-31-2018, 07:37 PM   #39
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Don't sear soy sauce? Do you mean burn? Burning almost anything will make it bitter, but 1.3 billion Chinese folks who cook in woks over very high heat can't have been wrong for thousands of years.
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Old 10-31-2018, 08:02 PM   #40
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Don't sear soy sauce? Do you mean burn? Burning almost anything will make it bitter, but 1.3 billion Chinese folks who cook in woks over very high heat can't have been wrong for thousands of years.
I really enjoy taking some cooked brown rice and adding tamari soy sauce and lots of sesame seeds and frying it up. I think it's much tastier when the soy goes on before it's fried.
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