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Old 04-19-2005, 03:16 PM   #11
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As in "Slap ya mama", cantcook?

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Old 04-19-2005, 03:25 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by cantcook
A good crawfish eggplant stuffing in a mirliton will make you slap somebody!
I'm making a triple batch right now!!


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Old 04-20-2005, 07:24 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by mudbug
As in "Slap ya mama", cantcook?

Similar, but if she ain't around you still gotta slap somebody!!
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Old 04-20-2005, 07:53 AM   #14
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A member of the cucurbit or gourd family, mirlitons are related to cucumbers, summer and winter squash, melons and pumpkins. They are easy to grow, and will thrive just about anywhere the vines find support and plenty of sun.
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Old 04-20-2005, 07:55 AM   #15
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4 good-sized mirlitons, cut in half lengthwise
1 tablespoon butter, plus extra for greasing the pan
1/2 pound shrimp, chopped
1/2 pound smoked ham, chopped
3/4 teaspoon salt
4 cloves garlic, chopped fine
1-1/2 teaspoons paprika
1 large pinch each oregano, thyme, cayenne pepper and freshly ground black pepper
1/2 cup evaporated milk
1/2 cup green onions (scallions), chopped
1/2 cup yellow onion, chopped fine
About 1 cup bread crumbs
1 cup shrimp stock, fish stock or water
In a large pot, boil the mirlitons in water to cover for 1/2 hour, or until soft. Drain the water and set them aside to cool. While they're cooling, heat your oven to 350F and grease a 8 inch square baking dish with butter.
When the mirlitons have cooled, scoop out the seeds carefully and discard them. Then scoop out the "meat", leaving about 1/4" all around. Chop the "meat" and put it in a bowl, setting the mirliton shells aside.

Melt the butter in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the shrimp, ham, garlic and seasonings. Cook for 5 minutes, stirring frequently. Add the mirliton "meat", milk, onion, green onion, and 1/2 cup of the bread crumbs. Cook for 5 more minutes, stirring well. Remove the skillet from the heat and spoon the mixture into the mirliton shells. Top each of the filled shells with about 1 tablespoon of the bread crumbs.

Put the mirlitons in the baking dish and carefully pour the stock into the dish around them.

Bake, uncovered for 1/2 an hour. Eat and enjoy.
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Old 04-20-2005, 08:00 AM   #16
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Patty Pan squash

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Old 04-23-2005, 03:23 AM   #17
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You know you're talking mild flavor when zucchini are stronger than merlitons. I loved them stuffed. Ever been to Lagniappe Too (or is it Two? Don't remember). But it is such a mild flavor that when given a bunch of them, I just chop them up and stick them in any soup I happened to be making. Aren't they also called Alligator Pears?
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Old 04-24-2005, 11:07 AM   #18
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Pears and pork go together beautifully. I braise thick pork chops with pears and white wine - yum. To be sure, pears aren't a substitute for merlitons/christopenes/chayotes/chochos but pears do complement pork.
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Old 04-24-2005, 01:03 PM   #19
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Moved to the vegetable/vegetarian forum
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Old 04-24-2005, 02:11 PM   #20
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LOL, I had to think what Merlitons are! Chayote is what I find them as here in California but I was introduced to them as Gater Pares. If you see one floating in the water it looks just like a gator poking it's snout above water.

They are great for stuffing and as a filler, it takes on other flavors easy. For a salad or other foods where you need a little flavor try jicama's sweet/nutty flavor. Jicama is a great sub for water chestnuts too.

I learned early in life that a job in the kitchen meant food in the belly
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