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Old 04-12-2012, 05:13 AM   #11
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Here we go with the frittata with lampascioni.

Ingredients
300 kg lampascioni
4 eggs
70 g hot salami
2 tablespoons grated pecorino cheese
2 tablespoons olive oil
Wine vinegar
Salt
Black pepper, grounded

The preparation of the bulbs is the same as for the Lampascioni in oil:
Clean the lampascioni, peel them and cut a cross at the bottom after removing the root. Cover them with water in a bowl for a couple of hours; once in a while change the water. Boil them in water with added salt and vinegar (2 parts vinegar, 1 part water), till they are tender. Drain, dry and let them cool down.

For the frittata:
SautÚ the lampascioni in a pan with the some olive oil on low fire, about 10 minutes, crushing them with a wooden spoon. Whisk your eggs with salt, pepper, pecorino and diced salami. Add lampascioni and cook the frittata on both sides in a pan with oil, on medium/high fire.

Here you find some beautiful photographs, which show you how to properly prepare lampascioni (cleaning, cutting etc.) for this frittata:

PomodoroRosso Ricette FRITTATA DI LAMPASCIONI
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Old 04-12-2012, 07:17 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Luca Lazzari View Post
Here we go with the frittata with lampascioni.

Ingredients
300 kg lampascioni
4 eggs
70 g hot salami
2 tablespoons grated pecorino cheese
2 tablespoons olive oil
Wine vinegar
Salt
Black pepper, grounded

The preparation of the bulbs is the same as for the Lampascioni in oil:
Clean the lampascioni, peel them and cut a cross at the bottom after removing the root. Cover them with water in a bowl for a couple of hours; once in a while change the water. Boil them in water with added salt and vinegar (2 parts vinegar, 1 part water), till they are tender. Drain, dry and let them cool down.

For the frittata:
SautÚ the lampascioni in a pan with the some olive oil on low fire, about 10 minutes, crushing them with a wooden spoon. Whisk your eggs with salt, pepper, pecorino and diced salami. Add lampascioni and cook the frittata on both sides in a pan with oil, on medium/high fire.

Here you find some beautiful photographs, which show you how to properly prepare lampascioni (cleaning, cutting etc.) for this frittata:

PomodoroRosso Ricette FRITTATA DI LAMPASCIONI
Many thanks again Luca. Nice set of fotos.
┐'in water with added salt' = una padella dell'acqua senza sale?
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Old 04-12-2012, 07:38 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by justplainbill View Post
Many thanks again Luca. Nice set of fotos.
┐'in water with added salt' = una padella dell'acqua senza sale?
This post of mine wasn't checked by Gabriella...

I just mean that you need to add some salt to the water/vinegar mixture, in the pot in which you boil your lampascioni.

WARNING: This post, too, has not been checked by Gabriella
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Old 04-12-2012, 09:01 AM   #14
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Okay. I'm interested. It seems I should be able to grow it here, and I see bulbs available in the cultivar 'Monstrosum' or 'Plumosum'. Now, that cultivar is not considered "invasive," meaning it doesn't divide as vigorously as the regular. I'm not yet seeing bulbs of the wild version being offered.
For my purposes, the more invasive the better .
They can be planted from seed in the spring and from bulbs in the fall but do not seem to be commonly available.
I'm a fan of edible perennials and would like to establish a stable of perennials that can be harvested throughout as much of the year as possible
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Old 04-12-2012, 11:51 AM   #15
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GLC,

There is also a stunner spring onion called C A L C O T S which are predominate in Spring in the Barcelona and Girona provinces of Catalonia ... They are lovely too ...
Good luck with your farming ...
Margi.
This year, I planted these:



Red torpedo onions here. I suppose Cipolla rossa di Tropea there. I'll be interested to see how they do, but they're growing vigorously already.

Next fall, I also want some fat spring onions of the calcot type. It sounds like they need the same sort of treatment as leeks, adding earth as they grow to get them large and fat. And a sweet red pepper of the dulce de Espana or dulce mediterraneo type.
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Old 04-12-2012, 01:50 PM   #16
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@ GLC,

Gorgeous " magenta " onion variety ... Thanks so much for posting photo !

I believe that we are having a bit of a confusion ...

There are 2 types of Onion Varieties ...

1st: is the Italian variety that Luca had given a recipe for and this onion is a violet lavendar variety ... Though, there is a Puglian ( Apulian GREEN variety which looks like a thick long green stem, with 1 round ball ) !

2nd: CATALONIA on the Iberian Peninsula, has a gorgeous Green Onion variety that is called CALCOT ( pronounced CAL SOT ) and the description is same as above --- a 1 oval ball shaped onion on a thick stem.

I am uncertain if the LATIN genre is same or not --- over wkend, when I have more time, perhaps I can check ...

Thanks so much for posting photo !

How do you prepare these GLC ? Roast, Evoo and sea salt ...

Margi.
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Old 04-12-2012, 01:51 PM   #17
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@ Luca, Ciao,

What a lovely way to make a Frittata ... Thanks for posting ...
Have nice wkend,
Margi.
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Old 04-12-2012, 02:43 PM   #18
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I understand. The lampascione is made from wild hyacinth bulbs.

I gather that the calcot isn't so much a separate variety of spring onion but is created by special handling by replanting developed white onion in a trench and keeping soil mounded up on them, much like leeks, for the same purpose of creating more white leaves.

I which the photo was of mine. Mine are still in the ground. They are something of an experiment to see if they will do well here and in this soil, but so far, they seem healthy.

Edible bulbs are interesting, especially those that aren't alliums (onions, leeks, garlic). Here, there's one called Camassia quamash that I haven't tasted.




Cooking converts its starch to sugar, and it's said to be like sweet chestnuts. I have a source for bulbs and may try them. They were a Native American staple.
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Old 04-12-2012, 05:16 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by Margi Cintrano View Post
@ Luca, Ciao,

What a lovely way to make a Frittata ... Thanks for posting ...
Have nice wkend,
Margi.
Thanks Margi. Today I strictly followed the frittata guidelines of chef Walter Pedrazzi, on april issue of La Cucina Italiana to make my first proper and beautiful frittata! I've never been a frittata lover, but this new technique could open a new egg age for me.

Ciao
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Old 04-12-2012, 05:21 PM   #20
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Consider giving it a try with fresh duck (Pekin) eggs .
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