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Old 08-17-2007, 02:53 PM   #11
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Constance, if the humidity is high in your house, you may have trouble with molding. But with AC on, mushrooms dry pretty quickly.
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Old 08-17-2007, 06:53 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by sparrowgrass
The other way to deal with mushrooms is to dry them.

Just lay them out on a paper towel on the counter, and in a few days, they will be dry. If they are particularly large, slice them up. Don't wash them first.

I store mine in the freezer, but if they are thoroughly, crispy dry, you could put them in a mason jar and store them in the cupboard.

When you get ready to use them, soak in warm water. Drying makes plain old button mushrooms chewier, more "meaty" and seems to intensify the flavor.
Sparrowgrass,
I have a large bag of dried porcini's, and learned the hard way to add several bay leaves and a hand full of peppercorns to the container they are in...My first bag went into the garbage as those nasty little bugs got into the mushrooms and I ended up with $$$ wasted..I've been wanting to dry some myself but haven't because of the bugs. When I bought these, the lady who owns this little Italian Deli told me to add the peppercorns and bay leaves..These mushrooms have lasted over 6 months with no little beasties getting in the container. What do you do? Also, do you save the soaking water to use in your pasta sauce or the recipe your making? I have a dehydrater and wonder if they will dry well that way or to just do as you do? Which sounds like a great way to work with them.
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Old 08-17-2007, 07:10 PM   #13
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Sparrowgrass, we have central AC, and I keep the house around 70 degrees, so molding shouldn't be a problem.

Kadesma, your dehydrater will probably do the best job.
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Old 08-20-2007, 11:44 AM   #14
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What Constance said. If I had a dehydrator, I would certainly use it.

I put mine in the freezer after they are dry--no bugs in there.

Yep, I save the soaking water, if I soak them. Be careful, because it may be gritty--leave the last bit in the soaking vessel..

If I am making soup or sauce, I rinse them briefly and add them to the liquid without soaking.
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Old 08-20-2007, 12:04 PM   #15
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Thanks Sparrowgrass, I am now going to give the dehydrator a go and see what happens. I drain my mushroom water through several layers of cheese cloth.
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Old 08-20-2007, 12:34 PM   #16
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When I soak dry mushrooms (which I do frequently for Asian dishes - all those dried shitakes & wood ears), if I plan on saving the soaking the liquid, I drain the mushrooms thru a kitchen strainer lined with a plain old paper coffee filter. Although it does take a while to drain, it works great - absolutely no grit, etc., gets thru into the strained broth.

In fact, I use paper coffee filters often for filtering impurities out of broth/stock.
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Old 08-20-2007, 12:42 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BreezyCooking View Post
When I soak dry mushrooms (which I do frequently for Asian dishes - all those dried shitakes & wood ears), if I plan on saving the soaking the liquid, I drain the mushrooms thru a kitchen strainer lined with a plain old paper coffee filter. Although it does take a while to drain, it works great - absolutely no grit, etc., gets thru into the strained broth.

In fact, I use paper coffee filters often for filtering impurities out of broth/stock.

I used to do that too but was too impatient to wait for the long filtration process. Try paper towel as a filter. It traps all the sediment and the liquid moves through faster.
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Old 08-25-2007, 05:04 PM   #18
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We dry our mushrooms, too. My husband actually picks them himself, morelles and chanterelles. Don't panic, he's done it since he was a child, and he's 44 now. He first started learning about mushrooms from his uncle in Vermont. Now it's an obsession with him, he has every book on the subject and can identify mushrooms on the spot. There are actually quite a few mushroom hunters around here, it upsets him to no one to head to his favorite spots and see someone has beaten him to the mushrooms.

But yes, we either air dry them, or in the dehydrator.
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