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Old 08-20-2018, 06:44 PM   #1
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Lightbulb My Most Kidney Friendly French Fries

Potatoes are high in potassium, which is not good for a CKD diet. To use potatoes, I have to either slice and soak in water for three or so hours, or double boil the to leach out the potassium.

The other night, DW was hungry for french fries. I had both russets, and yukon gold potatoes in the house. I peeled, then sliced the yukon golds into thigh steak fries and boiled them in water until cooked. I drained them and brought them again to a boil and let them cook for five more minutes. I had a heavy cast iron pan half filled with oil over medium-high heat are ready to fry. I used my spider to remove the cooked potatoes from the water, drip-dry, and transfer to the hot oil. Fried until lightly browned and drained on paper towels when done, and lightly salted them.

The potatoes were crispy on the outside, and creamy/fluffy on the inside. They had an amazing texture and full potato flavor. They were among my best french fries ever.

Two nights later, for comparison, I used the exact same cooking method, but with the russet potatoes. They were still good, but not as good as with the Yukon Gold potatoes.

Everything I have ever read about the perfect french fries has said to use russets, blanch them in hot oil, chill them, then fry until golden brown. I have used that method for years. This boil, then fry method has been my go-to method now for about 2 years as it really does produce a superior french fry.

I believe than boiling the potatoes removes much of the starch, while preserving the moisture of the potato. This causes the moisture to steam out when the hot oil hits the potato surface, keeping the french fry from absorbing the cooking oil. It is already cooked on the inside, so you only have to lightly brown the potato on the outside, making it crisp, yet tender. Plus, a good amount of potassium is removed from the potato, making it healthier for those with poor kidney function.

And again, I have heard it stated that russets make the best mashed potatoes. And again, twice boiled Yukon Golds give me a superior result.

My best uses for russets is mashed potatoes in the skin, and potato salad.

For a nifty way to impress your crew, bake one large russet potato per person until tender all the way through. Do not bake in foil as you need that baked skin, not a steamed skin. Cut the potato across its width, into two, equal halves. Turn the potato so that the cut portion points at the ceiling and place a full tsp. of butter on the potato flesh. Stab this into the potato flesh with a fork until the butter is fully incorporated. Add a tbs. of milk to the potato and stir inside the skin to make smooth and very buttery mashed potatoes. Season according to taste. These are kind of fancy, yet country at the same time. And, your guests can make their own, once you demonstrate.

Enjoy your spuds, and no potato skins for CKD diets.

Seeeeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North

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Old 08-20-2018, 10:41 PM   #2
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Please be careful. It makes me really nervous to hear you are eating potatoes. I love you GW and want you to be around for a long while.
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recipe, oil, potatoes, salt, water

My Most Kidney Friendly French Fries Potatoes are high in potassium, which is not good for a CKD diet. To use potatoes, I have to either slice and soak in water for three or so hours, or double boil the to leach out the potassium. The other night, DW was hungry for french fries. I had both russets, and yukon gold potatoes in the house. I peeled, then sliced the yukon golds into thigh steak fries and boiled them in water until cooked. I drained them and brought them again to a boil and let them cook for five more minutes. I had a heavy cast iron pan half filled with oil over medium-high heat are ready to fry. I used my spider to remove the cooked potatoes from the water, drip-dry, and transfer to the hot oil. Fried until lightly browned and drained on paper towels when done, and lightly salted them. The potatoes were crispy on the outside, and creamy/fluffy on the inside. They had an amazing texture and full potato flavor. They were among my best french fries ever. Two nights later, for comparison, I used the exact same cooking method, but with the russet potatoes. They were still good, but not as good as with the Yukon Gold potatoes. Everything I have ever read about the perfect french fries has said to use russets, blanch them in hot oil, chill them, then fry until golden brown. I have used that method for years. This boil, then fry method has been my go-to method now for about 2 years as it really does produce a superior french fry. I believe than boiling the potatoes removes much of the starch, while preserving the moisture of the potato. This causes the moisture to steam out when the hot oil hits the potato surface, keeping the french fry from absorbing the cooking oil. It is already cooked on the inside, so you only have to lightly brown the potato on the outside, making it crisp, yet tender. Plus, a good amount of potassium is removed from the potato, making it healthier for those with poor kidney function. And again, I have heard it stated that russets make the best mashed potatoes. And again, twice boiled Yukon Golds give me a superior result. My best uses for russets is mashed potatoes in the skin, and potato salad. For a nifty way to impress your crew, bake one large russet potato per person until tender all the way through. Do not bake in foil as you need that baked skin, not a steamed skin. Cut the potato across its width, into two, equal halves. Turn the potato so that the cut portion points at the ceiling and place a full tsp. of butter on the potato flesh. Stab this into the potato flesh with a fork until the butter is fully incorporated. Add a tbs. of milk to the potato and stir inside the skin to make smooth and very buttery mashed potatoes. Season according to taste. These are kind of fancy, yet country at the same time. And, your guests can make their own, once you demonstrate. Enjoy your spuds, and no potato skins for CKD diets.:ohmy: Seeeeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North 3 stars 1 reviews
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