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Old 05-24-2015, 12:34 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Caslon View Post
Yes, I use that method when, after boiling potatoes, I discover there's no milk in the fridge.
Mashed potatoes without butter and milk:

Garlic Mashed Potatoes
Ingredients:

2 pounds of new potatoes
¼ cup pecorino cheese, grated
2 tsp garlic, minced
4 Tbs Extra Virgin olive oil
2 Tbs vegetable broth
Salt and ground black pepper
Instructions:

Place the potatoes in a large pot and add enough water to cover them by 2 inches. Boil the potatoes for about 15 minutes, until a paring knife inserted into a potato meets no resistance. Drain the potatoes, then squeeze them through a potato ricer into a bowl, discarding the skin.
Add the garlic, grated cheese, olive oil and broth to the potatoes and stir until combined. Season with salt and pepper to taste.
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Old 05-24-2015, 12:48 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sir_Loin_of_Beef View Post
Mashed potatoes without butter and milk:

Garlic Mashed Potatoes
Ingredients:

2 pounds of new potatoes
¼ cup pecorino cheese, grated
2 tsp garlic, minced
4 Tbs Extra Virgin olive oil
2 Tbs vegetable broth
Salt and ground black pepper
Instructions:

Place the potatoes in a large pot and add enough water to cover them by 2 inches. Boil the potatoes for about 15 minutes, until a paring knife inserted into a potato meets no resistance. Drain the potatoes, then squeeze them through a potato ricer into a bowl, discarding the skin.
Add the garlic, grated cheese, olive oil and broth to the potatoes and stir until combined. Season with salt and pepper to taste.
One of the things I do when boiling potatoes or even pasta, is toss an unpeel clove of garlic (or even two or more, depends on size) into the cooking water. It flavors the potatoes or pasta without that raw taste of garlic. I also will toss a couple of cloves into the micro to kill that raw taste when I am using them to flavor olive oil for dipping. The cloves stay in the heated warm oil.

Every so often I will get a bulb of garlic that is very strong. Eating raw garlic is not my favorite dish.
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Old 05-24-2015, 08:29 PM   #23
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I have my big container of buttermilk powder. It's good for another year according to the label. So what if I keep it a year after the date code.

Experts in the field (?) are now saying we can keep our foods way after the expiration date. I've got containers of salad dressing that I should throw away according to the "Use by" date. I'm ignoring that lately.
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Old 05-24-2015, 08:32 PM   #24
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Novel Way to Make Smashed Spuds

I found out too late that after I opened my buttermilk powder, it needs to be kept in the fridge! Mine was on top of the fridge in a basket for several years, along with the dried beans. Who knew?
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Old 05-24-2015, 09:13 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by Dawgluver View Post
I found out too late that after I opened my buttermilk powder, it needs to be kept in the fridge!
In ya go, plastic container of buttermilk powder.

Speaking of powdered procucts, I recently bought a container of Argo Corn Starch. There was no expiration date on the label. The label was falling off so I removed it. Only then could I read the expiration date underneath that label! I found out it was about expired. How dare Argo print the expiration date on the container underneath the paper label which happened to come loose!
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Old 05-24-2015, 09:34 PM   #26
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Well that would be irritating, Caslon. Grrrr....

I just wrote powdered buttermilk on my shopping list. I used to buy it all the time years ago, but somewhere along the line I forgot about it. I know about the mixing of an acid into milk, but the powdered canister mix is easier. I liked the flavor, too.
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Old 05-24-2015, 09:38 PM   #27
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Methinks this is no longer about different ways of smashing spuds. Oh how guilty I am of hijacking threads. Glad to see I'm not the only one. I'm in very good company it seems.

Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 05-24-2015, 10:22 PM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Caslon View Post
I have my big container of buttermilk powder. It's good for another year according to the label. So what if I keep it a year after the date code.

Experts in the field (?) are now saying we can keep our foods way after the expiration date. I've got containers of salad dressing that I should throw away according to the "Use by" date. I'm ignoring that lately.
Caslon, many years ago housewives were raising a stink about some products going bad. They wanted a system of knowing when a food was about to turn on them. So the food industry came up with the system now in place. "Oh boy! We can increase our sales by giving them a short expiration date!" They got carried away when they started to expire date detergent. By then America's housewives were on to the game plan. They extended the expiration dates to a more reasonable date. And the expiration date for detergent came off the packages. Not all products require an expiration date. But they are there anyway. We as purchasers now don't trust any food product that doesn't have one. The only time you have to be really, really concerned is when you buy a canned good where the top of the can is swollen. If you find one on the shelf at your favorite store, turn it in to the manager immediately. And if you find one in your pantry, don't open it. Just get rid of it as fast as you can.

Use your own judgment when it comes to expiration dates. With a little amount of intelligence, anyone can tell when a product has gone bad when opened and takes a close look.
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Old 05-24-2015, 10:50 PM   #29
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Printing the expiration date on the ARGO corn starch plastic container... under the label, there's something unfair/illegal about that. Only after the label peeled off was I able to see the date code printed on the container, and it was out of date...newly bought.
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butter, milk, potato, recipe, salt

Novel Way to Make Smashed Spuds I have a unique way of making mashed potatoes that leaves me with richer flavor. Background: when mashed potatoes are made from boiled potatoes, you lose some of flavor as the skin is removed, and the water leeches away some of the potato flesh flavor. Plus, nutrients are lost. So, I was in search of a better mashed potato. I know what you're thinking, just mash them with the skins on. But here's the problem with that, I like my mashed potato creamy smooth, and buttery. Mashed potatoes with the skins on just doesn't seem liek the best method to me. Here's my solution, and it helps with portion control too: Bake, or microwave one medium potato for each person. Cut the cooked potato in half, sideways. Hold hot spud half with a clean pot holder. Stab little holes through the flesh, but not through the skin. Lightly salt the potato flesh if you must, but you don't really need to. Now put a tsp. of real butter on the flesh and stab into the potato until it's absorbed. Slowly place a tbs. of milk on top of the potato flesh until it sinks in. Carefully mix inside the skin with the fork. Add a little more milk if required. REpeat with the 2nd half of the potato. This mashed potato technique gives you silky-smooth mashed potato with rich flavor, plus you get to eat the yummy and nutritions potato skin afterward, or remove the potato flesh and fill the skin with something good and enjoy. This technique seems like a lot of work. However, once you try it, you will find that the end result is worth it, and the time you spend would have taken even more time peeling, boiling, draining, and mashing, and won't be as tasty or as nutritious. Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North 3 stars 1 reviews
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