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Old 06-16-2009, 04:54 PM   #41
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I should post my recipe for Beet Stuffed Zucchini!

Seriously, I love pickled beets, and I love zucchini any way, shape, or form! Did you know that August 10th is "Leave a zucchini on your neighbor's porch day?" You might want to clear some room on your porch before then Scotch!

Barbara
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Old 06-16-2009, 05:29 PM   #42
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1st cycle at school we were given a zucchini practical!
i love the stuff with just butter/seasalt/pepper!

hi!!!!!!!!!!!!barb!!!!
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Old 06-18-2009, 04:25 PM   #43
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I made some very well-received stuffed round zucchini last night. Very quick & impromptu to accompany a baked smoked turkey breast.

I cut the "8-Ball" zucchinis in half lengthwise & gently hollowed them out, leaving a 1/2" shell. Since they were relatively small & seedless, I chopped the innards & sauteed them in some extra-virgin olive oil along with some chopped red bell pepper, garlic, & onion. I then added 2 small handfulls of Pepperidge Farm Herb-Seasoned Stuffing & stirred it around until it had soaked up that fragrant oil. Raised the heat a bit & slowly added dollops of Swanson's Chicken Broth until the stuffing mix was the consistency I wanted - softened, but still firm. NOT soupy. Stuffing was piled into zucchini shells & placed around the smoked turkey breast in a baking dish. Covered the dish snugly with foil & baked for 40 minutes. Uncovered, topped stuffed zucchinis with shredded sharp cheddar cheese, recovered, & baked for an additional 10 minutes.

They turned out wonderful. Cooked through but with shells perfectly tender yet still firm enough not to fall apart. I'll definitely be making this again.
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Old 06-18-2009, 04:43 PM   #44
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Stuffed Zucchini

The big ones are good for stuffing! You slice them in half lenthwise, coat with olive oil, salt and pepper. Place upside down on cookie sheet and bake until almost tender. Then you scrap the goodies out and mix with other ingredients and return to the shell of the squash and bake. YUMMY! I tried Paula Deen's recipe and they are great. Hubby even likes them and he doesn't eat much squash of any kind. Go to foodnetwork.com and search her recipes for Spinach Stuffed Zucchini. It's really...really good!
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Old 06-21-2009, 04:34 PM   #45
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[quote=BreezyCooking;830229]I made some very well-received stuffed round zucchini last night. Very quick & impromptu to accompany a baked smoked turkey breast.

I'm not surprised they were well received. Now I feel hungry
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Old 06-21-2009, 05:54 PM   #46
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In a domestic environment, how about a wood-burning bread oven outdoors? I fancy one of those but will get my partner to build it - the prices charged by companies I've seen on-line are ridiculous.

A while back I read a novel (possibly by Annie Proulx, but I couldn't swear to that) set in a rural area somewhere in North America. The house had two kitchens, one inside the house (used most of the year) and another in a small building of its own for use only in the summer. That way the rest of the house didn't heat up in summer. This intrigued me. Did houses like this really exist?
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Old 06-22-2009, 01:01 AM   #47
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Snoop - yes, many houses in the south had an outdoor kitchen for summer cooking. However, a lot of southern homes had their kitchens detached from the main house anyway. ALL cooking was done separate from the main house.
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Old 06-22-2009, 01:43 AM   #48
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kitchenelf View Post
Snoop - yes, many houses in the south had an outdoor kitchen for summer cooking. However, a lot of southern homes had their kitchens detached from the main house anyway. ALL cooking was done separate from the main house.
all my older aunties had italian kitchens in the basement. they cooked and ate in the basement. they never used the upstairs "company" kitchen, where coffee, tea and dessert was served only to company.
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Old 06-22-2009, 04:20 AM   #49
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Thanks for the info guys. Not sure why my message came up in this thread - should have been in "Kitchen without air conditioning" in General Cooking Questions. I guess I must have had the zucchini thread open while replying and just filled in the wrong box. Still, a question answered is a problem solved. Thanks again.
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Old 06-22-2009, 01:34 PM   #50
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Yes, they were very common, even fairly recently. In the south, a separate kitchen was actually the norm in some places, not just to keep the house cool, but to separate the fire hazard from the rest of the house. Mom, not all that many years ago, kept a convection oven, electric skillet, slow cooker out on the back porch (actually what was called the "Florida room") to help keep the a/c bills down. Even now a fair number of old timers around here have an outside "summer kitchen, " especially if they have large extended families to cook for. So when the heat and humidity hit highs that make even grilling out a chore, you could put some meat and veggies in the pot (what is the other one? A Nesco roaster? Something like that), close the door, and a few hours have a large meal. In that era many men insisted on a hot meat-and-potatoes type meal when they came home from work, no matter if it is 98 degrees with 90+% humidity. This was a good way to provide that hearty meal without dying of heat prostation in the process.
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