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Old 06-06-2006, 03:36 PM   #11
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I came across this making some gumbo one day... it suggested to bake the okra for about 5 to 10 minutes, it dries it up so it is not slimey. However, when doing this, I found the okra to be quite tasty this way...just sprinkle some season salt and bake! Very good and very simple.
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Old 06-06-2006, 04:28 PM   #12
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I love the slime and don't care for fried okra. :) I know, I am weird.
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Old 06-06-2006, 07:38 PM   #13
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I do not like Okra slimy either - different strokes for different folks. I think you got some great ideas and here is another one. It is in line with Indian cuisine so try it only if you like the spices and flavors in that cuisine.

Discard the stem of the okra and split it into half (horizonally lengthwise). Add some oil to a pan (2 tbsp or so, any kind is fine). Keep the heat on low flame so it's not very hot. Add some cumin powder, corrainder powder,red chilli powder, paprika and salt to the oil. Let the spices toast a bit in the oil. Next add the okras and stir them so that the spices are nicely coating the okras.

Let the okras cook with the spices uncovered (they will pan fry nicely). Cook them until the okra is nice and crisp (they will turn a brownish color). Sprinkle with some lime juice and they are ready.

Serve it as a side with anything your heart desires. We normally make this on the side along with Dahl and rice for a delicious and healthy all vegetarian fare- Yummm now I have to make some.
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Old 06-07-2006, 06:35 AM   #14
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That sounds similar to a recipe I make, Yakuta. I can only tolerate 'lady's fingers' (aren't they called Bhindi?) 'in Indian/Pakistani/Bangladeshi food.
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Old 06-07-2006, 07:54 AM   #15
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I am with you Ishbel. I find them pretty slimy and if they are not spiced up and pan fried until crisp and dried I can't eat them . I guess all of us are raised differently with different tastes (some of them acquired and others you learn to love). Yes we call them Bhindi in Hindi (nice rhyme to that )
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Old 06-07-2006, 08:15 AM   #16
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'Indian' food is now considered as British as fish and chips!

Isn't a Bindi also the red mark worn on forehead by some Asian women?
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Old 06-07-2006, 08:52 AM   #17
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Yep the confusion in some languages. Bhindi means okra and the H is stressed and Bindi which used to be the sign of a married woman amongst Hindus but now is a fashion statement for all women in India is where the i is stressed.
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Old 06-07-2006, 09:18 AM   #18
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Thanks for explaining. A bit like US/UK 'I say tomayto, you say tomahhto'
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Old 06-07-2006, 09:37 AM   #19
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Oh yes - I should have added that when my okra plants are producing I also add sliced pods to any & every Indian curry & Asian stir-fry I make!! Absolutely delicious!!
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Old 06-07-2006, 10:37 AM   #20
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I've not actually eaten a lot of okra, but I hope to experiment more in the future. For now, this is probably the best recipe I've made with it.

Okra with Garlic and Dill

4 tbsp of vegetable or chicken stock (homemade if possible)
1 ½ tbsp melted butter (I use unsalted) or olive oil (if olive oil is used this dish becomes vegan)
a pinch of freshly cracked black pepper and salt, to taste (both optional)
3 cloves of garlic, peeled and finely chopped (or however much you prefer)
3 tbsp of fresh green onions (spring onions) or chives, finely chopped (optional)
1 tbsp of fresh dill fawns (feathery leaves), finely chopped
½ pound (225 grams) of fresh or frozen (thaw first) okra pods, cleaned trimmed if required


First preheat your own to 450°F (230° C).

In a large mixing bowl combine the melted butter (or olive oil), vegetable (or chicken) stock, salt & pepper, chopped garlic and green onions (or chives, if using). Stir together and then add in the okra until it's well coated in the butter mixture. Gently fold the delicate dill fawns through the mixture.

Place everything into a medium sized baking dish that has been lightly oiled (or use a non-stick baking dish), and cook for half an hour. Check the okra for tenderness after twenty minutes have elapsed, and every five minutes after that. If your pan of okra seems too dry add a couple of tablespoons of warm stock or water to the dish and continue cooking.

Once done remove from the oven and allow to cool for five minutes before serving. Leftovers will keep, well covered, in the fridge for two or three days, and reheat best in the oven.

Serves 4 as a side dish
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