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Old 06-29-2006, 08:43 PM   #11
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Have you tried making a tian? I've never made one, but as far as I can tell from reading recipes, they are like a vegetably baked custard. Sounds like this might be what you fancy.
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Old 06-29-2006, 08:47 PM   #12
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Just posted a recipe for vegetable tian here: Vegetable Tian

I've never seen a tian that has a custard base in it.
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Old 06-30-2006, 12:27 AM   #13
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I've just been to look for my recipe book with a few tian recipes in it, but I've lent it to someone. I've scouted around the Web and have come across quite a few tian recipes with no eggs in them and only a few with eggs. Interesting. Till I get my book back, here's a delicious-sounding tian with courgette, spinach, rice and eggs:

http://papillonselect.com/prov/preci.htm
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Old 06-30-2006, 05:39 AM   #14
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That's what I love about this cooking stuff - ya learn something all the time!
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Old 09-20-2006, 06:12 AM   #15
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Actually I have a really good traditional Palestinian recipe for you all to try with onions, this recipe is kind of the "made easily" version opposed to making the pita your self, etc. The recipe is called Musakhan.

Take the onions and cut them in slices, sautee them in olive oil, when they start to carmelize (with the help of some sugar), add some sumac, black pepper, salt and some lemon juice, cook some more. Then add this mixture to the top of store bought pita and bake it till it is hot, and make some baked chicken to accompany it, and its pretty delicious.

Here is the recipe I found online:
http://www.jmcc.org/palculture/recipe.htm#musakhan
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Old 09-20-2006, 06:21 AM   #16
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Good afternoon everyone!!

Rickell
That pie sounds delicious.
I know u are asking a question, rather than looking to answer one, but would u please post the onion pie recipe on here. It sounds delicious. And onions are comming to season, in the shops here in Germany. We will soon be able to buy sacks of them, dirt cheaply.
Mel
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Old 09-20-2006, 06:23 AM   #17
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Again Selma, welcome! I had a feeling I was going to enjoy your presence!

Great recipe and great link.

Can you help with the summac/k? Can I assume it's from the summac tree with the reddish, fuzzy berries? Do you get what you're using that way, or does it come prepared in some way?

I'm also wondering about pomegranate juice referenced in a number of Lebanese recipes. I just heard that's the same as grenadine syrup ... do you know if that's correct?
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Old 09-20-2006, 10:30 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ishbel
I cook the pie crust, but then carefully excise the filling away from the crust... I'm not a great pastry lover
Cris made a really tasty savoury cake last winter, filled with onions, mashed potatoes, cheeses, eggs and a little pancetta. All he used was thin dust of bread crumbs on the surface to keep it from sticking to the form, no crusts!! Have you tried anything like that? There would be no waste or unnecessary hassle for making the crust for you, if you are interested I will ask him for the detailed instruction
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Old 09-20-2006, 11:49 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mel!
Good afternoon everyone!!

Rickell
That pie sounds delicious.
I know u are asking a question, rather than looking to answer one, but would u please post the onion pie recipe on here. It sounds delicious. And onions are comming to season, in the shops here in Germany. We will soon be able to buy sacks of them, dirt cheaply.
Mel
Really not a cut and dry recipe I just sorta made it up from what I
had in fridge.

for one pie slice 5 to 6 large onions saute them in butter until
the are translucent.

bake the empty pie shell for about 7 mins
while baking let the onions cool

beat two eggs about 1 and half cups of cream
bit of mustard and any spices you like with onions.
sometimes i will add a bit of wine to the custard mix

put a layer of swiss first in the semi the cooked pie shell
then some onions more cheese then the rest of the
onions pour the custard in the shell more cheese on
top if you like.

put on a cookie sheet bake roughly 35 min to 45 mins
in a 375 degree oven.

sorry everything is not exact i sorta eyeball this recipe
when i make it.

my hubby loves it
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Old 09-20-2006, 04:05 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by Ayrton
Again Selma, welcome! I had a feeling I was going to enjoy your presence!

Great recipe and great link.

Can you help with the summac/k? Can I assume it's from the summac tree with the reddish, fuzzy berries? Do you get what you're using that way, or does it come prepared in some way?

I'm also wondering about pomegranate juice referenced in a number of Lebanese recipes. I just heard that's the same as grenadine syrup ... do you know if that's correct?
Ok, I will try to help you out, summac is this dark purple flakey thing, its sourish in flavor, oh wow, I just looked up what it was, and your right it does grow on a better, hahaha... but the kind I am telling you about looks like pepper flakes but is purple in color.

And pomegranite juice is not like grenadine, its awesome, you gotta try it out, its great in salads, and in dolma's... Its like a thick syrup with a heavy pomegranite flavor... Its great... I have friends in athens, I will have to ask them if they can find it there... Ill keep you posted!
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