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Old 10-13-2005, 01:44 PM   #1
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Organic Tomato Paste

Hey all,
Listen, I just found some Organic Tomato PAste at this quaint, expensive market here in godforsaken florida called The Fresh Market. I could die a happy woman if I could afford to shop here weekly. But, there are some great finds...anyhow, I found some of this paste in a jar, and it is not as thick as the typical canned tomato paste you get in the regular grocer. Once opened is has to be used in 10 days.
My questions are these:
Has anyone had experience with this type of paste?
Can I freeze the remainder in the cube trays in the freezer?
Does it thicken the dish, or create the consistency that Emeril has talked about in the past?

Thanks
B.

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Old 10-13-2005, 01:50 PM   #2
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So sorry about the boys of summer ..... NOT! Heh Heh

I can't answer anything but the freezing ??. I am sure that, like the nonorganic type, it can be successfully frozen.

I don't use the ice cube tray thing, I freeze 1T dollops using glad press and seal. I have also just dolloped them onto regular palstic wrap and frozen. That way you dont have to mess with the ice cube tray.

I am curious as to the answer to the thickening ??

Better luck for both of us in 2006 (well, you up to the ALCS)
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Old 10-13-2005, 02:05 PM   #3
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I only buy organic tomato puree - and have done for the past 10 years or so. I didn't notice that it was any 'thinner' than the regular puree.

I wouldn't keep opened puree for more than 5 days - but then I'm really picky about things, and with the organic tomatoes, I'd be worried that the lack of preservatives etc might have an effect.

I use it to thicken tomato sauces and to add an additional richness to tinned plum tomatoes.
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Old 10-13-2005, 08:08 PM   #4
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I often have an open tube of organic tomato paste in the fridge for a month...I've never encountered any problems at all It' so handy to have about!
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Old 10-13-2005, 08:47 PM   #5
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Re the thickening - do you mean when Emeril adds a little to a soup or whatever and cooks it down? If so, then yes, it will get thicker as you cook it, as the liquid evaporates.

I always use Muir Glen tomato paste - it's so pure and tomatoey!
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Old 10-14-2005, 08:56 AM   #6
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Well, I'm confused now. I know what tomato puree is, and there is a big difference between tomato paste and puree, but frankly, this stuff looks like tomato puree, which is why I am confused as to how to use this stuff. I used to be able to get the tubes of tomato paste, loved it. It was over $1 more than the cans, and had less in it, but it was great, and lasted a long time. Haven't found it out here yet.
So, does puree do the same thing, thicken sauces?? I guess it would when the moisture evaporates, like marmalady said, right?
Tell me, why is the organic stuff so much thinner??
Anyhow, I'll try it when I experiment w/ recipes calling for tomato paste this weekend.
And, hey Red, good luck to us both too. Gotta say it was a great season to know that at our worst, we were still the best in the AL East, at least until...well, I won't go into THAT venting session.
B.
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Old 10-14-2005, 09:57 AM   #7
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In this country, puree and paste are interchangeable terms for exactly the SAME product, depending on which company's products you choose.

I have never noticed that it was thinner than the non-organic stuff.
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Old 10-14-2005, 11:04 AM   #8
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Here puree and paste are two totally difft things. Puree is tomatoes which have been PUREED without much more processing. It's a thick liquid.

Paste has been cooked down and thickened to a paste. It comes in small cans and in toothpaste-type tubes. It's a spreadable solid.

FAN, I can't beleive you can't find tube paste in Seattle. Or is it organic tube paste that you can't find?

Marm -- Muir Glen tastes so much better than regular, but I had a terrible allergic reaction to it once and now am scared to try it again
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Old 10-14-2005, 11:08 AM   #9
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Marm and Jen

I found Muir Glen plum tomatos to be much more acidic than my usual brand of San Marzano tomatos. Have you noticed that as well?
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Old 10-14-2005, 11:35 AM   #10
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Being "organic" isn't the difference. Tomato Paste is nothing more than tomatoes and salt (about 1/2 teaspoon per quart/litre) which are peeled, seeded, chopped and cooked for about an hour, pureed, the salt added, and then cooked and reduced (to remove moisture and concentrate flavors) over 2-3 hours (or more) until it is very thick. I have found over the years that the regular canned stuff in the grocery store (not organic) can vary in consistency from one brand to another.

Having said that - some brands like Contadina do have tomato pastes that have other added ingredients ... there is always going to be an exception to the rule ... which will be noted on the label.

Tomato paste can thicken a sauce - how much will depend on the concentration of the paste to begin with, and the amount added per volume of other liquid.
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