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Old 05-05-2012, 02:26 PM   #21
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I've tried the EVOO and salt, and I liked the skin better without it. The oil results in a more supple skin and I like the skin dry and chewy and crispy.

I often scoop out a large part of the potato and reserve it for some other use. I guess my baked potatoes are trying to become potato skins!
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Old 05-05-2012, 04:22 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by Gourmet Greg View Post
I'm pretty sure nobody eats yam skins. (Or if you care to comment, why not? Maybe some people eat yam skins. I never gave it any thought.)
We eat yam skins in our house. You name it, I love 'em - potato skins, yam skins, sweet potato skins.

They get a good rinse, a few pokes with a fork, tin-foiled and then off to the oven. Tried throwing them in naked once, but decided I liked how the skin turned out when they were wrapped in foil. As far as the tuber stabbing goes, I do it more out of habit than function. My mom did it, so I've always done it.

That being said, I don't usually make yams/sweet potatoes this way. Usually they get chopped up into chunks and baked with regular potatoes (coated in oil and seasoning) or sliced and baked (again, coated in oil and seasoning).

Sure is fun reading everyone's different preferences
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Old 05-05-2012, 04:59 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
I think you're the only one. I bought some russets today, I think I'll give it a try.
I guess I am Andy, I don't use a lot of salt just a little but the evoo I really doctor them up Guess what's on the menu for dinner?
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Old 05-05-2012, 08:44 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vanitas View Post
We eat yam skins in our house. You name it, I love 'em - potato skins, yam skins, sweet potato skins.

They get a good rinse, a few pokes with a fork, tin-foiled and then off to the oven. Tried throwing them in naked once, but decided I liked how the skin turned out when they were wrapped in foil. As far as the tuber stabbing goes, I do it more out of habit than function. My mom did it, so I've always done it.

That being said, I don't usually make yams/sweet potatoes this way. Usually they get chopped up into chunks and baked with regular potatoes (coated in oil and seasoning) or sliced and baked (again, coated in oil and seasoning).

Sure is fun reading everyone's different preferences
I like your ideas. You've inspired me to try the yam skin next time. I've heard for years that much of the nutrient and vitamins are concentrated in the skins (of many vegetables). Perhaps I began enjoying eating potatoes with the skins after eating the popular potato skins appetizer some place. I can't recall my mother ever stating any preference skins vs. no skins.

However it came about I love potatoes with the skins on. I make mashed potatoes via the usual recipes but I don't do anything about the skins except wash them before cooking. I mash them right in and I love the rustic appearance the mashed potatoes get. I think they taste better but I'm biased.

I'll have to try your mixed tuber recipe suggestion, it sounds good. Yes I too enjoy hearing about what different foods, dishes and recipes people enjoy. Sometimes they look good, sometimes not, but it's really nice to get exposed to lots of recipe ideas. Somewhere amongst all those frogs there's bound to be a few princesses!
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Old 05-05-2012, 09:24 PM   #25
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Tis true. Most of the intense nutrients are in the skin. someone once said that the halthiest thn in the kitchen was the sink. We throw more nutrious food and liquids down the drain, than we eat. Think of all the water you cook veggies in and then drain. All the peelings going to the disposal.
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Old 05-05-2012, 09:33 PM   #26
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I avoid boiling vegetables for that reason and because IMO they taste better other ways: (1) microwave with only scant water, (2) steamed, (3) stir-fry, (4) sautéed, (5) baked either bare or in a casserole, (6) grilled (like on a charcoal barbecue or gas grill). Or even (7) raw. Plenty of vegetables that other people cook taste perfectly fine to me raw.
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Old 05-10-2012, 08:52 PM   #27
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The other half of my (garnet) yam was for dinner tonight, already fully cooked, so I nuked it. I didn't wash the skin before initially cooking it, but WTH I have only one body to give to science--and how many humans have died for other humans in our quest to find nutrition for survival in the face of hunger and starvation?

I nuked and buttered and salted it and ate it skin and all, and it was delicious!

Next time I'll scrub the skin like my russet potatoes that I eat skin-on. If I forever disappear from this website in the next 24-36 hours then you'll know the reason for my demise.

But from now on I'll wash and scrub my garnet yam skins and serve them whole when they're done. Good eats!
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recipe, roast

Stab that yam with a fork before you roast it? Is there any reason to stab that yam with a fork before you roast it? The theory is that it lets out steam. Said theory does not explain relative merits of letting or not letting steam out. Maybe my thoughts have become mixed about microwaving a yam (or potato) in order to prevent steam pressure from exploding your tuber. :smile: Roast, as in stick it in a preheated 350° oven for about an hour... And for the record, I'm referring to [I]garnet yams[/I] which are probably more accurately called a type of sweet potato. (Different regions of the world have different names.) It's the one with a dark reddish skin and when cooked has an orange, sweet inside. :yum: I hope we can avoid a philosophical discussion over exactly what constitutes a yam. :smile: For the purposes of this discussion it probably makes little difference what species you're cooking whether yam, potato or sweet potato, other than whether or not you intend to eat the skin. For that matter, is there any reason to do anything to your yam other than put it in the oven? We don't eat the skins--at least [I]I[/I] don't!--so I can't see any real need to even wash it. I know some people wrap their potatoes in aluminum foil, or wash them, oil them... I wash my potatoes because I eat the skin, and don't oil or wrap them because I like the way the skin get without doing that. But yams aren't potatoes. I'm pretty sure nobody eats yam skins. (Or if you care to comment, why not? Maybe some people eat yam skins. I never gave it any thought.) So tonight I stabbed my yam a few times, listlessly. Maybe it helped let out some pent up feelings. Nothing like taking it out on a tuber. :wink: What do you say? Stab it? Wash it? Or just put it in? 3 stars 1 reviews
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