"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Vegetables
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 03-01-2012, 04:49 PM   #1
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,229
Steak Fries

My DW has fallen in love with steak fries. And you know me, I have to make everything from scratch. So the question was, how do you get the fries cooked all the way through without overcooking the outside?

I found through trial and error that parboiling french fries before placing in hot oil give a superior texture to the standard fry, and refry technique. So I just took that a bit further. For steak fries, I cut large russets into 6 to 9 fries, depending on the size of the spud. I then place them in boiling water and cook for about five minutes. This cooks the potato through, without making them too soft to handle if overcooked, they break up when you try to remove them from the water). Place in hot oil and fry until they are just lightly browned. The outer surface is very nicely crisp, while the inside is fluffy, with full potato flavor. This also works with shorter potatoes that aren't just right for making french fries. I simply cube them into 1/4 inch cubes, then follow the same technique. But they are done through in about three minutes instead of 5.

When done, remove to paper towels and salt to your liking.

Give the technique a try and see what you think.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North

__________________

__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2012, 08:27 PM   #2
The Dude Abides
 
TATTRAT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Bermuda Native in D.C./NoVA
Posts: 5,324
Send a message via AIM to TATTRAT Send a message via Yahoo to TATTRAT Send a message via Skype™ to TATTRAT
2 frying sessions.

One at 315-325, just until they are able to be pierced with little resistance, drain and cool, SALT.

THEN fry at 350 until golden, crispy on the outside, fluffy in the middle.

Also, helps to prep the spuds a day in advance, and keep in cold water. helps remove some of the starch, and makes for a better texture in the end.
__________________

__________________
flickr
TATTRAT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2012, 08:35 PM   #3
Ogress Supreme
 
PrincessFiona60's Avatar
Site Administrator
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 36,306
I chill them after boiling, put them in the oil cold from the fridge.
__________________
PrincessFiona60 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2012, 08:57 PM   #4
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Johnstown, Ohio
Posts: 2,525
What TATTRAT said. When it comes to taters, it's all about the par-cooking.

The damn things demand heavy attention, I've never met a potato that could be cooked for less than an hour.
__________________
DampCharcoal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2012, 09:10 PM   #5
The Dude Abides
 
TATTRAT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Bermuda Native in D.C./NoVA
Posts: 5,324
Send a message via AIM to TATTRAT Send a message via Yahoo to TATTRAT Send a message via Skype™ to TATTRAT
Quote:
Originally Posted by DampCharcoal View Post
What TATTRAT said. When it comes to taters, it's all about the par-cooking.

The damn things demand heavy attention, I've never met a potato that could be cooked for less than an hour.
RIP Mitch Hedberg:
It takes forever to cook a baked potato in a conventional oven. Sometimes, I'll just throw one in there, even if I don't want one. By the time it's done, who knows?
__________________
flickr
TATTRAT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2012, 09:22 PM   #6
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: here
Posts: 3,612
Quote:
Originally Posted by TATTRAT View Post
2 frying sessions.

One at 315-325, just until they are able to be pierced with little resistance, drain and cool, SALT.

THEN fry at 350 until golden, crispy on the outside, fluffy in the middle.
That's pretty much the commonly accepted wisdom. I recall learning that from Julia Child's books. IIRC she was describing making potato pillows, but the wisdom is often repeated by all authorities: potato fries have to be fried twice.
__________________
Greg Who Cooks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2012, 09:42 PM   #7
The Dude Abides
 
TATTRAT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Bermuda Native in D.C./NoVA
Posts: 5,324
Send a message via AIM to TATTRAT Send a message via Yahoo to TATTRAT Send a message via Skype™ to TATTRAT
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gourmet Greg View Post
That's pretty much the commonly accepted wisdom. I recall learning that from Julia Child's books. IIRC she was describing making potato pillows, but the wisdom is often repeated by all authorities: potato fries have to be fried twice.

Heaven on Earth



Only maor difference is, a mandolin slice, first fry at 200, and then immediately into 335/350 to initiate the lift, and to set the potato as to not collapse.
__________________
flickr
TATTRAT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2012, 09:45 PM   #8
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: here
Posts: 3,612
Oh yeah potato pillows! I recall these from one of my favorite and now defunct French bistros (here in L.A.). They served them as appetizers to all dinner customers.

I've made them a few times myself, but not with as photogenic results as your image.
__________________
Greg Who Cooks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2012, 09:51 PM   #9
The Dude Abides
 
TATTRAT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Bermuda Native in D.C./NoVA
Posts: 5,324
Send a message via AIM to TATTRAT Send a message via Yahoo to TATTRAT Send a message via Skype™ to TATTRAT
I can't take credit for that shot, all of mine are on the external HD, and not connected to the rig I am currently on, but they were the same. The potato just does wonderful, wonderful things, and is one of my all time faves to work with. My other favorite preparation, is the Hassleback Potato. Makes for a nice presentation, and if you layer in a little shaved garlic, and some cheese(something creamy) at the end, it's a one man marathon of crispy, yet soft potato-y goodness.
__________________
flickr
TATTRAT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2012, 09:51 PM   #10
Executive Chef
 
Rocklobster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Ottawa Valley, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 4,794
Blanch, Blanch, Blanch. I cooked fresh cut fries in my place for years. As said, they need to be done in two stages. First blanch for about 4 minutes at about 325. Then drain and transfer to a container. I would use a cake pan or something like that. They will continue to cook through as they sit there. You can do this about an hour before you need them. Then cook again at 350 for about 5 minutes or however done you like them. I used to blanch about three busbins every morning and put lids on them and refrigerate. You can even refrigerate them and fry them the next day also.
__________________

__________________
Rocklobster is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
other, potatoes, steak

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:19 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.