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Old 11-18-2008, 08:59 AM   #11
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i agree with breezy on the turnips.

I roasted them whole on a bed of salt. they get kidan sweet on there own. then i peel them and slice them and do a nice honey glaze with some butter and what not.

so good.

Okra i havent gotten to use much


eggplant i split in half and roast.

or ill slice it and bread it and fry it.
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Old 11-18-2008, 11:14 AM   #12
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I use turnip in soups. The DW makes a cold layered veggie salad with beets. You could shred some blanched beet and top a potato salad, slaw or greens salad. Wear latex gloves when working with beets, and wear an apron or clothes you don't mind ruining. Eggplant can be prepared many ways. I prefer to grill it or saute it with onion and tomato as a side.

Another "different" veggie thats good is plantain. Google some fried plantain recipes and use them in place of a starch like rice or potato.
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Old 11-18-2008, 11:37 AM   #13
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Okra is actually pretty tasty, although it's easier to eat if someone else prepares it for you the first time, as when you slice it, it does ooze a slimy, snotty looking substance. But it's very tasty when stewed with tomatoes, added to soups, or breaded and fried. Be sure you choose the young, tender pods.

Small to medium sized turnips are good sliced raw and salted for a snack. The flavor is best this time of the year, after hard frost. They can be added to soups and stews, or cooked with butter and brown sugar. Some people also cook them with their greens, onion, a pinch of sugar and a ham hock. If you Google turnip recipes, you will find many...just pick one that sounds good to you. A relative of the turnip, rutabaga, is milder and sweeter.

Beets are wonderful! They taste earthy, but not like dirt. I love the pickled ones best, but they are good any way you serve them.

Eggplant is a relatively new vegetable to me, but I fixed eggplant parmasan last summer and discovered how good it is. The Italians call it poor man's steak, and it is very meaty tasting. Again, Google eggplant recipes and choose one.

A vegetable I haven't tried yet is parsnip. I understand they are very sweet and can be used like carrots.
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Old 11-18-2008, 11:43 AM   #14
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Make sure you get WHITE turnips. Those yellow things some folks call "turnips" and others call "Swede," are really rutabaga, and they're the only veggie I could live forever without.

I love the really small Japanese turnips that come with their greens attached. I slice and saute them with some garlic and sometimes red onions, and when they're all browned and crispy, I toss in the greens and let them wilt. It's SO good!

I could write you a whole book on eggplant. I dearly love it, and prepare it often, in season, in many, many ways, from salads to moussaka. and don't get me started on Baba Ghanouj!
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Old 11-18-2008, 11:53 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Constance View Post
A vegetable I haven't tried yet is parsnip. I understand they are very sweet and can be used like carrots.
They resemble carrots too. I use parsnip in soups too, but not too much to overpower it. They taste great roasted.
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Old 11-18-2008, 12:16 PM   #16
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I could never understand the question "how does it taste?" Everything tastes just like what it is. How do you describe to someone what something tastes like? Food tastes differently to each and every one of us and the way it is prepared makes a ton of difference.

There is no vegetable I haven't eaten. I love them all and I can find a dozen ways to prepare each one to their best advantage. Some of the veggies you say you hate and wouldn't even try are my favorites.

Why not just buy the veggies or whatever, make it the way you think you would like it (there are millions of recipes from this site to Google sites) and see for yourself.

I have a good friend who wouldn't eat a potato if her life depended on it. She hates them. If I had never eaten a potato and asked herto give me a description of what they tasted like, I wouldn't touch them either. See what I mean?

As for rutabaga, my family loves them and so do I. We HAVE to have them every Thankgiving or it just isn't the same. Steamed til they're soft, riced then mixed with butter, salt and pepper. OMG! Different strokes for different folks.

Not everything tastes like chicken.
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Old 11-18-2008, 12:54 PM   #17
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See? This is just what I meant - "Rutabaga" - some can't stand it; others love it. The only way you're ever going to be able to decide for yourself is to TRY IT. And try it different ways.

Once, in a little French bistro type restaurant on the east end of Long Island, we were served a complimentary crudite basket that included some pale orange sticks that we couldn't identify, but that we both loved. Turns out they were raw Rutabaga!! I'd never have guessed, & it gave me one more way to enjoy this veggie besides mashed.
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Old 11-18-2008, 01:58 PM   #18
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I love fried Okra. We call it Georgia Popcorn!
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Old 11-18-2008, 03:46 PM   #19
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IMHO, okra is an essential ingrediet in gumbos (although there are versions made without it). I also like fried okra and stewed okra and tomatoes. I can do without plain stewed okra.
I seldom eat turnips but do use them occaisionally in soups and stews. I love turnips greens. They are a staple in traditional Southern cuisine, usually topped with a little pepper vinegar.

Eggplant is another of my favorites. Search google for recipes. If you like Southern food, a couple to look for are Eggplant Creole and Scalloped Eggplant.

Fresh beets are wonderful, simply peeled and cooked in boiling water like cooking potatoes. They can be eaten warm or chilled and are especially good in salads.
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Old 11-18-2008, 03:55 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FincaPerlitas View Post
IMHO, okra is an essential ingrediet in gumbos (although there are versions made without it).
Fresh beets are wonderful, simply peeled and cooked in boiling water like cooking potatoes. They can be eaten warm or chilled and are especially good in salads.
Okra is essential in gumbo because it acts as a thickening agent for the roux. If you overcook it the okra becomes tough and stringy, and oddly enough, the thickening disappears. You can also use file gumbo a form of okra if you don't want to buy the real thing. Works just as good. It's in the spice section of your supermarket. Pronounced Fillee gumbo.

AND the beets - I have always steamed or boiled beets until I discovered roasting them. Cut all but 1 inch off the bottom root and all but 2 inches of the top, this keeps the color from bleeding. Wash with a stiff brush, don't peel, wrap in aluminum foil and bake at 375 for about 1 hour, more if the beets are large. Cool, then slip the peel off. Slice or dice, salt pepper and butter. That's it. The taste is unbelievable. I will never boil beets again.
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