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Old 11-18-2008, 05:03 PM   #21
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I've never tried roasting beets, but it sounds great. I'll give it a try.
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Old 11-18-2008, 06:37 PM   #22
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Taste is subjective - that's about all I can say about that.

Beets - they are AWESOME roasted!!!! So are turnips, eggplant, Brussels sprouts, shallots, cherry tomatoes, asparagus (I guess I like roasted veggies) To roast, drizzle with a bit of olive oil and a sprinkling of kosher salt.

Also, try pickled beets or search for a recipe on the Internet called Harvard Beets. Very good!
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Old 11-18-2008, 06:53 PM   #23
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Taste is subjective - that's about all I can say about that.

Beets - they are AWESOME roasted!!!! So are turnips, eggplant, Brussels sprouts, shallots, cherry tomatoes, asparagus (I guess I like roasted veggies) To roast, drizzle with a bit of olive oil and a sprinkling of kosher salt.

Also, try pickled beets or search for a recipe on the Internet called Harvard Beets. Very good!
Harvard beets, haven't had those since the 70's. Nobody makes them anymore. I used to love them. Sweet and sour and ooohhh so good. I think I'll make some this week. Thanks for reminding me.
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Old 11-19-2008, 02:00 PM   #24
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Okra is essential in gumbo because it acts as a thickening agent for the roux. If you overcook it the okra becomes tough and stringy, and oddly enough, the thickening disappears. You can also use file gumbo a form of okra if you don't want to buy the real thing. Works just as good. It's in the spice section of your supermarket. Pronounced Fillee gumbo.
Interesting. I thought File gumbo was pronounced Fee lay Gumbo, and it's ground up sassafras. Who knew?
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Old 11-19-2008, 02:13 PM   #25
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Sorry DramaQueen, ChefJune is correct & you are TOTALLY incorrect about the "file" powder frequently used as a thickening agent for gumbo.

It is in NO way shape or form connected to okra. It consists of ground Sassafrass leaves.
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Old 11-19-2008, 02:15 PM   #26
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I also pronounce it FEE lay and, to be precise, it's made from ground sassafras leaves. In the South, Sassafras roots are still used to make tea and were once used to flavor root beer until banned by the FDA as a possible carcinogen and because studies reported that it may cause liver damage. Usually, the term file gumbo is used to refer to the finished gumbo made with file powder.
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Old 11-19-2008, 04:50 PM   #27
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Sorry DramaQueen, ChefJune is correct & you are TOTALLY incorrect about the "file" powder frequently used as a thickening agent for gumbo.

It is in NO way shape or form connected to okra. It consists of ground Sassafrass leaves.
You are right of course, I knew that because I use it in my gumbo recipe. I was concentrating on "okra" and said that in my post instead of sassafrass. Didn't even catch it on the proofread. Sorry. And it DOES thicken gumbo. This from a googled site.


Gumbo File Powder, Powdered Sassafras Leaves


Gumbo file powder is a necessity for cooking authentic Cajun cuisine. Quite simply, gumbo file powder is the powdered leaves of the sassafras tree. When ground, they smell somewhat like eucalyptus or juicy fruit gum.
Long before the use of file powder for Creole and Cajun cooking, American Indians pounded sassafras leaves into a powder and added them to soups and stews. In addition to contributing an unusual flavor, the powder also acts as a thickener when added to liquid.


Everything on Google describing File Gumbo says basically the same thing. By the way, I have never heard it pronounced Filay not even by chefs who recommed it. Not saying it isn't correct, just never hear anyone say it that way. You could be right about that.
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Old 11-19-2008, 06:28 PM   #28
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I don't know which pronounciation is correct, perhaps both, but it reminds me of the great Hank Williams classic song Jambalaya (On The Bayou), later covered by countless other artists. He pronounces it FEE lay.

Take a listen:
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Old 11-20-2008, 03:42 PM   #29
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I don't know which pronounciation is correct, perhaps both, but it reminds me of the great Hank Williams classic song Jambalaya (On The Bayou), later covered by countless other artists. He pronounces it FEE lay.

Take a listen:
version)

Hey, anyway Hank Williams pronounces it is okay with me. I like this version better than Patti Page's. At least I think it was Patti. I'm not so sure about anything anymore.
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Old 11-20-2008, 05:28 PM   #30
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Make sure you get WHITE turnips. Those yellow things some folks call "turnips" and others call "Swede," are really rutabaga, and they're the only veggie I could live forever without.

I love the really small Japanese turnips that come with their greens attached. I slice and saute them with some garlic and sometimes red onions, and when they're all browned and crispy, I toss in the greens and let them wilt. It's SO good!

I could write you a whole book on eggplant. I dearly love it, and prepare it often, in season, in many, many ways, from salads to moussaka. and don't get me started on Baba Ghanouj!
I love rutabaga. It is similar in flavor to turnip, but with the added flavor of cabbage thrown in. But to answer your question;

Turnip is a root veggie that is somewhat starchy in texture when cooked, and much like carrot when raw. The flavor is mildy sweet, reminiscent of radish, but not as strong, and carrot, with peppery overtones. It is rarely bitter.

Ocra, I know nothing about. It's for Southern folks (no disrespect intended), where they get used to them from an early age.

Eggplant, again I am unfamiliar with them. Sorry. I guess the only veggie which you asked about, that I know anything about is turnip. Oh, wait, I know beets.

Like turnips, beets are a root veggie that stores its energy as starches and sugars. They have a complex flavor that is a mixture of sweet and very mild bitterness. they do not taste bitter at all. Beets are complimented by the flavors of nutmeg, allspice, cloves, sugar and vinegar, and onions. When small, beets can be served whole. When larger, they are usually diced or sliced into rounds. Pepper is also great with beets.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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