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Old 01-14-2005, 04:26 PM   #11
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We have them in our grocery store. They look like a beefsteak tomatoe as someone mentioned, and they are "not perfect". They have scars on them basically, much like mine do from my garden I havent tried them yet, but since tomatoes are so expensive now, maybe I will give them a try. The only tomatoes that have any flavor up here in the North of New England are grape tomatoes, and cherry tomatoes. So who knows, maybe ugly tomatoes will be tasty.
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Old 01-14-2005, 11:04 PM   #12
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i don't get it. my tomatoes are totally organic, and come out fine year after year. not a lot of bugs damage the flower or fruit causing marks and bumps, such as is the case with apples, but rather attack the tomato plant itself. aphids are it's worst enemy around here. most marks or bumps on tomatoes are from improper soil and water management, like blossom end rot and problems with cracking.
sounds like an involved scam if you ask me...
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Old 01-14-2005, 11:58 PM   #13
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One more try - I had this all typed up and it booted me off.

Uglyripes are grown in the area I live. They are really the best tasing tomato on the market. They are not scarred or blemished, rather they are 'creased' near the top.

Bucky, it's not a scam. Four hurricanes in 6 weeks wiped out much of the tomato crop here. Naples, where uglis are grown, is just a hop and a skip south of where Hurricane Frances (Cat 5) made landfall. Not many parts of our state were left unscathed this season.

Most of the winter produce for the country comes from Florida and California, so to lose as much crop as we did in such a short span of time has been devastating to both the quality and the price of winter produce.

Just wait until you see the next round of orange juice prices. Three of the four storms hit major inland orange grove areas.
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Old 01-15-2005, 12:02 AM   #14
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One more thought.....

With the torrential rains in California, availability, quality and price of produce are only going to get worse.
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Old 01-15-2005, 07:59 AM   #15
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What ever happened to the "Free Economy" we pride ourselves upon here in the states? Oh...right...it's "Free" unless some council or board, likely poised to derive personal financial gain, decides we consumers don't know how to choose for ourselves...that is to say we risk choosing something that is not what they want us to choose!

This story just chaps my royal laurels, Elf!

And Toomanydawgs, your point is well taken after the tragic weather events in California. Yep. Produce shortages will likely just get worse...or we'll just import some lovely irradiated stuff from way south of the border again. Yet another reason why I grow my own three seasons out of the year!

What a shame.
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Old 01-15-2005, 09:21 AM   #16
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Get active, folks! Tell your supermarkets that you're not going to buy their tasteless tomatoes, and suggest they start carrying 'ugliripes' or - gasp - local tomatoes in season.
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Old 01-15-2005, 09:31 AM   #17
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almost all markets near me offer both the cardboard flavored tomatoes, as well as vine ripened ones. i only buy the vine ripened ones, even though they are almost double the price. like marmalady said, if everyone avoids the gassed tomatoes and they don't sell, the market will be forced to carry the better ones, ugly or not. it shouldn't matter to them so longas they make a profit.

oh, 2manydawgs, i was interrupted when i was typing last night and completely left out something. i meant that the florida "councils" are running the scam. like audeo says, i'm sure to line their own pockets.

just curious, how did the ugli's survive the storms? are they that hardy? if so, i'd think every florida farmer would be growing them next season.
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Old 01-16-2005, 05:26 AM   #18
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I have many "beefs" about the quality of tomatoes. In this country, they can be appalling. What upsets me is the loss of heirloom varieties, and now you either get big red ones, little red ones or plum, and that's it, no differntiation. Unfortunately i have no room here to grow anything (although I am still considering hiring an allotment).

I grew the most gorgeous tomatoes in Australia. My favourites were called Black Russian. When ripe that were a very strange purply greenish blackish red colour (I know - not very attractive) and they had the most amazing flavour, I can't describe it! (I can't even do the colour justice)

There are so many scams amongst supermarkets etc to dominate what we eat. And don't even start me on "organic" vegetables in supermarkets and food miles!!!!!!
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Old 01-16-2005, 07:18 PM   #19
 
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Just a thought on this thread...

We get various types in our grocery stores here in Canada

Through the growing season, local grown are usually on offer, as are USA grown, though the latter are frequently hydroponic, and typically lower quality, as you might expect, as they are grown at a distance, and likely picked green to be "ripened", if you can call it that, with gases, similar to banana's...

Our local roadside stands finish off anywhere between late October and mid November, when we are dependent on USA, Mexican and Chilean produce.

The American produce that we get offered (you guys probably save the best for yourselves!) is pretty much what we locally refer to as "woodies"; the Chliean, when you can get it, is not bad, but hardly an "heirloom" (I'm understanding my beloved "BeefSteaks" to be "heirlooms"? Please correct me and advise what I should be attempting to grow this year!)

Noted that the cluster tomato's, the vine ripes, etc, were selling for $2.99a pound a week ago, but for $3.99 you could get 5 lbs of tomato in a tray pack, from Mexico...I bought the Mexicans, and we are enjoying the heck out of them, near perfect, correct texture, etc...just lacking that extra few days on the vine, and "time-picking" them in the mid-morning, when they've soaked up the previous night's watering and "sugared" that bit from the morning sun...

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Old 02-16-2005, 09:18 AM   #20
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Hubby was in the grocery store with me on Sunday and dragged me over to an ugly ripe tomato display that I'd walked right by. He pointed at it, all excited like a little kid, and said "See! I listen to you!"

Anyway, I bought one and I have to say for a tomato in the middle of the winter, this sucker was delicious! Very meaty and a nice, sweet, real tomato flavor. I sliced it for my quesadilla last night, and as I did it reminded me of slicing a summer tomato from my garden--very meaty throughout--not all liquid and seeds.

They were $1.99/lb at my store. Not a great price, but compared to the standard winter tomato prices this year, I didn't mind paying that much because of the quality.

I'm so glad to know they're being distributed now! Be sure to take a look at your store, too. It will be interesting to see how much the market supports them.
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