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Old 09-18-2006, 07:55 AM   #11
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I often use it as an ingredient in a winter supper gratin dish, or as a side dish with steak or lamb chops.

Gratin with celeriac

1kg root vegetables (celeriac, potato and swede are a good combination), peeled and thinly sliced
Butter for greasing
1 large onion, sliced
125g goat's cheese or any other cheese you fancy, crumbled
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
142ml pot double cream
150ml milk
15g butter
Freshly grated nutmeg

Preheat the oven to gas mk 4/180°C. Layer the root vegetables in a 1.75 litre buttered gratin dish with the onion cheese, seasoning each layer as you go. Finish with a scattering of the cheese.

Mix together the cream and milk and pour over. Dot with the butter and sprinkle with nutmeg. Cook for until the vegetables are tender when pierced (up to an hour, depending on the vegetables used) and the top is bubbling and golden.
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Old 09-18-2006, 09:12 AM   #12
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Yum!

Swede is rutabega by another name, right?

Moot point. Can't get it here anyways
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Old 09-18-2006, 09:16 AM   #13
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Yes, but you could use small turnips or something like kohl rabi, or even mundane carrots!
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Old 09-18-2006, 09:18 AM   #14
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Sharon, why can't they be boiled together? Does one take longer than other to cook? I've never worked with it before. How long should diced Celriac take to cook?

Isbel, the casserole sounds delicious even though I've never had celeriac.
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Old 09-18-2006, 10:35 AM   #15
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Peel and cut slices about 1/2" inch thick. Simmer in salted water until tender. Drain and cool. Dip the slices in beaten egg and then in bread crumbs (seasoned or not, your choice). You may then place them on a parchment lined pan and bake in a 350º oven until golden brown or you may saute the slices in olive oil until they are browned. Good with a sprinkle of fresh lemon juice or a dab or two of tartar sauce.[/quote]

I make something similar.
Cut the celeriac into "French fries", blanch them briefly, then bread and fry them.
Usually serve these with salsa in place of chips and can never make enough.
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Old 09-18-2006, 10:49 AM   #16
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That gratin looks great Ishbel! I love prepared celeriac from jars in salads and sandwiches too. I have posted it somewhere else but its great mashed with chickeas and put over a spiced and jazzed up minced lamb to make a morrocan inspried shepard's pie (my sister's recipe!)
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Old 09-18-2006, 10:59 AM   #17
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Whelp, celeriac is on my list!

But I'm not going to the store again until I make up some menus. I've just been buying willy nilly and have a freezer and pantry filled with this and that.

I need to go through both freezers and see what's there. I just cleaned out the pantry so I did some tossing and reorganizing. I actually know where everything is located.
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Old 09-18-2006, 01:00 PM   #18
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when cooked, it is somewhat like celery in flavor, but sa stated in previous posts, milder in flavor, and slightly sweet. Think of a mild turnip with a bit of celery. It can be used in slaws as well as the other recipes already given. I like to add it to a brothy potato beef soup with chunks of beef, potatoes, carrot, celery root, onions, and garlic. You can also add dried tomatoes to this soup. Season with S & P.

Celery root is also very good in New England Boiled Dinner and makes a great substitue for rutabegga or a partner for the same veggie.

Try it. You will find a thousand ways to use it.

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Old 09-18-2006, 01:21 PM   #19
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We tried cooking them together - but the celery root seemed to take longer to cook. It is such a fantastic veggie. I don't think I ever had it until a few years ago, right around the time I discovered parsnips Madly in love with all those root veggies. One of our friends always brings "nips" (mashed turnips) to Thanksgiving and Christmas dinner. I'm so glad it's fall!!!!!
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Old 09-18-2006, 05:25 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Harborwitch
We tried cooking them together - but the celery root seemed to take longer to cook. It is such a fantastic veggie. I don't think I ever had it until a few years ago, right around the time I discovered parsnips Madly in love with all those root veggies. One of our friends always brings "nips" (mashed turnips) to Thanksgiving and Christmas dinner. I'm so glad it's fall!!!!!
For me, it's not Thanksgiving without smashed rutabeggas (very similar to turnips) with butter and a bit of mollases and Splenda mixed in. Unfortunately, I love the root veggies more than they love me. They are very high in carbs. But if they are root veggies with a bunch of fiber, then it's all good.

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