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Old 05-18-2014, 01:16 PM   #11
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Yep. That's the way to do it. Urban gleaning is a bit more of a challenge ever since I read that one shouldn't pick plants on park land property.
Also---- urban gleaning of food by a highway may have some problems with toxic materials spewed from the vehicles using the highway. Or lead in the soil.

But if I were starving, I'd take the chance!
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Old 05-18-2014, 01:20 PM   #12
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Up on Route 1A the old Italian women would go onto the median strip and dig up the dandelion greens. They would get into fights as what was their patch when someone crossed the imaginary line. Finally, the authorities had to put a stop to it. Too many were getting hit by cars when going to and fro from the strip.
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Old 05-18-2014, 04:14 PM   #13
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I don't think there is any actually wild asparagus in North America. It isn't native. I think the "wild asparagus" is actually feral.
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Old 05-18-2014, 04:20 PM   #14
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I don't think there is any actually wild asparagus in North America. It isn't native. I think the "wild asparagus" is actually feral.
I think you may be right. The 'wild' asparagus I picked was downwind from an area that had many asparagus fields.
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Old 05-18-2014, 04:30 PM   #15
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Yep. That's the way to do it. Urban gleaning is a bit more of a challenge ever since I read that one shouldn't pick plants on park land property.
I've been known to help the city or county reduce its maintenance expenses by removing some the items that they will eventually need to pay someone to dispose of, I feel it's my civic duty to help out where I can!
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Old 05-19-2014, 04:29 PM   #16
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I don't think there is any actually wild asparagus in North America. It isn't native. I think the "wild asparagus" is actually feral.
Actually, the other way around. Farmed asparagus is simply "feral" asparagus that's been cultivated. The stuff people pick and call wild asparagus in this country is the same variety you buy in the grocery store. And "white asparagus" is simply green asparagus that's covered over with dirt or plastic tunnels to keep the sunlight out, which in turn prevents it from creating chlorophyll.
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Old 05-19-2014, 07:26 PM   #17
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Actually, the other way around. Farmed asparagus is simply "feral" asparagus that's been cultivated. The stuff people pick and call wild asparagus in this country is the same variety you buy in the grocery store. And "white asparagus" is simply green asparagus that's covered over with dirt or plastic tunnels to keep the sunlight out, which in turn prevents it from creating chlorophyll.
I'm confused. I call it feral because it escaped from cultivation. It's not native to North America. It was brought here in the 1700s, presumably to cultivate it. I agree it's the same species as the cultivated asparagus.
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Old 05-19-2014, 07:47 PM   #18
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Actually, the other way around. Farmed asparagus is simply "feral" asparagus that's been cultivated. The stuff people pick and call wild asparagus in this country is the same variety you buy in the grocery store.
Not quite because most of what we buy in the store are hybrids so their seeds won't reproduce true. But it's a small point.
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Old 05-19-2014, 07:48 PM   #19
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I agree. When on vacation in Aruba, we buy huge fat carrots at the supermarket that are sweeter and more flavorful than the bagged mini carrots we see at home.
I buy 28lb bags of "pony carrots" (ie sold for owners to feed to their equines) for Horse from the local greengrocer and Horse kindly allows me to take some home. They are often peculiar shapes - corkscrew, bifurcated and other oddities that the supermarkets won't accept. They are delicious. Much better than the tasteless supermarket carrots. They're a fraction of the price - less than 10 pence a pound, unlike supermarket ones at 55 pence a pound and, unlike the supermarket carrots, they come from the next county - about 30 miles away and don't travel three times round the country before getting to the greengrocer's shop.
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Old 05-19-2014, 09:23 PM   #20
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They don't. Give me a big hunk of a carrot, potato or any veggie. Sure some of the big ones have more seeds, but that problem is easily solved. Scrape them out if they bother you. Grape tomatoes are totally flavorless to me. I want flavor, not cuteness.
I agree completely. Give me a flavorful, non-messed with, ugly veggie, with full flavor every time. Spots on apples, no problem. Spots or cracks in tomatoes, serve 'em up. Carrots, the fatter the better.

Mini carrots, perfectly round tomatoes, skinny asparagus, why can't people be satisfied with real, natural food. It's healthier, and engineered by nature, or Deity to work with out taste buds, etc.

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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