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Old 07-12-2017, 12:12 PM   #21
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Wow, this is some old thread you dug out. I don't think chanterelles are good to be dried. Marinated in vinegar solution, boiled and fried as the side dish along with some potatoes and meat. Dried? No, they are just the wrong kind of mushroom for that purpose. On the other hand the boletes are excellent dried. They are the best to use for a hearty mushroom soup in the winter time.
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Old 07-12-2017, 02:24 PM   #22
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We received more than 4 inches of rain last night, which means, water in the basement until the pumps catch up. There are poisonous mushrooms cropping up now, all over the place. I know a morel and I know a puff ball, but I don't know mushrooms. I'm not a risk taker, so they are all poisonous.
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Old 07-12-2017, 04:33 PM   #23
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"I'm not a risk taker, so they are all poisonous."

I basically agree but the 2 types I mention and collect are totally identifiable and have no 'look-alikes'
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Old 07-12-2017, 04:43 PM   #24
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"Dried? No, they are just the wrong kind of mushroom for that purpose."

The Google pages have 100's of entrries for dried chanterelles. The drying really works - I was just curious to hear if someone knew where the bitterness comes from - it's easily ditched with the soak water and the product emerges just fine. Freezing works well but too many to put in there - the vinegar takes over from the neat natural flavor of the chanterelles IMO.
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Old 07-12-2017, 05:21 PM   #25
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Bob 66,

The only way I eat my Boletus, are sautéed with Spanish Evvo, sautéed with a little minced parsley, a bit of sea salt fine grain, and a clove or 2 of minced garlic ..

Since, I reside close to the Pyrenées separating Spain from France, they are foraged or picked from the forests in autumn & Winter ( October - March ).

Chanterelles, are common here in Spring. I do same ..

I do not like to disguise the taste of Boletus or any other wild forest mushroom as I am a true enthusiast.

I also adore, Black Trumphets and Morilles from same region ..

I like to have them as a starter ..

They pair best with venison or beef, in my opinión or in a Risotto di Funghi .. Risotto with Mushrooms ..

Welcome to Discuss Cooking and have a nice day.
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Old 07-12-2017, 07:26 PM   #26
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I live in an area where we get mushrooms virtually all year round. We also get white truffles and, year, black truffles, but the white ones are particularly sought after. Here's my recipe for truffle and mushroom risotto:

Per portion:

70g wild mushrooms
10g porcini (boletus edilis)
10g black or white truffles
40g finely chopped onions
2 large cloves garlic
home made vegetable or chicken stock (The water from the dried boletus edilis is particularly good)
black summer truffles or white Alba truffles
2 -3 tbsp Mascarpone or Philadelphia Light
1 handful grated fresh Parmesan cheese.
Butter
500g Vialone rice
Dry white wine

Chop the onions and garlic very fine and sweat in butter, then add the rice and cook until the rice is slightly browned in colour. Have the mushrooms rough chopped or sliced and ready to use. If you're using dried porcini, have them ready soaked, roughly chopped, and keep the water for later. Add the mushrooms to the soffritto,then the wine, to taste, then add the stock a little at a time. When the stock has been fully absorbed, stir in the Philaphelia cheese, and then add the Parmesan cheese. Sprinkle over a little more Parmesan before serving.

If I want to do a chicken and mushroom casserole, I add some bacon lardons and fry off chicken pieces after doing the soffritto. That's nice as well. Any suggestions for making it better gratefully received.


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Old 07-12-2017, 08:34 PM   #27
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I did not mean that you cannot dry them. Of course you can. But they are just not good dried.
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Old 07-13-2017, 04:01 AM   #28
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Quote:
But they are just not good dried.
Well, that has not been the experience I've had nor many, many others.

I get, fortunately, plenty of chanterelles each year and use them fresh, unfrozen and dried...The dried are, in many cases, even better as not 'slimy' as when fresh - they also have more flavor as it is then concentrated.

It was just this 'bitterness' that can be eliminated with throwing out the soak-water. And my cusiosity about what's going on there.

One 'trick' too is when using them 'fresh' - to let them dry a bit 12-24 hours. The texture improves amazingly for some dishes and soups.

But the question I posed is already producing results as we all now have what looks like a very good risotto recipe from the Piedmont!
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Old 07-13-2017, 05:22 AM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sagittarius View Post
Bob 66,

The only way I eat my Boletus, are sautéed with Spanish Evvo, sautéed with a little minced parsley, a bit of sea salt fine grain, and a clove or 2 of minced garlic ..

Since, I reside close to the Pyrenées separating Spain from France, they are foraged or picked from the forests in autumn & Winter ( October - March ).

Chanterelles, are common here in Spring. I do same ..

I do not like to disguise the taste of Boletus or any other wild forest mushroom as I am a true enthusiast.

I also adore, Black Trumphets and Morilles from same region ..

I like to have them as a starter ..

They pair best with venison or beef, in my opinión or in a Risotto di Funghi .. Risotto with Mushrooms ..

Welcome to Discuss Cooking and have a nice day.
The OP you just replied to hasn't been here since 8-12-13.
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Old 07-13-2017, 05:31 AM   #30
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Quote:
The OP you just replied to hasn't been here since 8-12-13.
To whom is this addressed? Aren't all replies here 'general' - and attention to any particular poster then mentioned in actual text?
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