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Old 03-02-2014, 08:37 PM   #11
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Green mangoes...how do those taste?
I have found a few recipes that call for green mangoes. If and when I find them again, am asking my BIL, who is a trucker delivering fresh produce, to get me some.

The flavour is supposed to be different. Still mango but.... when I find those mischievously disappearing recipes, I'll let you know!
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Old 03-03-2014, 12:54 PM   #12
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The Scoville scale is the standard for defining the heat in chiles: The Scoville Heat Scale for Chilli Peppers and Hot Sauces from ChilliWorld. Compare relative heats all the way to Blair's 6 A.M. - pure capsaicin.

And I found this page that lists lots of hot sauces and their heat levels compared to a jalapeņo: WorldHottestHotSauce.com

A lot of this depends on individual heat tolerance, though. I would always add a little, taste, add more if needed and make a note on your recipe.
Thanks for the list. I can now print it out and take it with me to the bar.
There was discussion on what was the hottest pepper and most of them thought it was still the habanero.

Of course we now know thats not true. But in Inman SC, it takes a decade or so for any new information to be absorbed.
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Old 03-03-2014, 02:52 PM   #13
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Green mangoes...how do those taste?
Green mangoes are delicious---- but not sweet. More for savory dishes than sweet ones. Here is an easy version of a salad that's very common.

Thai Green Mango Salad (Som Tum Mamuang) Recipe | SAVEUR

Here's another one:

Salad - Thai Green Mango Salad Recipe

The times I've made it I wasn't always 'picky'---- for instance didn't look for the Thai red peppers but used Jalapeno's or ???
I also left out the string beans. But it's one of those salads that can have different ingredients.

Fish sauce is one ingredient that can't be left out. If you haven't cooked with fish sauce before---- do NOT sniff it in the bottle! It might turn you off. But used in cooking it's marvelous and just can't be replaced.
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Old 03-03-2014, 02:56 PM   #14
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I have a very high tolerance for heat in sauces------ but once we went to an Indonesian restaurant in San Francisco and asked the waiter to bring their 'hot sauce' because what was on the table wasn't very hot to our standards.

Well------- I'll never do that again!!!! OOPHH!! WOW! Blew the top of our heads off!
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Old 03-03-2014, 03:20 PM   #15
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Cave, you reminded me of an episode at a Thai resto with my sister. She doesn't like much heat in her food. I'm happy up to, and including, vindaloo hot.

I said I wanted meal medium hot. My sister expressed her reservations. Since it was a meal for two, they brought us a "mildly hot" sauce. I put some on my food - no heat that I could detect. I tried the food without the sauce. It was mildly hot. The danged sauce managed to have negative heat.
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Old 03-03-2014, 03:31 PM   #16
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Cave, you reminded me of an episode at a Thai resto with my sister. She doesn't like much heat in her food. I'm happy up to, and including, vindaloo hot.

I said I wanted meal medium hot. My sister expressed her reservations. Since it was a meal for two, they brought us a "mildly hot" sauce. I put some on my food - no heat that I could detect. I tried the food without the sauce. It was mildly hot. The danged sauce managed to have negative heat.
My 'mild' vent here ----- some people will pant and wave their hands wildly in from of their mouths with just a nano-particle of something that might be considered hot! I swear they see the word 'pepper' (like in black pepper or green pepper) and have a fit.

Now, I can't see how one fleck of black pepper in your food will make it 'hot'!

"Negative heat" Isn't that defying some law of physics?
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Old 03-03-2014, 03:32 PM   #17
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Thanks for the list. I can now print it out and take it with me to the bar.
There was discussion on what was the hottest pepper and most of them thought it was still the habanero.

Of course we now know thats not true. But in Inman SC, it takes a decade or so for any new information to be absorbed.
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Old 03-03-2014, 03:33 PM   #18
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I personally think of habaneros and Scotch bonnets as the hottest peppers - that I find worth using.
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Old 03-03-2014, 04:22 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
Cave, you reminded me of an episode at a Thai resto with my sister. She doesn't like much heat in her food. I'm happy up to, and including, vindaloo hot.

I said I wanted meal medium hot. My sister expressed her reservations. Since it was a meal for two, they brought us a "mildly hot" sauce. I put some on my food - no heat that I could detect. I tried the food without the sauce. It was mildly hot. The danged sauce managed to have negative heat.
At my favorite Thai restaurant, those in the know can ask for the spice tray. It has five sauces - a couple different hot sauces, pepper pieces in vinegar and a couple others I can't remember - so you can spice up your meal as much as you like.
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Old 03-03-2014, 04:44 PM   #20
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At my favorite Thai restaurant, those in the know can ask for the spice tray. It has five sauces - a couple different hot sauces, pepper pieces in vinegar and a couple others I can't remember - so you can spice up your meal as much as you like.

Chili peppers in fish sauce. The ones here also often have a dry pepper powder.
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chili, pepper, recipe, sauce

Chili pepper paste or sauce Back again trying to define chili heat. Wish there was a set standard. European, asian, North American. Code 1 to 10. Made a sauce today that called for chili-garlic sauce. Was going to use Sambal Oelek which is called Chili Paste. Remembered the last (only time, so far!) that I used it. Barely a 1/4 tsp and it was HOT. This recipe called for 1 tsp. oh oh... better think this one thru! In my fridge found some (President's Choice brand) "Memories of Thailand" 'fiery chili pepper sauce'... which was not so "fiery". I subbed for that rather than the sambal but now realize I could easily have added more of this ingredient. so 1st question is.... How are we supposed to gauge just how "hot" a sauce/paste/etc is for individual recipes???? 2nd question is.... what is a good way to taste test different 'hot' spices. eat bread between tasting? or something else? yogurt? cheese? what gets rid of the heat in your mouth to gauge the next sample? Btw, it was delicious, Pla Krapong Paw. Grilled (I baked it) fish (salmon) with Coriander-Chili Sauce. soooooo good, even thou could have added more heat (but just a little, I still like to distinguish various flavours!). That's with roasted Brussels accented with zest and garlic, with the lemon-grass scented rice (from the other day :angel:) cooked in coconut milk. 3 stars 1 reviews
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