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Old 09-17-2004, 11:23 AM   #1
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Liquid Smoke and Molassas

I do not know if this is in the right area or not. If its not, my apologies.

I have seen both of these ingredients used in some recipes online (and even on this board). Most of them have been sauces (hence my reasoning for posting it in here).

My question is simply what are they? What do they bring to a recipe as far as taste, texture? To what extent is its usability?

Ive looked online and did not find any information outside of molasses being some type of syrup. Thats all :S

Thanks for any input in advance!

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Old 09-17-2004, 11:28 AM   #2
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I found tis on molasses from www.cooksthesaurus.com Hope it helps some.

molasses = treacle Pronunciation: muh-LASS-sis Equivalents: One cup = 8 ounces Notes: Sugar is made by extracting juice from sugar cane or sugar beets, boiling them, and then extracting the sugar crystals. Molasses is the thick, syrupy residue that's left behind in the vats. It has a sweet, distinctive flavor, and it's a traditional ingredient in such things as gingerbread, baked beans, rye bread, and shoofly pie. There are several different varieties. Light molasses = sweet molasses = mild molasses = Barbados molasses is taken from the first boiling. It's the sweetest and mildest, and is often used as a pancake syrup or a sweetener for beverages. Dark molasses = full molasses = full-flavored molasses is left behind after the juices are boiled a second time. It's less sweet but more flavorful than light molasses, and it's a good choice if a recipe simply calls for molasses. Blackstrap molasses comes from the third and final boiling. It's too strong and bitter for most recipes, and it's mostly consumed for its alleged nutritional benefits. Most of the molasses sold in supermarkets is unsulfured. Sulfured molasses has sulfur dioxide added as a preservative, and isn't as mild and sweet as unsulfured molasses. Food grade molasses is almost always made from sugar cane. Sugar beet molasses is very bitter and is mostly used as cattle feed or as a medium for growing yeast. When measuring molasses, grease the cup and utensils to keep molasses from sticking. If your molasses crystallizes while being stored, heat it gently to dissolve the crystals. After opening, you can store molasses in your cupboard. Substitutes: dark corn syrup OR maple syrup (works well in gingerbread cookies) OR honey OR barley malt syrup (weaker flavor; use 1/3 less) OR brown sugar (Substitute 1.5 cups brown sugar for every 1 cup molasses)
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Old 09-17-2004, 11:28 AM   #3
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Colgin Natural Liquid Smoke is an all-natural product with no additives or preservatives. It is manufactured using a safe, water-based process, in which unwanted byproducts are removed. Colgin Natural Liquid Smoke contains no measurable caloric content (0 calories!) per 4.5g serving. A little liquid smoke goes a long way in livening up taste, so start off with about one teaspoon per serving in your favorite recipe and then add more from there to taste.

Colgin Natural Liquid Smoke contains: Water, Natural Smoke Flavor, Vinegar, Molasses, Caramel Color and Salt.

Colgin Natural Liquid Smoke contains no measurable fat content (0 mg fat!), 10mg sodium (Hickory & Apple) or 0 mg sodium (Mesquite & Pecan), and is not a significant source of calories from cholesterol, sugar, dietary fiber, vitamin A, vitamin C, calcium, and Iron.

We all know that smoking food products adds flavor and color to them. But liquid smoke, which is generated from hardwood sawdust, also has antioxidative and antimicrobial properties as well. It's possible to add liquid smoke to meat products to improve their safety and shelf life.

Liquid smoke's functionality in meats is mostly the result of acetic, propionic and other organic acids that lower pH and destroy the walls of bacteria cells. The phenolic compounds in the smoke are well-known bacteriocides. In one of the university studies, researchers added liquid smoke to pathogenic bacteria in petri dishes, which inhibited microbial growth. The smoke also works well against Salmonella, Listeria and different spoilage organisms.

Because liquid smoke also functions as an antioxidant, it prevents warmed-over flavor (WOF) in products. WOF, common in cooked meat that is not consumed immediately, is caused by lipid oxidation reactions. Sensory and analytical studies indicated that the smoke eliminated WOF in ground beef patties.

If you miss the smoked taste of certain foods that you used to prepare by open grill smoking, you can feel comfortable using liquid smoke on meats, in marinades, soups, sprinkled on fish, and so on.
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Old 09-17-2004, 11:30 AM   #4
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How is Liquid Smoke Made?




Colgin Liquid Smoke is not a chemical or synthetic flavor - but genuine wood smoke "liquefied." The wood is placed in large retorts (1) where intense heat is applied, causing the wood to smoulder (not burn). (2)

THIS IS THE OLD TIME tedious method of barbecuing, which Colgin Liquid Smoke makes unnecessary.

Have you ever seen meat smoked in the old-fashioned way, in a smoke house? If so, you saw drops of dark brown liquid forming on the meat. That was smoke that had condensed into liquid form, just as moisture in the air condenses on the windshield of your car and “fogs it up.” This condensed or “liquid” smoke is the best food flavoring.

Colgin Natural Liquid Smoke is produced by burning fresh cut hickory, mesquite, apple, and pecan wood chips at extremely high temperatures and moisture levels. There’s nothing “synthetic” about it – it’s not made from chemicals. It is made by placing high grade smoking woods in sealed retorts (1), where intense heat makes the wood smolder (not burn) (2), releasing the gases seen in ordinary smoke.

These gases are quickly chilled in condensers (3), which liquefies the smoke; it is then forced through seven refining vats (5 - 11) and a large filter (12), to remove impurities. Finally, the liquid is received into large oak barrels (14) which will age the liquid smoke for mellowness.

While the equipment is modern, computer-controlled and state-of-the-art, the process is the same as when S.E. Colgin first patented it in the early part of the 20th Century.

Colgin Natural Liquid Smoke is an all natural product with no additives or preservatives. It will enhance the flavor of meat, poultry, fish, vegetables, sauces, gravies . . . anything that would taste better with a real smoke flavor and aroma.

Use Colgin Natural Liquid Smoke in your favorite gourmet recipes. Try some of our recipes HERE.

Colgin Natural Liquid Smoke saves time and money! It is a quick, low-cost, healthy alternative to using a smoker and NOW you may have "Smoke Flavor" the convenient way - comes in a bottle with shaker top. Good - wherever smoke flavor is desired. Just dash or brush on Meats, Fish, Fowl or Chops before cooking.
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Old 09-17-2004, 11:30 AM   #5
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This is also from cooksthesaurus.com

liquid smoke Notes: This is a very potent seasoning that imparts a smoky flavor to meat, fish, and vegetarian mock meat products. A little goes a long way. Substitutes: smoked ham hocks (in a stew or sauce) OR omit from recipe OR chipotle pepper (hotter) OR bacon
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Old 09-17-2004, 11:30 AM   #6
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Will, I have never used liquid smoke, but every time I see it in a recipe the directions are to use it SPARINGLY. Basically, use liquid smoke to impart a smoky flavor to something that has not actually been smoked.
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Old 09-17-2004, 01:03 PM   #7
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Wow... that was a very fast reply :)

Thanks for the info!

I just got back from the library and they didnt have too much in the way of food science. A few books, but there are a few in my county. I will check some of the others.
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Old 09-18-2004, 08:19 AM   #8
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I am of the belief that the flavor you get from liquid smoke and the flavor you get from physically smoking something are miles apart.
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Old 09-18-2004, 10:33 PM   #9
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That would be correct Scott.

Used in a lot of bbq sauces, and you can normally taste the ones that have it.
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