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Old 05-12-2016, 03:36 PM   #11
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Here are some other options for grilled chicken (skip the first one - American-style barbecued chicken): The Food Lab's Grilled Chicken World Tour: 5 Recipes to Rock Your Backyard Bird | Serious Eats

I made the Thai one last year - it was very tasty. I'm planning on making the others, except jerk, this year.
What's wrong with jerk? I love it. I buy jerk seasoning mix from Savory in 8 ounce bags just keep up with my usage.
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Old 05-12-2016, 05:01 PM   #12
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What's wrong with jerk? I love it. I buy jerk seasoning mix from Savory in 8 ounce bags just keep up with my usage.
I know lots of people like it, but I'm not fond of the flavor.
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Old 05-12-2016, 11:37 PM   #13
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I know lots of people like it, but I'm not fond of the flavor.
I don't know what you have tried, but I've had many different varieties, and there is a lot of difference from one to another. Jerk chicken in Jamaica can burn the taste buds off your tongue, but the jerk wild boar that I had in the Bahamas was lightly seasoned and very good, more of a sauce than a paste or crust. What I do is different from either of them. I first had jerk 40 years ago in a restaurant in Denver that no longer exists, and that hooked me for life.

Sorry about the off topic promo...
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Old 05-13-2016, 08:15 AM   #14
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I don't know what you have tried, but I've had many different varieties, and there is a lot of difference from one to another. Jerk chicken in Jamaica can burn the taste buds off your tongue, but the jerk wild boar that I had in the Bahamas was lightly seasoned and very good, more of a sauce than a paste or crust. What I do is different from either of them. I first had jerk 40 years ago in a restaurant in Denver that no longer exists, and that hooked me for life.

Sorry about the off topic promo...
It's been quite a while and my tastes have changed since then. I should give it another try.
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Old 05-13-2016, 12:36 PM   #15
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I don't know what you have tried, but I've had many different varieties, and there is a lot of difference from one to another. Jerk chicken in Jamaica can burn the taste buds off your tongue, but the jerk wild boar that I had in the Bahamas was lightly seasoned and very good, more of a sauce than a paste or crust. What I do is different from either of them. I first had jerk 40 years ago in a restaurant in Denver that no longer exists, and that hooked me for life.

Sorry about the off topic promo...
Rick I enjoyed Jerk Chicken very much several times in Jamaica however I've never done it myself as Scotch Bonnet peppers scare me.

I for one would love to hear your way of doing it. Would you mind posting it for us?
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Old 05-13-2016, 01:47 PM   #16
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Rick I enjoyed Jerk Chicken very much several times in Jamaica however I've never done it myself as Scotch Bonnet peppers scare me.

I for one would love to hear your way of doing it. Would you mind posting it for us?
First you don't need scotch bonnet peppers for jerk. Jerk is actually more about the spices than the heat. Here are the ingredients in my favorite jerk mix from Savory. This one has the scotch bonnet, but is still pretty mild. They also offer a hotter version, but I just add my own heat if I want more for specific recipe.

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Toasted onion, salt, allspice, garlic, sugar, Mediterranean thyme, chives, black pepper, nutmeg, Saigon cinnamon, sage and scotch bonnet chiles.
I've also made mixes myself from various recipes. I've used habeņero peppers, but I've also used cayenne and red pepper flakes at different heat levels depending on who I'm cooking for. The real key to jerk is the mix of the allspice, cinnamon and other aromatic spices that give it that distinctive flavor.

I have mixed the dry herbs into a paste with olive oil to rub on the meat or fish for grilling, but I've also used it dry for baking my jerk wings or thighs in the oven (I usually toss in olive oil, then coat them well for a good crust). I also use it for a marinade with oil and vinegar, then grill or roast. I use jerk on chicken, pork, fish and shrimp. Some I use a heavy hand, and others, like shrimp, just to flavor without disguising the meat. For a pork tenderloin I'll coat it heavier because it's a thick cut.
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Old 05-13-2016, 05:01 PM   #17
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Thanks for your input Rick.
I really enjoyed the detailed ideas about the subject and recipe at the Food Lab. Who would guess we could get nearly the needed smoke profile of pimento wood with an abundance of bay leaves?
The Food Lab: How to Make Jerk Chicken at Home | Serious Eats
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Old 05-13-2016, 05:41 PM   #18
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Thanks for your input Rick.
I really enjoyed the detailed ideas about the subject and recipe at the Food Lab. Who would guess we could get nearly the needed smoke profile of pimento wood with an abundance of bay leaves?
The Food Lab: How to Make Jerk Chicken at Home | Serious Eats
Wow, that's interesting. Something to do with all those bay leaves on my tree!
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Old 05-13-2016, 05:49 PM   #19
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Wow, that's interesting. Something to do with all those bay leaves on my tree!
WHOO HOOO GG...you're all set with that bay tree! He said you can order them on line for $9.00 lb.
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Old 05-13-2016, 06:33 PM   #20
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WHOO HOOO GG...you're all set with that bay tree! He said you can order them on line for $9.00 lb.
I clicked that link... the price has gone up since that article was written - now $22.46 per pound, and allspice berries for 10.91 per pound. I am going to order some though. I have to try this and see if I can make it work on my gas grill.
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