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Old 09-16-2004, 03:02 PM   #1
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One very basic question

What is the difference in meat (any type) when you:

1.Marinate (wet)
2.Brine
3.Marinate (dry)

Then grill/roast/cook?

Thanks!

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Old 09-16-2004, 04:33 PM   #2
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Jim Tarantino--

From his book, "Marinades":

First of all, marinades do not tenderize food. They soften and denature it. Tenderizing occurs in food when muscle tissue is separated, torn, or bruised. Tenderizing, for example, occurs when a cook pounds a chicken breast or a veal scallop with a kitchen mallet. Marinades soften or denature tissue with their acid ingredients."

"Marinades do not penetrate deeply into muscle tissue. When a marinade hits the surface of meat or poultry, the muscle tissue softens and expands; in some cases this stops penetration."

Paraphrasing here: Marinades are made up of three parts with three specific flavor roles. The first is acid, such as wine, vinegar, citrus juice, or yogurt, acting as a softening agent. The second is oil, which adds flavor and moisture. The third is the aromatics that give the marinade its aroma and flavor.
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Old 09-16-2004, 04:37 PM   #3
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Brine A method for increasing the water content in the meat and thereby making the meat more moist and tender. Brining can also impart salt and flavor into the meat.

Baste A liquid that you apply to the meat in the last 5 minutes or so of grilling. A baste usually contains sugar or may be tomato ketchup based. A sugars in a baste will usually burn if left on the grill for more than a few minutes. any barbecue sauce can be used as a baste.

Dipping Sauce A table sauce that is used on the finished meat as you eat it.

Direct heat Exposing the meat to the direct heat and flames of the fire. Placing the meat directly over the coals of the fire.

Dry rub A mixture of dry spices and herbs that you rub into the meat, salt and pepper being the simplest.

Finishing Sauce A sauce that is usually applied in the last few minutes of cooking or applied immediately after the meat has been removed from the grill.

Glaze A liquid containing some form of sugar that is applied to the meat just before or just after it has finished cooking.

Indirect heat Not exposing the meat to the direct heat and flames of the fire. Placing the meat so that it is not directly over the coals of the fire.

Mop Similar to a baste, but usually thinner and usually not containing sugar. Applied to the meat as it cooks to keep the outside of the meat from drying out.

Marinade A liquid that contains an acid component, a flavor component and an oil component that is used to flavor the meat before it is cooked. Marinades that do not contain an enzyme do not tenderize meat.

Paste rub A thick paste of spices and herbs that you rub onto the outside surface of the meat
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Old 09-16-2004, 04:40 PM   #4
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if you brine a brisket, it will taste more like ham than beef. This is how turkey ham is made.
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Old 09-16-2004, 05:55 PM   #5
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The process of making corned beef is basically brining the brisket.
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Old 09-17-2004, 11:00 AM   #6
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Thank you Rainee so so so much!!!!!!!!!!!!! You gave me all the info I never even thought of ! So much I didn't know! Thanks marmalady, I feel so ignorant I'm printing everything and I'll be improving my BBQ hopefully with your guy's help! Thanks once again :)
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Old 09-17-2004, 11:05 AM   #7
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I have a final question please :)

Does this mean a dry-rub will only contribute to flavor? nothing to do with moisture and tenderness of the meat? Oh and one last question, Could you marinade something twice? Like Brine at firt then pat dry & apply a dry rub?
Thanks!
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Old 09-19-2004, 04:27 PM   #8
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I think the answer to both these is yes. A dry rub just flavours your meat, it doesn't affect the texture. I had a friend who used to use a tenderising poweder (it looked nasty but I think it's made from the papaya enzyme) so I think there are ways of dry tenderising, but normally, it is just flavouring the meat.

I can't see why you wouldn't be able to apply a rub after brining. I have never tried brining, I keep meaning to, there have been some great discussions and recipes here in the past.
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Old 09-21-2004, 10:37 AM   #9
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Thanks Kyles :)
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Old 09-23-2004, 08:18 AM   #10
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to Rainee and other experts - I'm totally confused about how brines work

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rainee
Brine A method for increasing the water content in the meat and thereby making the meat more moist and tender. Brining can also impart salt and flavor into the meat.
I thought salt basically acted to draw out the natural juices so why does brine increase the water content of meat? is the brine replacing the meat's natural juices?
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