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Old 10-30-2006, 07:45 PM   #1
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Smile Recomendations on some great Balsamics?

Hi all u knowledgeable people!
Im a newbie (home-cooking only!) who loves good food and wine! For the longest time I have wanted to find me some really nice balsamic vinegars, but really dont know where to start, what to chose, where to get it. Anyone who could recomend some?
Would be great to find one thats ok priced, tastes great and have a great "everyday-use" flavour. That would be my basic one I guess. Then, if you have a kick-*** balsamic that just blows you away, let me know about that one too, and I can use it for an even greater dining experience now and then. All hints, info and ideas on balsamics are so welcome - I wanna learn more and hear of your favourite ones!
Thaaaaaaaaaanks!
Ladyzoul.

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Old 10-30-2006, 11:52 PM   #2
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What's your price range?
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Old 10-31-2006, 12:25 AM   #3
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like hot sauces(or wines) there is a market for "boutique" balsamics that cover the range from daily use, to every now and again. If you are looking for some rock your socks off, be prepared to pay accordingly.


Google it and I am sure there are a million and six to choose from.
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Old 10-31-2006, 03:05 AM   #4
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Assuming you don't have unlimited disposable income to spend on "aged" balsamic vinegar ... for the affordable everyday use catagory, Monari Federzoni's Balsamic Vinegar of Modena (green label) has been judged among the best for several years, by several sources. You should be able to find it in a large national chain grocery store there in Maryland, or maybe a gourmet shop. Under $20 for 500ml.

Primo stuff can cost $75+ per ounce. But, if you want the really thick (thick as honey stored in the refrigerator for a month), aged for 100+ years and you only need two-drops stuff ... you're probably looking at as much as $250 or more per ounce.

You can take the simple green label Monari mentioned above - reduce it until thick - and use it on melon, ice cream, etc. - any place where you would use a "thick" balsamic.
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Old 10-31-2006, 09:12 AM   #5
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Michael's advice is pretty much spot on. Really, sky is the limit when you start looking for a real vintage balsamic. And if you ever have a chance to taste it, it is completely a different thing as the generic ones.
It is, to a degree closer to honey than a commonly known "vinegar", very thick and sweet. Also the flavour is so intense, it is true that a tiny drop goes a long way. It will be worth it to sample a little bottle, make sure it is a product of Modena, Italy. The most typical, loved way of enjoying this type of balsamic is to dress the ripe strawberries in season.
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Old 10-31-2006, 09:26 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ironchef
What's your price range?

For a basic one, still good quality (whats the point using a cheap but nasty one, that is some expensive balsamic right there... ) I guess around 10-15 $, A "fine" aged one, 20-40 $ probably, since they also seem to last forever, well is that also after the bottle has been opened? Since its so acidi I guess it survives for a while. You dont wanna lose that fine taste, once shopped for a fancy one... I live in Washington DC, so any stores around here for that stuff? Just moved here from Sweden so alittle dislocated still on food market around here...
Thanks alot for all your help guys!
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Old 10-31-2006, 09:29 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael in FtW
Assuming you don't have unlimited disposable income to spend on "aged" balsamic vinegar ... for the affordable everyday use catagory, Monari Federzoni's Balsamic Vinegar of Modena (green label) has been judged among the best for several years, by several sources. You should be able to find it in a large national chain grocery store there in Maryland, or maybe a gourmet shop. Under $20 for 500ml.

Primo stuff can cost $75+ per ounce. But, if you want the really thick (thick as honey stored in the refrigerator for a month), aged for 100+ years and you only need two-drops stuff ... you're probably looking at as much as $250 or more per ounce.

You can take the simple green label Monari mentioned above - reduce it until thick - and use it on melon, ice cream, etc. - any place where you would use a "thick" balsamic.
Thanks!!! I will try this one to start with and your tips for how to use it, I have only tasted moderate balsamics so far and still love it, so imagine once I start getting a hand on picking, choosing and buying the more delicate ones, ahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh. You people are great, thanks for helping me!
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Old 10-31-2006, 09:33 AM   #8
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Hmm, is 10-15 $ giving you anything than pretty lame balsamics? I put that as the range for basic one, and maybe around 20-40$ for a nicer one, I mean like with wines you got to start somwhere right? And I dont know if this applies to balsamics, but if you're just starting out with wines you need some basic tasting and appretiation before you can appretiate the finer stuff, if U know what I mean...
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Old 10-31-2006, 11:12 AM   #9
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I'd search out a store that allows you to taste before you buy. Wms Sonoma does and so do some ther grocery and gourmet stores.

Although price is a pretty reliable indicator, always look at the label to make sure that what you are buying is real and not red wine vinegar with must, carmel color and sugar added.
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