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Old 03-12-2008, 04:12 PM   #11
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I was told to once roux made on pan to remove from heat and add milk slowly until the right texture is achieved and then return to head and slowly simmer. Works a treat for me 98% of the time.
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Old 03-12-2008, 04:24 PM   #12
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The roux you would use for a cheese sauce as for mac and cheese should not be a brown roux.

Heat butter and whisk in the flour. The heat should be much lower than you had set.
Typically, you would use butter and temperatures that would not cause the butter to burn. Then when you whisk in the flour, it won't immediately or quickly brown. You can let it cool a bit so the milk doesn't become an issue. You don't want it to instantly boil or go to steam.

Once you whisk in the milk and bring up the heat to thicken the bechamel, you can take it off the heat and whisk in the shredded cheese. If the bechamel is too hot when you add the cheese, it can cause the cheese to clump and you will not have a smooth sauce. This is not a reversible error.
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Old 03-12-2008, 05:15 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by darlenemt08 View Post
I've never made roux for my mac & cheese. My cheese sauce is Velveeta cheese,...
You're cheating when you use Velveeta
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Old 03-12-2008, 08:50 PM   #14
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Hi All,
Apologies for not posting the recipe - hit the wrong button at the wrong time.

Here goes - again. A recipe for 4 portions of macaroni and cheese.

You will need 2 pots > 1 medium and 1 large.
A wire whisk, a wooden spoon and cheese grater and a nutmeg grater.
A colander/sieve
A greased 750ml/1 1/2 pint pie dish

* Place 1 oz butter, 1 oz flour and 20 fl oz (UK measurements) of milk in the smaller pan. Place on a medium heat and bring up to the boil whisking all the time. When it comes to the boil add 1 teaspoonful of smooth french mustard (Dijon) and whisk in and then and a couple of bayleaves and a grating of fresh nutmeg. Remove the whisk, lower the heat and allow to simmer VERY gently for 10 - 15 minutes.

* Meanwhile, boil 6 oz/150 gms macaroni in salted boiling water - use the kettle for this.
Cook till al dente, and drain in a colander over a pan and reserve any cooking liquid.

* Return now to the sauce. Take the sauce off the heat, add 4 -6 oz/100 -150 gms of well flavoured cheese like a mature cheddar or, preferably half cheddar and half freshly grated parmesan, in stages and stir (with a wooden spoon) to melt the cheese between each adition. As you do this you should remove any bayleaves. Remember, the cheese is already a cooked product so only needs to be melted. Season the sauce to taste with salt, pepper and freshly grated nutmeg.

* Add the cooked, hot macaroni to the cheese sauce and if you need to thin the sauce use cream or the drained liquid.

* Taste again and adjust as necessary. Pour the Macaroni and cheese into the prepared (greased) baking dish. Sprinkle over 1-2oz/25-50 gms grated cheese and grill/broil or bake in a hot oven (225C/425F/Gas mark 7) until browned and bubbling.

Macaroni and cheese needs to be cooked fresh, unlike Lasagne which can be done in advance, but even so not too much in advance! If allowed to stand, the pasta in a macaroni and cheese absorbs liquid from the sauce and becomes stodgy and unpleasant. Consequently, you need to juggle the cooking of the pasta with the sauce - hence the recommendation to use a kettle to boil water and it may take 2/3 kettlefuls to get lots of boiling water, and hence the requirement to use a large pan. Best tip? - have the water for the pasta simmering before you start making the cheese sauce! How much water for the pasta - LOTS - 2 full electric kettle fulls for the amount of pasta I`ve specified, on a fast rolling boil and a dessertspoonful to a tablespoonful of salt.

Hope this helps,
Archiduc
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Old 03-13-2008, 07:06 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by archiduc View Post
Macaroni and cheese needs to be cooked fresh, unlike Lasagne which can be done in advance, but even so not too much in advance! If allowed to stand, the pasta in a macaroni and cheese absorbs liquid from the sauce and becomes stodgy and unpleasant. Consequently, you need to juggle the cooking of the pasta with the sauce - hence the recommendation to use a kettle to boil water and it may take 2/3 kettlefuls to get lots of boiling water, and hence the requirement to use a large pan. Best tip? - have the water for the pasta simmering before you start making the cheese sauce! How much water for the pasta - LOTS - 2 full electric kettle fulls for the amount of pasta I`ve specified, on a fast rolling boil and a dessertspoonful to a tablespoonful of salt.

Hope this helps,
Archiduc

What's all that water needed for? I use a small pan with enough water to cover the expanded macaroni and little salt. I don't want to waste water/salt/gas.
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