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Old 02-21-2015, 01:35 PM   #11
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May you never be low on beer for drinking RB.

I'm with the Chief on tomato sauces not being cooked for extended periods.

Yet to get the sauce to the desired consistency cooking the maters takes time since maters contain a lot of water so time is your friend here.

Adding your herbs and spices later in the cooking process is the way to keep them "up front" in the final outcome.

I haven't given up on the crock pot yet.

I did the hack of using a dimmer switch to control temperature and it worked. Now I need to figure out how to use it.
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Old 02-21-2015, 01:46 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post
We gave our high tech, large, LED readout type crock pot to our daughter who is a massage therapist. She uses it to keep towels warm.

I am not dead set against slow cookers, but I have learned one very important step that takes the ease out of using a crock pot, thus rendering the crock pot useless as far as convenience.
That step is browning any meat or vegetables before adding them to the slow cooker.
If I were to make a pot roast in one (i may never again but who knows) I would brown the roast on the stove top until chocolate brown, then remove and deglaze adding the remaining liquid to the crock pot.
This alone can be the difference between a very tender roast with little taste or a very tender roast with a great taste.

In any case I prefer to brown, then simmer pot roast in a 300F oven for 2.5 to 3 hours. I always use beer for the liquid. Unless I'm low on beer for drinking.
I did the same thing with my pot roast. The end result was no flavor. Very bland tasting. The veggies give off a lot of their own juices and when everything is done, you have more liquid than solid foods. Which makes for a diluted meal.
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Old 02-22-2015, 07:48 AM   #13
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Because we have a wood burning stove that is on in the winter most of the time I sometimes put a big pot of bones, either beef or chicken carcass with herbs of choice, P&S and lots of water. Put on the stove and leave it for hours. Then, what I have of course at the end is a rich and reduced intensive stock. This is what I use as a base for sauces that I cook like you chief. Short time cooking, that are fresh and bursting with flavor. I used to do this same method with my slow cooker and for that, it was good.
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Old 02-23-2015, 11:42 AM   #14
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I did the same thing with my pot roast. The end result was no flavor. Very bland tasting. The veggies give off a lot of their own juices and when everything is done, you have more liquid than solid foods. Which makes for a diluted meal.
Are you adding any other liquid other than the couple tablespoons of reduced deglazing reduction that remains after browning?

I learned early on that most slow cooker dishes do not require the addition of any liquid and like you said, the food gives off plenty themselves.
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Old 02-24-2015, 02:39 AM   #15
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Are you adding any other liquid other than the couple tablespoons of reduced deglazing reduction that remains after browning?

I learned early on that most slow cooker dishes do not require the addition of any liquid and like you said, the food gives off plenty themselves.
No, I don't add any extra liquid until the end, if needed.
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