"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Sauces, Marinades, Rubs
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 05-10-2005, 06:23 PM   #11
Head Chef
 
abjcooking's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: New York
Posts: 1,460
Just to be clear. If I were to make Tahini (the end product dressing), what would I do?? Would I use the initial recipe from above (which I believe to be the paste that is used as a base), then from that added required amounts of lemon, garlic, etc.... to make the "dressing" that I would serve with food or on top of food?
__________________

__________________
Go Sooners
abjcooking is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-11-2005, 07:27 AM   #12
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: USA,NewJersey
Posts: 403
Abjcooking, seeds take up twice the volume as paste, so if you have a tahini dressing recipe that includes tahini paste and you want to sub seeds, use twice the amount and toss the whole thing (seeds, lemon juice, garlic, water) in the blender.

The recipe at the beginning of the forum, as I said before, is pretty much useless due to the water content. I still contend that it's the result of someone going to a restaurant, seeing the dressing and assuming that it was just watered down, blended paste. It isn't.
__________________

__________________
scott123 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-27-2005, 08:52 PM   #13
Senior Cook
 
bluespanishsky's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: seattle
Posts: 133
Send a message via AIM to bluespanishsky
Quote:
Originally Posted by scott123
Tahini (the paste) should last for months. We're talking desert food here. If you're finding that the tahini you buy is going rancid quickly, there's only one answer - it wasn't all that fresh to begin with. I won't buy supermarket tahini for that very reason. There's usually not enough turnover to maintain a fresh supply of the product. I'm fortunate enough to have a Syrian community about 30 minutes away. That's where I get my tahini. If you don't live near any middle eastern supermarkets... well... my best advice would be to look for the cans with the least amount of dust on them. Seriously.

.
I think you are right on the freshness. My mom brings back tahini from the middle east every year, and I keep it in my cupboard for months. If I'm out I'll end up buying some in a jar from the middle eastern supermarket, and it also seems to keep well in the cupboard.
__________________
bluespanishsky is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-27-2005, 09:31 PM   #14
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 42,459
Tahini = ground sesame seeds = sesame 'butter'.

You could also buy sesame paste in any Asian market. It's the same thing.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2017, 01:50 AM   #15
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Tel Aviv
Posts: 4
I am living for the moment in a rented furnished flat/apartment that has a food processor and one of those wand-like hand-held "immersion blenders", but nothing like a Waring Blender.... and it seems impossible to grind the sesame into a paste.

One thing that helped a great deal was to pan-toast the sesame seeds (without added oil). The toasted seeds seem to grind much better than the raw ones.

Am I still making tehina? It's quite delicious, this "toasted tehina", but it's not the same. Is there a secret to getting the sesame to grind? What kind of grinder/blender works best. Is there some kind of hand grinder that will work for this?

thank you
__________________
petrack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2017, 08:30 AM   #16
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 42,459
I think the toasted seeds grind better because they are drier. I guess you could go back in time and use a mortar and pestle.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2017, 10:43 AM   #17
Wine Guy
 
Steve Kroll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota
Posts: 5,899
Several years ago, I started using peanut butter as a substitute for tahini in recipes for hummus. The two products taste almost exactly the same. Prior to that, there were times I found myself throwing out a jar of expensive tahini because it had gone stale before I had a chance to use it up.

This might sound like a weird thing to do, but I recently read that peanut butter is actually an accepted alternative, even among foodies...
Peanut Buttery Hummus (No Tahini) Recipe | Serious Eats

I do understand that peanut butter isn't always easy to come by outside the US, though.
__________________
Steve Kroll is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2017, 11:08 AM   #18
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 19,157
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Kroll View Post
Several years ago, I started using peanut butter as a substitute for tahini in recipes for hummus. The two products taste almost exactly the same. Prior to that, there were times I found myself throwing out a jar of expensive tahini because it had gone stale before I had a chance to use it up.

This might sound like a weird thing to do, but I recently read that peanut butter is actually an accepted alternative, even among foodies...
Peanut Buttery Hummus (No Tahini) Recipe | Serious Eats

I do understand that peanut butter isn't always easy to come by outside the US, though.
It makes sense to me. Sesame noodle recipes often call for peanut butter, too.
__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2017, 03:13 PM   #19
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 18,506
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
I'll have to try making hummus with peanut butter instead of tahini. Thanks for the tip Steve.
__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2017, 02:47 AM   #20
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Tel Aviv
Posts: 4
Well, I'll be. Yes, in fact I have been making hummus for a few weeks now with peanut butter when I couldn't get the sesame seeds to grind. OK, so while I'm confessing the weird hummuses (hummi? lol) I've been experimenting with, here are three others:

1. A random unknown person told me that the secret to making awesome hummus is NOT to use tehina at all, but instead to grind the sesame and the chickpeas together. The person basically suggested that you grind all the ingredients together at once.
It was doing this in a food processor that left the sesame seeds very poorly ground. So then I tried grinding the sesame seeds alone, and found indeed that they don't grind very well in my food processor. Which is what led me to try pan-toasting them.
On this subject, still, I ask: do people here find that they can grind sesame seeds in a food processor and make smooth hummus? I'm trying to understand if my problem is that I shouldn't be using a food processor, or if I should just be using a much better one. What **do** people grind their sesame seeds with to produce a smooth paste?

2. Actually, I ALSO tried the mortar and pestle route. But unfortunately, the Tel Aviv ghetto I live in seems to sell two kinds of mortar-and-pestles (or is that mortars and pestles). One of them has both mortar and pestle made of wood; the other is a much larger affair ( I believe it's African perhaps?) and it's made of fired glazed clay!! Back in the old country (which for me is Chappaqua, N.Y. USA), these things were made of stone. But techina is not a food that the natives of Chappaqua (neither the original indigenous population, nor the Quakers that replaced them in the 18th century, nor the Jews and former Presidents who replaced the Quakers) make. So: what kind of mortar and pestle do I need to make smooth tehina?

3. In my quest to try "something", I made my last batch of hummus with pan-roasted BLACK sesame seeds. Suprisingly enough, the result was ..... black hummus. Well, dark charcoal grey hummus. It was VERY good, although it was somewhat creepy. If you can use some black in your (non-burnt) food, give it a try.

(About peanut butter being American: I made some black hummus using half black sesame seeds and half peanuts, and the people I served it too all thought that it "tasted Asian.")

I have attached to this post a picture of the hummus made with half black sesame seeds and half peanuts (that is, I ground the cooked chickpeas together with the amount of (peanuts + black sesame ) I would have used to make the tehina paste I would have used to make humus (if I were a normal person). The stuff made without peanuts is even blacker.

Click image for larger version

Name:	WIN_20170804_10_50_36_Pro.jpg
Views:	8
Size:	48.9 KB
ID:	27470
__________________

__________________
petrack is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:16 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.