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Old 05-09-2005, 09:40 PM   #1
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Tahini

Has anyone ever made their own tahini paste? I found a recipe for it, but don't know if it will be worth the effort. If anyone has any suggestions or advise please let me know. Here is the recipe I found.

Tahini (Sesame Seed Paste) Recipe


Ingredients
2 tablespoons sesame seeds
1/2 teaspoon sesame oil
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 cup tepid water


Instructions
Blend sesame seeds in a blender and grind until smooth. Add sesame oil, salt, and then slowly add 1/4 cup of water while blending. Blend until completely smooth. Yield: 1/2 cup

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Old 05-09-2005, 11:18 PM   #2
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I'll be trying this! I don't use Tahini often enough and find myself tossing out way more of a jar or can than I use. This is a perfect solution to that. Thanks!


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Old 05-10-2005, 08:55 AM   #3
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I think the author of that recipe might be a little confused between tahini (sesame paste) aka sesame butter and tahini dressing.

Tahini is pure nut butter, ie ground sesame seeds. That's it. Think peanut butter, but instead of using peanuts, sesame seeds are used instead. It's longevity is based on the fact that it contains no water. Although tahini will last for months without refrigeration, the fresher it is, the better it tastes. Refrigeration can help in this regard.

Tahini dressing is a dressing made from tahini that contains lemon juice, garlic, salt, and water. If you've ever been to a middle eastern restaurant, that's the 'gravy' type stuff that they pour over platters and add to pita based sandwiches. Because it contains water and has perishable ingredients, it must be refrigerated and keeps no longer than a few days.

Tahini, besides being used for tahini dressing, is used in hummuous, babaganouj and halvah.

It does get a little confusing because some restaurants will refer to tahini dressing as simply 'tahini.' Still, though, the dressing and the nut butter are two different animals, and have vastly differing shelf lives.
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Old 05-10-2005, 09:06 AM   #4
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Scott123 this is interesting. I find that the cans of tahini (not dressing, but pure tahini) do not last very long at all, even in the fridge. I find it only lasts a few weeks at most. I do not use very much of a can usually so I wished it lasted longer. Any ideas why mine seems to go rancid quicker than what you would expect and any suggestions as to how I could prolong its life?
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Old 05-10-2005, 11:51 AM   #5
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I am a little confused. So the recipe is for tahini dressing and not tahini paste?

I looked up the definition on tahini. (below) then listed under that was an external link to a recipe. That's how I got the recipe.

Tahini

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.


Tahini (or "tehina" in Hebrew) is a paste made from ground sesame seeds. It is a major ingredient in hummus and other dishes from the Middle East. It can be purchased fresh, in cans, in jars, or dehydrated. Tahini comes in two varieties - 'hulled' and 'unhulled'. Both types are relatively high in vitamins and contain a small amount of protein. Unhulled tahini is quite bitter but has a much higher proportion of vitamins, calcium, and protein because the sesame seeds are ground whole.

As a spread, tahini can replace peanut butter on bread. Tahini paste is often used in a wide variety of dishes. You can find it in most Arabic restaurants as a side dish or as a garnish. Tahini is considered an exotic dish due to the lack of production of sesame in Western countries.
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Old 05-10-2005, 12:00 PM   #6
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I actually would not even call it a recipe for tahini dressing (I have always just called both the dressing and paste tahini) since there is no lemon juice or garlic.

To me it looks like an approximation of tahini. It is not exactly how you would make it, but it would get you close and could prob be substituted for real tahini in many cases if real tahini was not available.
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Old 05-10-2005, 12:03 PM   #7
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Tahini paste is just what you described, sesame seeds ground into a peanut buttery consistancy.

From there it is used as the base in tahini sauces, which is what Scott is describing with the added spices.


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Old 05-10-2005, 12:12 PM   #8
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Thanks for the help. I will give both of them a try.
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Old 05-10-2005, 01:50 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GB
Scott123 this is interesting. I find that the cans of tahini (not dressing, but pure tahini) do not last very long at all, even in the fridge. I find it only lasts a few weeks at most. I do not use very much of a can usually so I wished it lasted longer. Any ideas why mine seems to go rancid quicker than what you would expect and any suggestions as to how I could prolong its life?
Tahini (the paste) should last for months. We're talking desert food here. If you're finding that the tahini you buy is going rancid quickly, there's only one answer - it wasn't all that fresh to begin with. I won't buy supermarket tahini for that very reason. There's usually not enough turnover to maintain a fresh supply of the product. I'm fortunate enough to have a Syrian community about 30 minutes away. That's where I get my tahini. If you don't live near any middle eastern supermarkets... well... my best advice would be to look for the cans with the least amount of dust on them. Seriously.

You can grind the seeds yourself (without water, obviously), but it'll be difficult to match the creaminess of the canned stuff. Hummus, babaganouj and tahini dressing really don't work unless the tahini is smooth.

If you've got a good blender, then maybe you can blend the seeds with oil. If the seeds and the oil are warm, they'll be a little more liquid/blend easier.

Also, you can make hummus and tahini dressing in the blender. If you that, you can start with seeds. If you do use seeds, make sure those are fresh, as it's easy to buy rancid seeds as well.
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Old 05-10-2005, 02:07 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by abjcooking
Tahini

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.


As a spread, tahini can replace peanut butter on bread. Tahini paste is often used in a wide variety of dishes. You can find it in most Arabic restaurants as a side dish or as a garnish.
Wikipedia doesn't really get it. They're equating tahini and tahini dressing. You'll never find the pure paste served "as a side dish" in restaurants. You will find tahini dressing, though.

My problem with the recipe is that by the time you add all that water to make it blend, it's pretty much worthless. You wouldn't want that much water in babaganouj or hummous. Although tahini dressing has a certain amount of water, I think the amount in this recipe, combined with whatever lemon juice you'd be adding would result in a pretty runny end product.

If you wanted to set out to make tahini dressing and all you had was sesame seeds, then you could combine the water, seeds, lemon juice and garlic and come up with something pretty good. But blending sesame seeds with water and calling it tahini paste? No.
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