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Old 12-13-2012, 01:27 AM   #21
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Does anyone use the old toss a noodle on the ceiling trick method and if it sticks, it's cooked just right. I think that's what al dente translates to in Englsh.
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Old 12-13-2012, 01:41 AM   #22
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Originally Posted by Whiskadoodle View Post
Does anyone use the old toss a noodle on the ceiling trick method and if it sticks, it's cooked just right. I think that's what al dente translates to in Englsh.
What it translates to is "to the tooth" as dente = dental. It is Italian. And no, I don't toss it on the ceiling, wall or anywhere else. I don't need another mess to clean up. I taste it. If the pasta has a little bite to it, then it is ready. Also, the longer you cook pasta, it becomes whiter and whiter. It loses that yellowish color. Then when it is all white, you know just by looking at it that it is done. Experienced cooks know this trick. They can tell just by looking at the pasta if it is done.
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Old 12-13-2012, 01:52 AM   #23
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I do the same thing but with real American cheese (Kraft Deli Deluxe) and the addition of a small diced onion sauted in the fat before adding the flour. The onion really makes a difference to me. I cover the top of the mac with slices of cheese and kraft parm to form a scab as we call it and fight for it.

I use non-fat milk and it still works fine. A pinch of granulated garlic sometimes too.

Gruyere melts so nice I think I will try a blend next time. Thanks! I usually use it for fondue only.
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Old 12-13-2012, 10:54 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by Chef Maloney View Post
jennyema, sorry you're so confused. It sounds like you've made something like this before so you should be able to figure it out.
Won't you please post your recipe? I'm sure we'd all love to see it
I'm not confused at all :-)

But the recipe is very confusing especially for a beginner cook because it calls for 5 tablespoons of butter and only 1T of flour. And there are no clear directions about how the butter is to be used in terms of quantities.

I have already made my point about the fact that no matter what, using only 1T of butter is not the correct ratio for bechemel sauce, which is the base for a non-custard mac and cheese.

BUT... Thanks for asking for my recipe! It's a lot like yours but with proper ratios. And double the quantity. I top it with a 1:1 bread crumbs and Parmigiano-Reggiano combined into a sandy texture with lots of melted butter.

I already posted it and you quoted it in your post above!

I usually use a mixture of cheeses, including some gruyere. I don't like using all gruyere, even though it's my favorite cheese. If you use only one type of cheese the end product can be too one note. I usually use a four cheese blend. Sometimes more, depending on what cheese leftovers are in my fridge.

My mac and cheese is a popular item on my catering menu, so I make it a lot.

Will be making it for Christmas Dinner, in fact.
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Old 12-14-2012, 12:38 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by Junie View Post
But I do see the amount of butter to use right at the top. Maybe its not a correct ratio for bechemel sauce. I don't think it is one cause I don't see the word bechemel in there anywhere. It must just be right for the recipe. We liked it that way. anyway we liked it and it came out good you should make it. good luck.
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I amm sorry jennyemma Addie told me and I dont want to hurt your feelings ever. I really like looking at your recipes on here and I don't want to get deleted like Addie said when she sent me the message on here. I didnt mean to critacize you ever I reallymean it. I just want to be as good of a cook as you some day and respectd like Addie says. so please don't be mad at me.I am sorry.I hope you show me some more recipes please dont stop
Junie, Jennyema is not confused at all So nice of you to apologize to jennyema because you felt you may have offended her, although I agree with Dawgluver that there was no need to apologize. You are correct, it is not a bechemel sauce. Glad you enjoyed the recipe. You are a sweetheart
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Old 12-14-2012, 06:06 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by 4meandthem View Post
I do the same thing but with real American cheese (Kraft Deli Deluxe)
For a moment I thought you were referring to the discussion above your post about tossing noodles on the ceiling.

As a huge mac & cheese fan I am always on the lookout for different ways to put a new spin on such a yummy dish. And Gruyere has such a nice texture - definitely saving this recipe to try out!
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Old 03-02-2016, 06:34 AM   #27
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Many of these macaroni and cheese recipes are baked

25 Insane Macaroni and Cheese Recipes You Shouldn't Live Your Life Without
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Old 03-03-2016, 06:45 PM   #28
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Many of these macaroni and cheese recipes are baked

25 Insane Macaroni and Cheese Recipes You Shouldn't Live Your Life Without
Saved and thanks. I like to mix cheeses and add lobster or crab.
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Old 03-04-2016, 02:43 AM   #29
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I made what I thought was a good baked macaroni and cheese dish, but when I took it out of the oven, all the cheese was gone. I mean, it was on the noodles and all, but I had wanted some some sauce at the bottom of the dish.

I had used 1 cup of macaroni and 2 cups of milk, so do I really need to up the milk to 4 cups?
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Old 03-04-2016, 09:57 AM   #30
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I made what I thought was a good baked macaroni and cheese dish, but when I took it out of the oven, all the cheese was gone. I mean, it was on the noodles and all, but I had wanted some some sauce at the bottom of the dish.

I had used 1 cup of macaroni and 2 cups of milk, so do I really need to up the milk to 4 cups?
How did you make it? Describe the process.
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Baked Macaroni & Cheese I've never been a big fan of macaroni & cheese but when I found this gourmet french version 25 years ago I changed my mind. So easy. This can be made ahead of time, refrigerated, and baked later. [FONT=Century Gothic][SIZE=3][COLOR=darkorange][/COLOR][/SIZE][/FONT] [FONT=Century Gothic][SIZE=3][COLOR=#ff8c00][B]BAKED MACARONI & CHEESE[/B][/COLOR][/SIZE][/FONT] [FONT=Century Gothic][SIZE=3][COLOR=#ff8c00][/COLOR][/SIZE][/FONT] [FONT=Century Gothic][SIZE=3][COLOR=black]1/2 Lb. Macaroni, cooked & drained (like elbow)[/COLOR][/SIZE][/FONT] [FONT=Century Gothic][SIZE=3][/SIZE][/FONT] [FONT=Century Gothic][SIZE=3]3 Tblsp. Butter[/SIZE][/FONT] [FONT=Century Gothic][SIZE=3]1 Tblsp. Flour[/SIZE][/FONT] [FONT=Century Gothic][SIZE=3]2 cups Milk[/SIZE][/FONT] [FONT=Century Gothic][SIZE=3]Salt & Pepper to taste[/SIZE][/FONT] [FONT=Century Gothic][SIZE=3]1/8 tsp. Nutmeg[/SIZE][/FONT] [FONT=Century Gothic][SIZE=3][/SIZE][/FONT] [FONT=Century Gothic][SIZE=3]1 cup Gruyere Cheese, grated[/SIZE][/FONT] [FONT=Century Gothic][SIZE=3]2 Tblsp. Butter[/SIZE][/FONT] [FONT=Century Gothic][SIZE=3][/SIZE][/FONT] [FONT=Century Gothic][SIZE=3]Cook the Macaroni according to package directions. Drain. Toss in a little Butter & Stir to keep it from sticking together. [/SIZE][/FONT] [FONT=Century Gothic][SIZE=3]Set Aside.[/SIZE][/FONT] [FONT=Century Gothic][SIZE=3][/SIZE][/FONT] [FONT=Century Gothic][SIZE=3]Melt the Butter in a pot, Whisk in the Flour, Cook and stir for 2-3 minutes to remove the flour taste. [/SIZE][/FONT] [FONT=Century Gothic][SIZE=3]Pour in the Milk. Whisking, until it comes to a boiL. The Sauce will be fairly thin. Add the Salt, Pepper & Nutmeg.[/SIZE][/FONT] [FONT=Century Gothic][SIZE=3]Turn Off the Heat.[/SIZE][/FONT] [FONT=Century Gothic][SIZE=3]Stir-In 2/3 of the Gruyere. Stir until Cheese is Melted.[/SIZE][/FONT] [FONT=Century Gothic][SIZE=3]Stir in the cooked Macaroni.[/SIZE][/FONT] [FONT=Century Gothic][SIZE=3]Pour Into a Buttered Baking Dish.[/SIZE][/FONT] [FONT=Century Gothic][SIZE=3]Top w/remaining Gruyere. Dot w/Butter[/SIZE][/FONT] [FONT=Century Gothic][SIZE=3][/SIZE][/FONT] [FONT=Century Gothic][SIZE=3]Bake for approximately 20 minutes, 425 degrees, until top is Browned.[/SIZE][/FONT] [FONT=Century Gothic][SIZE=3][/SIZE][/FONT] 5 stars 1 reviews
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