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Old 11-23-2014, 04:59 PM   #1
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Bean stock

If you google bean stock you get stuff about bean soup or yuppie coffee places. If you cook beans very often you know sometimes there's more liquid than you need. That liquid is bean stock and I can't understand why it is so under appreciated. The cooking shows say strain your canned beans and throw that disgusting liquid away. That's the kind of stuff that really irks me.

Last night I made a stew that turned out to be variation on jambalaya. Among the substitutions/additions were pinto beans and the stock it was cooked in.

So nearly every recipe calls for chicken stock. What's wrong with bean stock? I've previously asked the same question about pork stock. All these cooking shows and forums are great, but there seems to be a tendency to fads, leaving a lot of good stuff out of the conversation.

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Old 11-23-2014, 05:19 PM   #2
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I think it's because the gaseousness (is that a word?) has long been believed to be in the bean water/stock, and discarding it has long been thought to reduce the musical side effects. I rinse my canned black beans, but apparently it's not necessary.
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Old 11-24-2014, 03:12 AM   #3
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When I used to make my own baked beans, I first would rinse and then soaked them overnight. That water got drained. I then cooked them in fresh water until the skins would burst upon blowing on them. Those too got drained but the water was saved. When I layered and placed the beans in the bean pot, once everything was in the pot, I then took the cooking water and used that in the pot until the beans were covered. I saved any that was left over and replenished the liquid as needed during the rest of the cooking time. That cooking water was never wasted. There are a lot of nutrients in that water along with flavor.
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Old 11-24-2014, 03:52 AM   #4
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I always use the liquid from home cooked beans to make a small pot of soup. The bean liquid makes a nice base for minestrone. I try not to buy canned beans, I prefer to cook a pound or two and freeze them in two cup containers. When I do use canned beans sometimes I rinse them and sometimes I don't. Rinsing the canned beans helps to remove some of the sodium. When I use canned beans in a salad I give them a quick rinse with boiling water and a squirt of lemon juice or vinegar to remove the tin can taste that some brands of beans pick up. I use the liquid from canned beans when I make chili or beans & greens.

I never make fresh pork stock, but the bones and scraps of pork always go into something.

I really make an effort to use everything I buy. It really bothers me to see how much of the food we buy gets tossed into the trash for one reason or another. At my house it's mostly eggshells and coffee grounds! I've got my eye on those eggshells, in some cook books they talk about freezing the eggshells and adding them to the stock pot.
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Old 11-24-2014, 04:22 AM   #5
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Many moons ago, I read a question that stated, "What are the two healthiest things in your home?"

The answer was so simple, yet so true. The kitchen sink, think of all the liquids we pour down there. Liquids from canned veggies, leftover soup, etc. And the trash can. Self-explanatory. What doesn't fit down the drain, goes into the trash can.
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Old 11-24-2014, 04:42 AM   #6
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I try to use a lot of the ' left over liquids' in soups and stocks. For example, the water after boiling corn on the cob, the water after boiling the cabbage for making stuffed cabbage , bean water , The mushroom water after marinating portobellos with garlic and other herbs ( makes a great mushroom stock).

I agree that the cooking shows usually tend to the fads, which is kinda why I've cut back from watching many of them. I find the older, less trendy cooks/ cooking shows to be more frugal with their ingredients. And I also get similar advice from this forum due to the large demographic differences of people here ( Age, experiences, Geographic, cultural...)
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Old 11-24-2014, 04:46 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aunt Bea View Post
I always use the liquid from home cooked beans to make a small pot of soup. The bean liquid makes a nice base for minestrone. I try not to buy canned beans, I prefer to cook a pound or two and freeze them in two cup containers. When I do use canned beans sometimes I rinse them and sometimes I don't. Rinsing the canned beans helps to remove some of the sodium. When I use canned beans in a salad I give them a quick rinse with boiling water and a squirt of lemon juice or vinegar to remove the tin can taste that some brands of beans pick up. I use the liquid from canned beans when I make chili or beans & greens.

I never make fresh pork stock, but the bones and scraps of pork always go into something.

I really make an effort to use everything I buy. It really bothers me to see how much of the food we buy gets tossed into the trash for one reason or another. At my house it's mostly eggshells and coffee grounds! I've got my eye on those eggshells, in some cook books they talk about freezing the eggshells and adding them to the stock pot.
Hmmmmmm...egg shells, how much was that last bottle of calcium tablets I bought?
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Old 11-24-2014, 04:59 AM   #8
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My eggshells either get fed to the chickens ( they love them), or placed in the ground when I plant tomatoes to add calcium to the soil and hopefully reduce the risk of blossom rot. Most of our unused scraps also get sent to the chickens, which in turn gives me fresh eggs and fertilizer for the garden

Last year there was an exhibit on food at the Museum of Natural History in NYC. It covered many things from many different countries and cultures. USA sure does waste a lot of food. But , when the tour guide tried to guilt us on wasting food, my daughter gave him our chicken reply. He was impressed.
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Old 11-24-2014, 05:05 AM   #9
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No chickens, no garden...
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Old 11-24-2014, 09:19 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by larry_stewart View Post
I try to use a lot of the ' left over liquids' in soups and stocks. For example, the water after boiling corn on the cob, the water after boiling the cabbage for making stuffed cabbage , bean water , The mushroom water after marinating portobellos with garlic and other herbs ( makes a great mushroom stock).

I agree that the cooking shows usually tend to the fads, which is kinda why I've cut back from watching many of them. I find the older, less trendy cooks/ cooking shows to be more frugal with their ingredients. And I also get similar advice from this forum due to the large demographic differences of people here ( Age, experiences, Geographic, cultural...)
So right Larry. When you soak to rehydrate mushrooms and then strain the liquid, you have such intense mushroom flavor. The only time I watch any of the TV food shows now are on Saturday morning. ATK, Cook's Country, and Jacques Pepin are the only ones I now watch.
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