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Old 01-05-2006, 08:03 AM   #11
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I don't know why, but beans rarely give me any gas problems. Maybe it's because I've always had a relatively high fiber diet. The only fresh food that gives me any problems is if I eat too many raw blueberries. That gives you more than a gas problem though.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 01-05-2006, 10:16 AM   #12
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Beans

This topic is one of 'great' concern in our house especially in the winter! I only wish I knew all this sooner. Our family eats salads everyday for lunch. Still when I serve the beans esperience the gas. That doesn't deter us from eating them as we know how beneficial they are for the body. We do eat our cornbread with them. Kind of like a staple in our menu. Since Aurora gave such indepth information pertaining to the beans I do question what Barbarainnc has to say. aurora must be on same thought I do about the salt. Everything we eat has salt in it. No wonder all the blood pressure problems. Trying to salvage the leftover ham from Christmas has been a real challenge for me as I don't include it in hardly any of our meals. We don't miss the ham even though they all like it. Adding extra seasoning to the beans is only making them more appetizing to the pallet. Same way with salads. Would be better if one could just eat alone. Way we think and what we can do are two different things.

Thanks for sharing all this valuable information. As I said, beans are a 'regular' smell or no smell. Don't you think people are overdoing things with smell anyway? The people on tv sure talk about it enough. Supposedly a healthy sign according to my doctor. He told my mother when she was around to 'let them fly'! That will stick in my memory for sure.

Thanks again.
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Old 01-05-2006, 11:24 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Barbara L
To help prevent gas, my mom used to bring the beans to a boil with some baking soda added. Then she drained and rinsed them and continued to cook them with fresh water. It seemed to help. Barbara
Baking soda is supposed to destroy some of the B vitamins in dried beans.

An alternative solution to "the bean problem" is to add a 2-3inch piece of kombu or kelp (both are kinds of dried seaweed) to the cooking pot. People concerned about salt content should be aware that the powdery substance on the seaweed is salty and adjust appropriately. It pretty much dissolves in the beans over prolonged cooking. I use it sometimes - I don't know if it helps but it does add flavor.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aurora
Quote:
Originally Posted by Barbarainnc
I teach Foods 1 and we just talked about legumes/beans today. Only buy what you'll use in 1 month. They still dry out as you keep them. Store in a dry, dark, cool place.
Personally, I buy pinto beans in 25 lb. resealable plastic bags for about $9.00 and use them within 6 to 8 months. The first beans used are every bit as good as the last. What am I missing?
Thanks Aurora for all those interesting facts about dried beans you gave in your post!

I don't buy in quite the quantity that you do but I too find that dried beans certainly last more than one month if stored properly and, like you, I find that the only difference is that beans held a long time need a little longer cooking time due to the (small) moisture loss.
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Old 01-05-2006, 11:41 AM   #14
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Sometimes really old beans never soften when cooked. I think that's the point. You often see recommendations to buy beans from places like health food stores that have high turnover.

If you have hard water, often beans have a hard time softening, as well. That's one of the reasons you use baking soda -- to soften the water.

Acid ingredients also inhibit softening.

People claim that salt also inhibits softening, but most food scientists say that this is not true and recommend seasoning beans.

The components in beans that make you fart are partially dissolved in water, which is why you should change the soaking water if this is an issue for you.
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Old 01-05-2006, 12:06 PM   #15
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Would that be the soluble fiber that gives flatulence? If so, then I would think that puting up with the gas for the benefits of the fiber would be a no brainer. The fiber helps control blood sugar, and has beneficial prperties for the entire digestive tract as well.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 01-05-2006, 12:12 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Goodweed of the North
Would that be the soluble fiber that gives flatulence? If so, then I would think that puting up with the gas for the benefits of the fiber would be a no brainer. The fiber helps control blood sugar, and has beneficial prperties for the entire digestive tract as well.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North

Ask the other people in the elevator!

I don't think its soluable fiber -- it's sugars. The problem is oligosaccharides in the beans. They are very hard for most humans to digest, so they pass through to the large intestine undigested and normal digestive tract bacteria start feeding on them which produces fermentation and, thus, gas.

The oligosaccharides supposedly dissolve to some extent in soaking water. So changing the soaking water will rid yourself of some of the indigestable stuff. Cooking in the soaking water without changing it will mean you'll still ingest them.
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Old 01-05-2006, 12:19 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Goodweed of the North
Would that be the soluble fiber that gives flatulence?
The gas which is a by-product of eating beans is caused by the lack of natural enzymes in the intestinal tract to digest complex sugars called oligosaccharides.

The gas is produced in the intestinal tract by bacteria which are busy digesting these oligosaccharides and produce gas as a result.

Here is a site which covers the beans and flatulence topic quite nicely and also discusses the various possible ways to solve the problem when cooking and eating beans.

http://la.essortment.com/gastintestinal_rvgh.htm

One cooking tip to avoid the gas is to include certain herbs and spices in the cooking process which will neutralize the gas effect. Epizote is one such ingredient.
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Old 01-05-2006, 12:35 PM   #18
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Thanks for sharing.

This is better than watching any cooking show. They show you the dishes to make but would you think they would inform you of all this knowledge? Glad you are all here. I am going to start a book with all this to make sure I won't forget. I figure if it's the effort I make to put it together I will appreciate it more and I won't have to go to Borders and buy it. thanks for sharing.
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Old 01-05-2006, 06:22 PM   #19
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Here's an article that explains a lot...

http://science.howstuffworks.com/fra...ame=003124.htm


I think we'll just continue to play fart football.
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Old 01-05-2006, 06:52 PM   #20
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I think we'll just continue to play fart football

That is different! I am thankful I read ALL of the post. would have missed this before. Where did you hear that one from?
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