"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Pasta, Rice, Beans, Grains...
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 09-18-2006, 11:48 PM   #1
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 1
Best lasagna noodle?

What would you all say is your favorite brand of lasagna noodle? Which is the best one.

__________________

__________________
rogr23 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2006, 12:07 AM   #2
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Katie H's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: I live in the Heartland of the United States - Western Kentucky
Posts: 15,158
Best lasagna noodle? I would say the ones I make with my pasta machine. If you don't make your own pasta, then I'd say Barilla is pretty good. I'm quite surprised at how acceptable the "no boil" ones are in a pinch. But, homemade with semolina are just plain yummy. Don't let my comments intimidate you. It's just my husband and I that I have to please, so we're not feeding a family or trying to satisfy someone else's tastes.

Katie
__________________

__________________
Katie H is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2006, 01:01 AM   #3
Senior Cook
 
Seven S's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: N of the Equator, W of the Greenwich Meridian
Posts: 372
homemade is best... otherwise Barilla is good, and DeCecco should be better (i havent looked for it but all there pastas are exceptionally good)
__________________
Seven S is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2006, 01:11 AM   #4
Chef Extraordinaire
 
buckytom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: My mountain
Posts: 18,747
i really don't like barilla. i've found it rather flavorless, and the "al dente" thing is getting out of control. i don't like overly firm, nearly undercooked pasta.

most no boils i've tried are surprisingly good. it stands to reason that it sucks the moisture, and therefore flavor, out of the surrounding sauce and ingredients. just as you would finish a pasta in an accompanying sauce.
but you need to make sure every edge is covered by sauce , or a moist ingredient, or you'll get hard spots.
__________________
in nomine patri, et fili, et spiritus sancti.


Meh nom eh noh...doot dooooo do do do.
buckytom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2006, 01:22 AM   #5
Senior Cook
 
Seven S's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: N of the Equator, W of the Greenwich Meridian
Posts: 372
Quote:
Originally Posted by buckytom
the "al dente" thing is getting out of control. i don't like overly firm, nearly undercooked pasta.
"al dente" getting out of control? it is the way that generations upon generations of italians have eaten it, because it is the way pasta is meant to be eaten... not only that, it is more digestible when cooked properly, and it is in my own humble opinion, the most pleasurable vehicle to carry the sauce into my mouth, the texture of it feels perfect! it is indeed NEARLY undercooked like you say, but the point is that it isnt... the most pleasurable steak for me is also "nearly undercooked" like you say. "al dente" in english is merely an expression and perhaps even a "fashionable" expression, but in italian it is what it is and means what it means...
__________________
Seven S is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2006, 01:44 AM   #6
Chef Extraordinaire
 
buckytom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: My mountain
Posts: 18,747
would it be ok with you if i enjoyed my pasta the way i like it steven, italian history aside?

you may have misunderstood me. i like pasta cooked "properly", but since many have heard of the term al dente (to the bite), i've had poorly cooked pasta many times, always erring on the OVERLY undercooked side. it shouldn't be soft on the surface, but stick to your teeth in a dense center. you should be able to cleanly bite through it, with some resistance, but said resistance should be somewhat uniform.

btw, in your arguement, most of what you said is completely arbitrary. "meant to be cooked", "cooked properly", "texture of it feels perfect", "nearly undercooked...but to the point it isnt". all that does is describe how you like it.

also, comparing cooked steak to pasta is not even in the same ballpark, imo.
__________________
in nomine patri, et fili, et spiritus sancti.


Meh nom eh noh...doot dooooo do do do.
buckytom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2006, 02:00 AM   #7
Senior Cook
 
Seven S's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: N of the Equator, W of the Greenwich Meridian
Posts: 372
Quote:
Originally Posted by buckytom
would it be ok with you if i enjoyed my pasta the way i like it steven, italian history aside?
its ok with me, and i will enjoy mine cooked "al dente" italian history aside

Quote:
Originally Posted by buckytom
you may have misunderstood me. i like pasta cooked "properly", but since many have heard of the term al dente (to the bite), i've had poorly cooked pasta many times, always erring on the OVERLY undercooked side. it shouldn't be soft on the surface, but stick to your teeth in a dense center. you should be able to cleanly bite through it, with some resistance, but said resistance should be somewhat uniform.
buckytom, i understand what you are saying about undercooked pasta and i dont like it any more than you do... and so i must have misunderstood you, because "undercooked" pasta is definitely not "al dente" and by saying " 'al dente' getting out of control" i now gather you meant that everywhere people are using the term left and right loosely without really knowing what it means, not knowing where the center of the pasta goes from raw to cooked

Quote:
Originally Posted by buckytom
i like pasta cooked "properly"
btw, you also used an arbitrary argument!
__________________
Seven S is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2006, 02:16 AM   #8
Chef Extraordinaire
 
buckytom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: My mountain
Posts: 18,747
lol, yeah, i noticed that after i wrote it. it's tough to get around those. foodies are such passionate people.
__________________
in nomine patri, et fili, et spiritus sancti.


Meh nom eh noh...doot dooooo do do do.
buckytom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2006, 06:50 AM   #9
Sous Chef
 
Lynan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: New Zealand
Posts: 501
Send a message via MSN to Lynan
Definire il termine "AL DENTE" è praticamente impossibile. Direi che è bene attenersi ai tempi di cottura forniti dai fabbricanti.
E' comunque assolutamente necessario assaggiare la pasta due o tre volte nel corso della cottura.

Even Italians agree that it is practically impossible to define the term Al Dente. In the end, each individual has their own interpretation of ' to the tooth' and that is how it was during my years there. Some overcooked, some undercooked but that was only my opinion, the cook was always happy!
My husband prefers his pasta cooked longer than I like mine. So, we meet half way!

Sorry, I C&P'd the 1st paragraph and cant get rid of the underlines.
Looks pretty though.
__________________
In the book of life, the answers are NOT in the back.
Lynan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2006, 08:00 AM   #10
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 1,694
DeCecco hands down unless you make it. It is a thin noodle. If you live where there is a Hannaford's, their store brand is also a wonderful thin noodle.
__________________

__________________
Gretchen is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:20 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.