"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Pasta, Rice, Beans, Grains...
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 07-21-2011, 09:07 AM   #51
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,229
Classic Bechemel Sauce:
3 tbs. butter
3 tbs. al purpose flour
pinch of salt
Milk

In a saute' pan, melt the butter and add the flour and salt. A thin paste will form. Cook the paste over medium heat for about three minutes to remove the raw-flour flavor. While whisking, slowly add milk, a little at a time. At first, the roux will get super thick. As you wisk in more milk, it will begin to thin into a rich white sauce. When it has reached the thickness you desire (it should coat a spoon that is dipped in it) add just a pinch of nutmeg. This is Bechemel Sauce, one of the 5 mother sauces. To make Mornay sauce, add grated Gruyere cheese and stir until smooth. The best way to do this is to have the cheese at room temperature. Remove the sauce from the heat source, and slowly stir in the cheese.

Many people add grated Parmesano Regiano to the Bechemel for a version of Alfredo Sauce. Very sharp cheddar is typically used for mac and cheese, or some combination of cheeses that includes very sharp cheddar.

The roux can also be used to bind soups, and is the base for Veloute Sauce, where a chicken, veal, or pork stock is added to make thin the roux into a sauce.

If you remove a roux from heat and quickly stir in raw eggs, you end up with choux paste, from which eclairs, profiteroles, and puffs are made.

Roux is a wonderful thing. You just have to keep dairy products from reaching temperatures in excess of 175' to prevent them from breaking.

Oh, and a classic example of a roux based sauce uses sausage grease and milk. Fry bulk sausage in a pan. Add 3 tbs. of flour to the sausage, along with 1/2 tsp. ground pepper. Then, after cooking for a couple of minutes, slowly stir in milk until you get a wonderful gravy. Add a bit of rubbed sage and cook for another minutes. You now have that famous southern dish, sausage gravy, which is served over biscuits.

Check out my blog for a more detailed explanation of the properties of fat, flour, and liquid.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
__________________

__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2011, 09:32 AM   #52
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Metro New York
Posts: 8,764
Send a message via Yahoo to ChefJune
Quote:
Originally Posted by Goodweed of the North View Post
Classic Bechemel Sauce:
3 tbs. butter
3 tbs. al purpose flour
pinch of salt
Milk

In a saute' pan, melt the butter and add the flour and salt. A thin paste will form. Cook the paste over medium heat for about three minutes to remove the raw-flour flavor. While whisking, slowly add milk, a little at a time. At first, the roux will get super thick. As you wisk in more milk, it will begin to thin into a rich white sauce. When it has reached the thickness you desire (it should coat a spoon that is dipped in it) add just a pinch of nutmeg. This is Bechemel Sauce, one of the 5 mother sauces. To make Mornay sauce, add grated Gruyere cheese and stir until smooth. The best way to do this is to have the cheese at room temperature. Remove the sauce from the heat source, and slowly stir in the cheese.

Many people add grated Parmesano Regiano to the Bechemel for a version of Alfredo Sauce. Very sharp cheddar is typically used for mac and cheese, or some combination of cheeses that includes very sharp cheddar.

The roux can also be used to bind soups, and is the base for Veloute Sauce, where a chicken, veal, or pork stock is added to make thin the roux into a sauce.

If you remove a roux from heat and quickly stir in raw eggs, you end up with choux paste, from which eclairs, profiteroles, and puffs are made.

Roux is a wonderful thing. You just have to keep dairy products from reaching temperatures in excess of 175' to prevent them from breaking.

Oh, and a classic example of a roux based sauce uses sausage grease and milk. Fry bulk sausage in a pan. Add 3 tbs. of flour to the sausage, along with 1/2 tsp. ground pepper. Then, after cooking for a couple of minutes, slowly stir in milk until you get a wonderful gravy. Add a bit of rubbed sage and cook for another minutes. You now have that famous southern dish, sausage gravy, which is served over biscuits.

Check out my blog for a more detailed explanation of the properties of fat, flour, and liquid.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
Very good, GW! but can I tell you how many times I've made BechAmel Sauce with a whole lot more flour and butter than 3 Tablespoons? And you didn't suggest an amount of milk that corresponds to those 3 Tablespoons. For 3 Tablespoons, 2 cups of milk will be all the sauce will hold. but you wrote your recipe very clearly. I wasn't being snide when I said "Very good! "
__________________

__________________
Wine is the food that completes the meal.
ChefJune is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2011, 12:09 PM   #53
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,229
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChefJune View Post
Very good, GW! but can I tell you how many times I've made BechAmel Sauce with a whole lot more flour and butter than 3 Tablespoons? And you didn't suggest an amount of milk that corresponds to those 3 Tablespoons. For 3 Tablespoons, 2 cups of milk will be all the sauce will hold. but you wrote your recipe very clearly. I wasn't being snide when I said "Very good! "
For the size meals I prepare, 3 tbs is about the correct amount of fat and flour that I require. I purosely didn't give the milk amount as that can be gauged simply by adding milk and stirring over heat until the right consistancy is reached, no matter the amount of fat and flour. I do the same thing when making pie crusts. I put in the amount flour and salt required for whatever it is that I'm making, then add lard and cut in, a little at a time, until I get the pea-gravel consistancy i'm looking for. The flour and fat can be worked indefinitely without making the crust tough as the gluten doesn't form until liquid is added. This makes my pie crusts, and my bechemel based sauces fool proof.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2011, 02:19 PM   #54
Master Chef
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston
Posts: 9,281
For mac and cheese i usually start with 5T of each.

The sauce can be made anywhere from a cream soup to almost a paste, depending on its end use. Add liquid accordingly.

For mac and cheese I always make the sauce pretty thin.

And use a lot of cheese.
__________________
Less is not more. More is more and more is fabulous.
jennyema is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2011, 02:25 PM   #55
Master Chef
 
Snip 13's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Brakpan, South Africa
Posts: 5,431
I'm sure we all know how to make a bechemel by now, wasn't the question how not to make a roux? lol!
__________________
Odette
"I used to jog but the ice cubes kept falling out of my glass."

"I hear voices and they don't like you "
Snip 13 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2011, 03:19 PM   #56
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,229
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snip 13 View Post
I'm sure we all know how to make a bechemel by now, wasn't the question how not to make a roux? lol!
Reading between the lines, the op stated that his cheese sauce made with a roux failed. It came out lumpy. if the same technique were used, but with cream, or evaporated milk, the lumpy sauce problem would remain. I also added that to smoothly incorporate cheese into any sauce, the cheese should be grated and at room temperature, and the sauce should be removed from the heat source. Whether Bechemel, or cream is used, following the technique will result in a creamy and smooth cheese sauce for the mac and cheese. The rest of the info was provided because I love to help others learn new info and techniques. Now, the op has multiple options, each of which will produce a successful sauce.

I can't seem to help myself. That may be why BT dubbed me "Chief Longwind".

Seeeeeya; Godoweed of the North
__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2011, 03:50 PM   #57
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 4
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bigjim68 View Post
Most of the time, I don't bother with the milk. Just heavy whipping cream.
Does it come out ok? Any thickness issues?
__________________
Robert360 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2011, 11:33 PM   #58
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Richmond, Va
Posts: 1,229
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robert360 View Post
Does it come out ok? Any thickness issues?
For Mac and Cheese, heavy whipping cream is about right for my taste. Most important is keeping the temp of the cream right. Too hot and the sauce will break.

From the posts, there are as many ways to make mac and cheese as there are ways to cook a steak.
__________________
Bigjim68 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-22-2011, 12:06 AM   #59
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Dawgluver's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 24,146
Quote:
Originally Posted by Goodweed of the North

Reading between the lines, the op stated that his cheese sauce made with a roux failed. It came out lumpy. if the same technique were used, but with cream, or evaporated milk, the lumpy sauce problem would remain. I also added that to smoothly incorporate cheese into any sauce, the cheese should be grated and at room temperature, and the sauce should be removed from the heat source. Whether Bechemel, or cream is used, following the technique will result in a creamy and smooth cheese sauce for the mac and cheese. The rest of the info was provided because I love to help others learn new info and techniques. Now, the op has multiple options, each of which will produce a successful sauce.

I can't seem to help myself. That may be why BT dubbed me "Chief Longwind".

Seeeeeya; Godoweed of the North
I found your posts to be very helpful, GW! Stuff I did not know otherwise! Thanks!
__________________
She who dies with the most toys, wins.
Dawgluver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-22-2011, 01:26 AM   #60
Master Chef
 
Snip 13's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Brakpan, South Africa
Posts: 5,431
Quote:
Originally Posted by Goodweed of the North View Post
Reading between the lines, the op stated that his cheese sauce made with a roux failed. It came out lumpy. if the same technique were used, but with cream, or evaporated milk, the lumpy sauce problem would remain. I also added that to smoothly incorporate cheese into any sauce, the cheese should be grated and at room temperature, and the sauce should be removed from the heat source. Whether Bechemel, or cream is used, following the technique will result in a creamy and smooth cheese sauce for the mac and cheese. The rest of the info was provided because I love to help others learn new info and techniques. Now, the op has multiple options, each of which will produce a successful sauce.

I can't seem to help myself. That may be why BT dubbed me "Chief Longwind".

Seeeeeya; Godoweed of the North
Yes Sir Chief Longwind!
But if you start teaching us how to boil an egg or cook rice I'm bunking your class
Thanks for reminding us how it's done :)
__________________

__________________
Odette
"I used to jog but the ice cubes kept falling out of my glass."

"I hear voices and they don't like you "
Snip 13 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
cheese, flour, other

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:57 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.