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Old 09-04-2019, 02:44 PM   #21
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Yes, in Europe this dish or similar ones are often made with crepes.
Lidia Bastianich of Lidia's Italian Kitchen TV series, also makes it with crepes.
That's to much work. LOL
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Old 09-04-2019, 02:53 PM   #22
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That's to much work. LOL
Right on !
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Old 09-04-2019, 05:16 PM   #23
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Personally, I would find it to be less work to make crepes than the homemade pasta.
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Old 09-04-2019, 05:32 PM   #24
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Personally, I would find it to be less work to make crepes than the homemade pasta.
You're absolutely right about that.

We were of course thinking & speaking of crepes vs. the store-bought, ready-made cannelloni tubes.
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Old 09-04-2019, 07:15 PM   #25
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You're absolutely right about that.

We were of course thinking & speaking of crepes vs. the store-bought, ready-made cannelloni tubes.
Yes, I realize that. It's just nice sometimes to do the homemade and easy way. I saw an episode of Pasta Grannies where the granny made lasagna using crepes. I thought it was a great idea to have as backup.
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Old 09-04-2019, 07:26 PM   #26
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Yes, I realize that. It's just nice sometimes to do the homemade and easy way. I saw an episode of Pasta Grannies where the granny made lasagna using crepes. I thought it was a great idea to have as backup.

Yes, I saw a TV show where the chef also made lasagna using crepes, which I thought was quite novel - and it looked and sounded like it was a very acceptable alternative approach to using pasta.
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Old 09-05-2019, 08:36 AM   #27
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I cooked it last night and it was a hit. My vegetarian daughter liked the fake meat version I made for her. I just took 4 of the shells to make for her with the fake meat crumbles. Would make the recipe again in the future. Here’s a picture of the cooked dish.
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Old 09-05-2019, 08:37 AM   #28
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And here it is plated.
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Old 09-05-2019, 09:54 AM   #29
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Wonderful - I'm real pleased it turned out well for you - your pics look great.
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Old 09-05-2019, 10:01 AM   #30
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Here are my notes/comments on the recipe.

My box of Manicotti shells (Barilla) only had 14 shells. It was sufficient for this recipe. I did boil them for 4 minutes as I thought 2 minutes might not be enough. The shells were still very firm.

I covered the pan with foil and baked it like I usually do for stuffed shells/lasagna. Then I uncovered it for the broiling part.

I used 1% milk and no cream. Cheeses were Guyere, Romana, and Parmesan Reggiano. I also used 100% italian sausage instead of the sausage/ground beef combo since that's what I had on hand.
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Old 09-05-2019, 10:28 AM   #31
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Here are my notes/comments on the recipe.

My box of Manicotti shells (Barilla) only had 14 shells. It was sufficient for this recipe. I did boil them for 4 minutes as I thought 2 minutes might not be enough. The shells were still very firm.

I covered the pan with foil and baked it like I usually do for stuffed shells/lasagna. Then I uncovered it for the broiling part.

I used 1% milk and no cream. Cheeses were Guyere, Romana, and Parmesan Reggiano. I also used 100% italian sausage instead of the sausage/ground beef combo since that's what I had on hand.
Glad you mentioned how you handled cooking the manicotti shells - as I said they are quite a bit thicker than the cannelloni tubes, and have ridges too, so I can understand their remaining somewhat firm - (so need more parboiling to adequately soften them up).

I think you'd be pleased with the thinner cannelloni tubes if you can find them.

And yes, I've also used 100% Italian sausage meat - using the 'mild' only, then the 'spicy' only - and I think the spicy meat makes a tastier cannelloni - it isn't hot at all, and seems to have a more pleasing flavor to me.

Next time, try baking it uncovered all the way.

For a change of pace, you might like to give the 'killer chicken thighs' a try sometime in future.
I'm very pleased with that dish's taste, and I think your family would enjoy it too.
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Old 09-06-2019, 07:26 AM   #32
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This recipe sounds so rich that I think I gained a pound or three just reading it! Thanks for sharing.




These two comments sent me down a rabbit hole From what I could find, it's likely that the first tubular pasta dish was made with rolled sheets of fresh lasagna pasta. The "Pasta Project" blogger also has a bit different explanation for cannelloni/manicotti/crespelle than that of the blogger with the "View from My Italian Kitchen". While Jacqui Debono's recipe for "Pumpkin and Goat Cheese" cannelloni looks good, I should try make the one filled with potato and porcini. Our daughter's two favorite food groups are pasta and potatoes. A dish that marries the two? Perfect!
We often make these and manicotti with crepes. saves on rolling out the dough with the pasta machine.
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Old 09-06-2019, 07:38 AM   #33
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I actually find it easier to work with crepes or fresh pasta dough than to have to parboil, cool and then wrestle with the tubes, keep them from tearing, collapsing, filling falling out of bottom, etc. With the crepes or pasta dough, you just spoon or pipe out the filling, roll and you're done. The crepe batter and dough are both made ahead preferably and it takes no time to cook crepes or roll out the dough.

Ohhh, CG, I want to make the porcini and potato ones too. I prefer the simpler, cleaner tasting fillings.

We usually just use a cheese filling, sometimes add meat, but I don't like them as much, though Craig does. Sometimes, I make crepes and fold them in quarters, like crepes suzette, tucking in triangular wedges of moz and Fontina, covered with a simple red sauce, then baked until cheese is melty.
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CANNELLONI - my go to favorite pasta recipe! THE PASTA: Some Italian food lovers would choose to make their own fresh pasta for this dish, or cut & roll up fresh pasta sheets - the ones generally used for making lasagna, but I almost always take the simple route of using a box of store-bought, so-called 'oven-ready', cannelloni tubes. These are 'hard' out of the box and can easily break up/splinter if not carefully handled, so one should parboil them first for approx. 2 minutes max - so that they soften up a bit, but are still firm enough to retain their shape and are easily stuffed with the filling, and will be of the right consistency upon baking. A box of these cannelloni tubes contains at or near 2 dozen pieces, which is roughly the number this recipe will make. After stuffing, any tubes unused that day can be frozen for later use when their taste will be every bit as good as the fresh ones. All one needs to do is to fresh make a bechamel sauce each time you use any from the frozen batch. THE FILLING - Ingredients you'll need: To be sauteed: - Approx. 1/2 lb. each of spicy (or mild) italian sausage meat, and ground beef (or pork if you prefer). - 1/2 cup finely chopped onion or shallot. - 3-4 garlic cloves finely chopped. - 1 Tbspn. tomato paste. - 1/2 cup white wine (optional). - 1/2 jalapeno pepper, seeds/ribs removed & finely chopped. - 1 tspn. dry oregano. - 1/2 tspn. powdered nutmeg. - Large pinch of sugar - Some olive oil. In a large saucepan over medium heat, add a tbspn of olive oil & saute the diced onions (or shallots) for 1-2 minutes, add the diced garlic & fry for another minute, then gradually add the meats and saute until cooked through, while occasionally breaking up the meat with a potato masher to ensure uniform small ground consistency. Then add the white wine, if using, along with the tomato paste, the diced jalapeno pepper, the oregano, the nutmeg, and the sugar - mix all ingredients well while saute-ing for a further 5 minutes or so. Remove from heat, drain through a sieve to remove excess fat/liquids, and allow to cool. To be added cold in a large bowl along with the above mixture after it has been cooked, drained and cooled: - 1 -500 gram tub of ricotta cheese, preferably creamy full fat. - 1/2 cup of coarsely grated provolone ( or substitute gruyere, swiss, cheddar, - whatever cheese you have on hand or prefer). - 1/3 - 1/2 cup finely grated Romano cheese (or Parmesan). - 2 Tbspns. Cream Cheese. - 1/3 - 1/2 cup of fresh basil leaves, coarsely chopped or torn apart. - 1/2 small tin or jar of marinated & quartered artichoke hearts, coarsely chopped. - 1 egg, for binding Mix all ingredients well together to form the completed filling for the cannelloni tubes. If the mixture seems too heavily 'dryish', mix in a little milk or cream to soften/moisten & better facilitate filling the tubes. Use a piping bag for filling each tube, or a ziplock bag with a hole cut into the bottom corner for piping, or just use your fingers like I do - works just as fast and well. The simple Bechamel Sauce: Ingredients: In a small to medium-sized saucepan over medium heat: - Melt 1 Tbspn. butter. - Add 2 tspns. flour & whisk together well till bubbling. - Add 1/4 tspn. each of white pepper and ground nutmeg. - Begin gradually adding 2/3 to 1 cup, or more, of milk, whisking well as the sauce thickens somewhat - approx. 2-3 minutes or so. - Gradually add approx. 2/3 cup coarsely grated provolone or other good melting cheese of your choice, along with approx. 1/2 cup finely grated romano, or parmesan cheese, and whisk in until melted and well blended. The finished white sauce needs to be quite watery, in order to remain of this consistency, more or less, as a finished baked product, with no curdling. The sauce consistency should be no thicker consistency than say, heavy cream, or even slightly less so. If it is not, add milk & whisk till that consistency is achieved. This is important. Allow to cool. Baking: Line up rows of filled cannelloni tubes, closely side by side, as many as you wish to bake in an oven-proof corning ware casserole dish of the size needed for the number of cannelloni you're baking. Completely cover the cannelloni with the bechamel sauce, adding more milk or cream if need be, and sprinkle another 1/2 cup of grated romano cheese over top of the sauce. Bake @ 350 degrees for 25 minutes or so, & then finish by turning on the broiler for 2 minutes or so to nicely brown the topping of romano cheese. ENJOY ! 3 stars 1 reviews
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