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Old 09-05-2016, 04:04 PM   #61
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The romance of that wood burning stove is just that....Getting up in the middle of the night to keep the fire going was never any fun. There was never anything romantic about it. Just ask someone who lives in a log cabin in the far woods of Alaska.
Addie, sometimes romance is far more important than comfort. While I greatly admire and respect historical reenactors who go full-steam-ahead with their love of the challenge living, working and eating like their 18th century counterpart, there is no way you could get me to spend a weekend at a Civil War Encampment on a chilly, damp autumn, interacting with people from our century as if we were the oddity. It takes real stamina and determination to do that short of thing and call it "fun".

Those who work at places like Plimoth Plantation or Williamsburg get to be modern as soon as the clock strikes closing time. Now that's the kind of thing I could do - stir the pot of cider while explaining the process in colonial-speak. That's more like theatre and acting. To me, THAT is fun!

Different strokes for different folks...
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Old 09-05-2016, 05:44 PM   #62
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Addie, sometimes romance is far more important than comfort. While I greatly admire and respect historical reenactors who go full-steam-ahead with their love of the challenge living, working and eating like their 18th century counterpart, there is no way you could get me to spend a weekend at a Civil War Encampment on a chilly, damp autumn, interacting with people from our century as if we were the oddity. It takes real stamina and determination to do that short of thing and call it "fun".

Those who work at places like Plimoth Plantation or Williamsburg get to be modern as soon as the clock strikes closing time. Now that's the kind of thing I could do - stir the pot of cider while explaining the process in colonial-speak. That's more like theatre and acting. To me, THAT is fun!

Different strokes for different folks...
And I guess she missed the part about his fantasy kitchen having people who cut the wood and stoke the fire for him!

CG, come on down to Virginia and put on a lovely Colonial-era dress covering you from shoulders to shoes. Stirring the laundry over a boiling cauldron in the summer looks like great fun I admire them for that dedication, too.
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Old 09-05-2016, 10:05 PM   #63
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I would LOVE to live near Williamsburg, GG! Not IN it, since I know how restrictive the requirements are for keeping things authentic. Only one thing...you need to figure out how to make the Tidewater region not humid during the summer.
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Old 09-05-2016, 11:11 PM   #64
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I would LOVE to live near Williamsburg, GG! Not IN it, since I know how restrictive the requirements are for keeping things authentic. Only one thing...you need to figure out how to make the Tidewater region not humid during the summer.
If only I could think of a way...
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Old 09-08-2016, 11:20 PM   #65
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I would love a wood stove, and I would cut the wood and stoke it. I actually do know how much work is involved in that. And yeah GG, I have cooked in an reenactor Civil War Camp, did it with a friend, wife bowed out, she is good camping, but to quote her, 'yes I want our tent, our gore-tex, and our modern sleeping bags'. And she was kind of right on that, I do prefer outdoors when tempered with tech.

There are some Civil War reenactor, cooks that don't understand a dutch oven. Looking at you William and Chet....

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Old 09-09-2016, 01:36 AM   #66
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Fox, I have a feeling you would like the recipe I've posted for Sheep Stew, from a book about the county where my ancestors lived. I'll see if I can find it...
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Old 09-09-2016, 01:37 AM   #67
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Ah, here it is: Dundas Sheep Stew
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Old 09-09-2016, 02:16 AM   #68
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GG, needs more sheep.

It is a medieval approach to a recipe. That is a compliment.

I do love it. I would obviously today use much less sheep. It looks like a festival recipe, which is common in medieval and renaissance cookery. What we have recorded is when someone prepared a serious excess of consumables. It would like to look at our society by looking at MTV's 16 year old parties.
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Old 09-09-2016, 03:59 AM   #69
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Addie, sometimes romance is far more important than comfort. While I greatly admire and respect historical reenactors who go full-steam-ahead with their love of the challenge living, working and eating like their 18th century counterpart, there is no way you could get me to spend a weekend at a Civil War Encampment on a chilly, damp autumn, interacting with people from our century as if we were the oddity. It takes real stamina and determination to do that short of thing and call it "fun".

Those who work at places like Plimoth Plantation or Williamsburg get to be modern as soon as the clock strikes closing time. Now that's the kind of thing I could do - stir the pot of cider while explaining the process in colonial-speak. That's more like theatre and acting. To me, THAT is fun!

Different strokes for different folks...
That 'romance' dies real fast. After a while you find yourself cutting just enough for the immediate need. All the time you are praying someone comes and takes over the chore for you. There is a huge difference between cutting wood for a reenactment meal, and for keeping a family warm through a cold winter night.

Today, if you have a log splitter, it can make the chore go so much faster. In just a couple of hours, you can do enough wood to last a family for the whole winter. A lot of families have wood burning stoves to heat their homes today. Only they don't cut it by themselves. They buy it by the cord. Expensive, but so much less work.
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Old 09-09-2016, 06:14 AM   #70
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GG, needs more sheep.

It is a medieval approach to a recipe. That is a compliment.

I do love it. I would obviously today use much less sheep. It looks like a festival recipe, which is common in medieval and renaissance cookery. What we have recorded is when someone prepared a serious excess of consumables. It would like to look at our society by looking at MTV's 16 year old parties.
I believe it originated as a harvest-time shared meal in a close farming community in south-central Virginia. When my mom was growing up there in the '40s and '50s, town people made it every fall and sold pints to the public as a fundraiser for the local fire department.
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