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Old 02-28-2008, 03:27 PM   #1
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Chicken-stock pasta?

Can I make pasta using chicken-stock in the same way that I can with rice?

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Old 02-28-2008, 03:28 PM   #2
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Yes. I cook tortellini in chicken broth, add ground pepper and any veggies I like for really quick soup. It would be just as easy to drain and eat. :)
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Old 02-28-2008, 03:48 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CanadianMeg View Post
Yes. I cook tortellini in chicken broth, add ground pepper and any veggies I like for really quick soup. It would be just as easy to drain and eat. :)
So, how about if I cook a cup of macaroni in chicken stock, throw in chopped carrot, a handful of frozen peas and strips of sweetheart cabbage (things that I just happen to have). Is that soup? I also have potatoes and onions.

Can it be thickened with roux? I don't know what I'm doing...

What about liverwurst?
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Old 02-28-2008, 04:27 PM   #4
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The pasta will cook more quickly than the veggies. Potatoes will take even longer. For soup, I usually saute the veggies a bit, but you don't have to. Bring the stock to a boil with the veggies and add the pasta a few minutes before you are ready to serve. You can thicken with a little cornstarch mixed with cold water. Just pour it in at the end.

Note that the pasta will continue to cook in the soup, so if you are cooking more than you are going to eat at one sitting, you can either live with overcooked pasta (not the end of the world) or add pasta to the amount you are going to eat now, and reheat pasta with leftovers in the future.
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Old 02-28-2008, 07:00 PM   #5
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If your liverwurst is anything like the liverwurst we have in the US, it is a very soft sausage that would just fall apart in a boiling soup.

A harder sausage, like a kielbasa, would work very well. I know nothing of Dutch liver sausage.

Yep, you gotta add the stuff that takes longer to cook earlier in the process, such as carrots and potatoes, and then towards the end of cooking add frozen peas and cabbage. Depending upon how 'al dente' you want the peas and cabbage you can add them either earlier or later during the heating.

And the smaller you dice the carrots and onions the less time they will take to cook.

As has been posted you add the pasta generally last. If you are going to eat the soup in one fell swoop that is a great way to do it.

But if you want to save some, every time you heat it up again the pasta will become softer and eventually fall apart.

For a large soup endeavor you could cook the pasta separately, al dente, and then toss it in shortly before serving.

Just my take on things. Good luck. Hope we see you here soon.
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Old 02-29-2008, 03:15 AM   #6
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Agree with all of the above posters. And definitely no to the liverwurst. Have that spread on hot buttered toast as an appetiser to your soup! Liverwurst is yummy. Word of caution if you are cleaning out your fridge - liverwurst can be a good carrier for food poisoning, so if you think it has been there a while, you might be advised to just ditch it.
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Old 02-29-2008, 10:38 AM   #7
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If you're trying to get some protein, add a can of beans. They are a good source of protein and fiber. Also, if you are looking for cheap food, you can skip the stock all together, undrained even, if you want extra flavor. I sometimes don't use stock when I'm making vegetable soup because the ingredients for stock are in the soup. A can of tomatoes can also be a nice addition. You can spice it strictly with salt and pepper if you wish. Don't necessarilly do everything all at once, but you may consider them as options when playing around. A thrown together soup can be fast, nutritious and very good. And it really is hard to 'screw up'
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Old 02-29-2008, 11:03 AM   #8
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pasta in brodo (pasta cooked in broth)
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Old 02-29-2008, 11:17 AM   #9
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I just made a chicken and vegetables soup the other night. I made the pasta beforehand, and I used a combination frozen peas, carrots, and corn to add the last 6 minutes. Then threw everything into the pot to finish cooking--maybe 5 minutes at most. The chicken broth was authentic and I cooked it nearly 5 hours. That released all of the marrow from the chicken bones. It was wonderful. Biggest compliment was from my Russian maid. Ludmilla---she loved it. And they have some of the best soups that you will ever find anywhere. Just ask Charlie D.
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Old 02-29-2008, 08:43 PM   #10
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Hi Sean,
What are you trying to cook?

If the end result is to be a soup then use stock, for example pasta in brodo, tortellini in brodo, minestrone.

If the end result requires the pasta to be cooked, drained and then sauced then use water.

Hope this helps,
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