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Old 08-08-2014, 05:05 PM   #1
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Coconut Milk Arborio

Hopefully a simple question:

Will applying a socarrat to finish off a coconut milk based rice dish burn? I'm worried the sugar content could be an issue with high heat. I plan on cooking the rice with a 50/50 blend of chicken stock and coconut milk, then finishing off with a rendered chicken fat socarrat at the end for that perfect (hopefully) crunch. anyone ever do this with coconut milk? should I worry? I don't have time for an experimental try first because it's a dish I'm preparing now for a party in two hours.

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Old 08-08-2014, 05:44 PM   #2
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I can't answer your question because I don't know what socarrat is, but I typically don't make a brand-new, unusual recipe for the first time for a dinner party. Since you didn't experiment in advance, you're now about to experiment on your guests.
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Old 08-08-2014, 05:52 PM   #3
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Socarrat is simply applying a browning, crunchy finish to a rice dish, slightly caramelizing the rice to the bottom of a skillket with fat or oil. I've done it many, many times, but with coconut milk it adds a different dynamic and wanted to ask before trying. went for it and it's fine :)
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Old 08-09-2014, 12:36 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
I can't answer your question because I don't know what socarrat is, but I typically don't make a brand-new, unusual recipe for the first time for a dinner party. Since you didn't experiment in advance, you're now about to experiment on your guests.
Well I know what it is but I've never heard of anyone adding it at the end of cooking.

Socarrat is the crusty caramelisation you get at the bottom of a paella when you cook it properly (Making a paella "properly"? Am I mad? Lock a thousand Spanish cooks in a room and tell them to write out the recipe for a "proper" paella and you'll get a 1000 different recipes. ) It occurs naturally in the cooking and I don't know how you'd add it at the end as the OP seems to suggest.
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Old 08-09-2014, 12:45 PM   #5
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"it occurs naturally in the cooking." so does EVERYTHING. you add it at the end by not fully cooking the rice initially (to about al dente), then placing it in a pan with hot oil or rendered animal fat. the result is crusty deliciousness. yes, the term is derived specifically from paella dishes but you can socarrat any rice dish. I do it with jambalayas often. It certainly isn't a term or method exclusive to paellas.
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Old 08-09-2014, 01:05 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by jizdepski View Post
"it occurs naturally in the cooking." so does EVERYTHING. you add it at the end by not fully cooking the rice initially (to about al dente), then placing it in a pan with hot oil or rendered animal fat. the result is crusty deliciousness. yes, the term is derived specifically from paella dishes but you can socarrat any rice dish. I do it with jambalayas often. It certainly isn't a term or method exclusive to paellas.
I'm confused because I thought the crustiness occurred in the same pan while cooking the dish, with all the other ingredients - proteins, veggies and seasonings. I've never heard of making crusty rice in a separate pan and then adding it to the rest of the dish. Is that what you're doing?

btw, socarrat is a noun, not a verb.
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Old 08-09-2014, 01:59 PM   #7
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True socarrat is a noun...the verb being "socarrar" (to singe). With paella it is the final step. upping the heat in the pan and singeing the rice for a couple minutes and removing from heat before it comes to a burn. I did the exact same thing, only i didn't use the pot I cooked the rice in because to achieve the socarrat you need a shallow, wide metal or cast iron pot. Therefore, I transferred the mostly cooked saffron rice to the heated skillet to apply the finish. Superfluous perhaps, but a nice touch. Anyway, the original post was to see if anyone had any issues with the coconut milk I used to cook the rice scorching.
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Old 08-10-2014, 06:23 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by jizdepski View Post
"it occurs naturally in the cooking." so does EVERYTHING. you add it at the end by not fully cooking the rice initially (to about al dente), then placing it in a pan with hot oil or rendered animal fat. the result is crusty deliciousness. yes, the term is derived specifically from paella dishes but you can socarrat any rice dish. I do it with jambalayas often. It certainly isn't a term or method exclusive to paellas.
Then you should make yourself clear. I wasn't the only DCer to be confused about what you were asking. It sounded as though you were talking about making a crust on top of your dish after you had cooked it.

We aren't stupid but we aren't thought readers either.
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Old 08-10-2014, 06:28 PM   #9
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I assume you're not using sweetened coconut milk. Then you'd only have to deal with the natural sugars in the coconut milk.

As GG said. It's not a great idea to experiment on guests. Yes, you're asking us for help but it looks like no one has done this.
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