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Old 12-17-2018, 10:37 PM   #1
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Cooking rice with the “pasta method”

“How to cook rice” is most likely a good subject for tabling, considering the number of discussions there have been here the past few months. Rice cooker vs Instant Pot vs stovetop, etcetera etcetera.

One method I don’t think I’ve seen discussed though, is the “pasta method.” If you’re not familiar, you fill a large pot with water, add a good amount of salt, bring it to a boil and toss in the rice. Cook it until the grains are al dented or a bit softer, drain, add butter and serve. Times will vary depending on the variety of rice, but you don’t have to worry about water:rice ratios.

Thing is, I can’t see this working for short grain rice, at least if you want the rice Japanese style sticky.

Anyone tried this method? And what do you think about the short grain rice dilemma?

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Old 12-17-2018, 10:54 PM   #2
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Interesting use of the word table as a verb.

Tabling in America means to put something off until later.

Tabling in many other places means to bring to discussion.

I live in America, so I'll discuss this with you tomorrow or thereafter...
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Old 12-17-2018, 10:55 PM   #3
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I have seen this method suggested many times in books talking about Indian food, saying that this is the preferred method there. I can't imagine that, as it is wasteful, when you consider water and fuel; however, maybe what they do is cook some rice in the water, remove it with a fine skimmer, then add dal to the water, and cook that in the same water. This would actually save water and fuel.

I have only done this a couple of times, but usually just used the rice cooker. I got rid of the rice cooker when I got the IP, but I liked the idea of putting it in the rice cooker, and forgetting about it, while doing the rest of the meal! The pasta method didn't really result in a better rice. And it's best for rices such as basmati and parboiled - ones that don't stick, like jasmine (my favorite!), or the Japanese, as you mentioned.
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Old 12-17-2018, 11:12 PM   #4
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Saw an interesting segment on Cook's Country/ATK recently where the talked about cooking rice. There was a discussion that doubling recipes is an issue - 1 cup of rice and 1.5 cups of water does not translate to 3 cups of rice and 4.5 cups of water.

The upshot of it all is that the simplest way to go is the finger joint method. Put the measure of rice into a pot and add water above the level of the rice to the depth of one finger joint. This works for all quantities of rice and all sizes of pans.
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Old 12-17-2018, 11:32 PM   #5
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I always use that finger joint method, too, but I use my small finger - my hands are larger than most people's hands! Close to an inch, I think.
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Old 12-18-2018, 12:07 AM   #6
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I am the odd one, I read on the back of my rice package and follow directions , because all rice do not cook the same.

Have any one tried this method?
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Old 12-18-2018, 02:13 AM   #7
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CakePoet, that's how I do it! If it ain't broke, don't fix it. And I've never really had problems cooking rice per package directions.

JJ, I mentioned that "Sara Moulton method" for cooking rice in one of those previous threads. Someone before her might have come up with that method, but she's the TV chef I first saw doing it. I've tried it; it worked. But the "follow the package directions" always works for me, too, so I don't bother with Sara's way. I suppose it's great, though, if one is rice-cooking challenged.
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Old 12-18-2018, 02:33 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cooking Goddess View Post
CakePoet, that's how I do it! If it ain't broke, don't fix it. And I've never really had problems cooking rice per package directions.

JJ, I mentioned that "Sara Moulton method" for cooking rice in one of those previous threads. Someone before her might have come up with that method, but she's the TV chef I first saw doing it. I've tried it; it worked. But the "follow the package directions" always works for me, too, so I don't bother with Sara's way. I suppose it's great, though, if one is rice-cooking challenged.
The “follow the directions on the package” method is obviously great; IF you want to make the amount of rice listed on the package.

I think I’ll try the pasta method on some long grain rice, next time I want some. But I’m quite sure that it won’t work on short grain rice, so I’ll just have to stick with the first knuckle method!

Should I know who Sara Moulton is, btw?
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Old 12-18-2018, 04:58 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JustJoel View Post
The “follow the directions on the package” method is obviously great; IF you want to make the amount of rice listed on the package.
Leftover rice means a stir-fry is in the near future, unless there is leftovers from the meal that the rice was served with. Since most of the rice (plain) we cook is usually going to be topped with something, it never gets buttered.
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Old 12-18-2018, 08:30 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JustJoel View Post
The “follow the directions on the package” method is obviously great; IF you want to make the amount of rice listed on the package.

I think I’ll try the pasta method on some long grain rice, next time I want some. But I’m quite sure that it won’t work on short grain rice, so I’ll just have to stick with the first knuckle method!

Should I know who Sara Moulton is, btw?
If you can do math, you can scale the package directions to the amount you want to make. I always use the package directions, too. I make plain white rice in the microwave; it comes out perfectly and stays hot till I need it.

Sara Moulton is a pretty well-known chef and cooking show host. From Wikipedia:

Quote:
She was the on-air food editor for Good Morning America, a morning news-and-talk show broadcast on the ABC television network, from 1997 through 2012. She was the chef of the executive dining room at Gourmet for 20 years, a stint that ended only when the magazine ceased publication in 2009.

Between 1996 and 2005, she hosted Cooking Live (1997–2002), Cooking Live Primetime (1999) and Sara's Secrets (2002–2005) on the Food Network, becoming one of the original stars of that cable-and-satellite-television channel during its first decade. In all, Moulton's career in television and cooking spans nearly 40 years.

Moulton is the author of several cookbooks and videos including Sara Moulton Cooks at Home (2002), Sara's Secrets for Weeknight Meals (2005) and Sara Moulton's Everyday Family Dinners (2010).

In 1982 she co-founded the New York Women's Culinary Alliance.

Since 2008, Moulton has been the host of Sara's Weeknight Meals, a cooking show distributed by American Public Television. From August of 2012 through October of 2018, Moulton was the author of a weekly cooking column for the Associated Press. In October 2016, Moulton joined Christopher Kimball's "Milk Street Radio," a weekly show broadcast by National Public Radio, as a cohost.[4]
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