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Old 06-12-2018, 08:29 AM   #1
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Creamier Chickpeas

I made a cold soup with the following ingredients:
1 small red onion, roughly chopped
2 small Persian cucumbers, peeled and chopped
2 mini or 1/2 medium yellow or orange bell, seeds and ribs removed, roughly chopped
1/2 tsp salt
1 14.5 oz can lower-sodium garbanzo beans, drained and rinsed well
1 medium head of garlic, roasted
3 tbsp tahini
2 tbsp shiro (white) miso
1 to 2 tbsp fresh squeezed lemon juice, or to taste
Water, as needed, to thin the soup
1/2 cup good quality extra virgin olive oil

It is delicious, although an entire head of garlic, even roasted, is a bit much.

No matter how much I puréed the soup, the texture was rather grainy, which I’m guessing is from the canned chickpeas. That texture is what I don’t like about chickpeas, although that texture seems to be absent in, say, store-bought hummus. Instead of using canned, is there a method of cooking dried chickpeas so that when they’re puréed they lose that grainy texture and come out nice and creamy?

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Old 06-12-2018, 12:12 PM   #2
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Instead of using canned, is there a method of cooking dried chickpeas so that when they’re puréed they lose that grainy texture and come out nice and creamy?
Yes. I picked up this trick several years ago.

The tough skin on the chickpeas is what causes the grainy texture, and baking soda is the key to getting the skins to separate. After soaking the chickpeas overnight, rinse them well and put them in a pan with enough fresh water to cover by an inch or so. Stir in a teaspoon of baking soda and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to a simmer and skim off any scummy stuff that forms on the surface as they cook. In about 30-45 minutes they should be very tender. Because the skins separate the beans cook in about half the time they normally take.

I've also used this technique to make creamy smooth black bean dip as well.

From what I've read, you can accomplish the same thing using canned, well-rinsed chickpeas. Simply heat them in a pan with baking soda and enough water to cover. I haven't actually tried it with canned beans myself, but there are people who swear by it.
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Old 06-12-2018, 01:17 PM   #3
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Another option, although I never tried it , is making hummus out of chickpea flour. I did a quick google and saw some recipes doing it this way ( with flour). I've never tried it myself so I cant vouch for the end product. I happen to have some chickpea flour unhand, so I may give it a go this weekend.
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Old 06-12-2018, 01:33 PM   #4
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Yes. I picked up this trick several years ago.

The tough skin on the chickpeas is what causes the grainy texture, and baking soda is the key to getting the skins to separate. After soaking the chickpeas overnight, rinse them well and put them in a pan with enough fresh water to cover by an inch or so. Stir in a teaspoon of baking soda and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to a simmer and skim off any scummy stuff that forms on the surface as they cook. In about 30-45 minutes they should be very tender. Because the skins separate the beans cook in about half the time they normally take.

I've also used this technique to make creamy smooth black bean dip as well.

From what I've read, you can accomplish the same thing using canned, well-rinsed chickpeas. Simply heat them in a pan with baking soda and enough water to cover. I haven't actually tried it with canned beans myself, but there are people who swear by it.
How do you remove the skins after they separate from the beans?
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Old 06-12-2018, 03:46 PM   #5
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How do you remove the skins after they separate from the beans?
The skins just sort of separate and float to the top. All you have to do is skim off the foam and give the chickpeas a good rinse in a colander after they finish cooking.
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Old 06-12-2018, 05:37 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by larry_stewart View Post
Another option, although I never tried it , is making hummus out of chickpea flour. I did a quick google and saw some recipes doing it this way ( with flour). I've never tried it myself so I cant vouch for the end product. I happen to have some chickpea flour unhand, so I may give it a go this weekend.
I’ll keep that in mind when (and if) I make hummus. Right now I’m concentrated on cold soups, and I don’t think chickpea flour would work well.
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Old 06-12-2018, 05:43 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by Steve Kroll View Post
Yes. I picked up this trick several years ago.

The tough skin on the chickpeas is what causes the grainy texture, and baking soda is the key to getting the skins to separate. After soaking the chickpeas overnight, rinse them well and put them in a pan with enough fresh water to cover by an inch or so. Stir in a teaspoon of baking soda and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to a simmer and skim off any scummy stuff that forms on the surface as they cook. In about 30-45 minutes they should be very tender. Because the skins separate the beans cook in about half the time they normally take.

I've also used this technique to make creamy smooth black bean dip as well.

From what I've read, you can accomplish the same thing using canned, well-rinsed chickpeas. Simply heat them in a pan with baking soda and enough water to cover. I haven't actually tried it with canned beans myself, but there are people who swear by it.
This was such a surprising method to me, that I did a bit of research. The most “popular” method seems to be to soak overnight, drain, then return the chickpeas to the pot, sprinkle with baking soda and cook for three minutes before adding the water. Other sites recommend actually soaking the beans in water and baking soda before cooking them. It appears that as long as baking soda is involved, it hardly matters when it’s added! I’ll try your ,ethos first, I think. Thank you!
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Old 06-13-2018, 11:20 AM   #8
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The skins just sort of separate and float to the top. All you have to do is skim off the foam and give the chickpeas a good rinse in a colander after they finish cooking.
I do beans unsoaked in my Instant Pot. Do you think this will work the same if I just add some baking soda to the water and beans in the IP before cooking?
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Old 06-13-2018, 02:24 PM   #9
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I do beans unsoaked in my Instant Pot. Do you think this will work the same if I just add some baking soda to the water and beans in the IP before cooking?
I can't say for certain, as I don't have an Instant Pot, but my sense is that it should work the same. It's the alkalinity that seems to be the key, much the way dried corn is softened and hulled by soaking in limewater (aka nixtamalization).
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Old 06-14-2018, 09:12 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by Steve Kroll View Post
Yes. I picked up this trick several years ago.

The tough skin on the chickpeas is what causes the grainy texture, and baking soda is the key to getting the skins to separate. After soaking the chickpeas overnight, rinse them well and put them in a pan with enough fresh water to cover by an inch or so. Stir in a teaspoon of baking soda and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to a simmer and skim off any scummy stuff that forms on the surface as they cook. In about 30-45 minutes they should be very tender. Because the skins separate the beans cook in about half the time they normally take.

I've also used this technique to make creamy smooth black bean dip as well.

From what I've read, you can accomplish the same thing using canned, well-rinsed chickpeas. Simply heat them in a pan with baking soda and enough water to cover. I haven't actually tried it with canned beans myself, but there are people who swear by it.
This is what I do.
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