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Old 10-17-2006, 10:35 PM   #11
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Well I was born and raised in Athens, GA...decided I didn't want to be a bulldog and went up to Clemson, graduated last May, and now I'm in Brazil for graduate school (I came down here in part to be with my girlfriend and to get a masters in tropical botany...she, by the way, doesn't cook)!

There are a lot of interesting and unique dishes here, it seems like every day I'm trying something new.

Oh and I'll be the first to agree with you, Carolina (NC) is the real Carolina!
It's my father's alma mater and USC happens to be our greatest rival :)
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Old 10-17-2006, 10:45 PM   #12
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I hope you truly have a great time there. Good luck with graduate school and your masters, your girlfriend, and MOST of all, your cooking! (not necessarily in that order ) Please keep us informed of anything we MUST know about Brazilian cooking!!!!! I think those beans you used tonight are called cranberry beans here. Don't forget to make cornbread to go with them next time. Put some jalapenos and green chilies in the cornbread! And cranberry beans are also good with a dollop of sour cream on them.

Looking forward to some of your recipes!
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Old 10-21-2006, 06:30 AM   #13
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Pressure cookers are great for cooking dried beans. I use mine often. Mine has a pressure valve which is designed to hiss very quietly when it has the right pressure. I definately agree with the suggestion that oil should be added to prevent froth from clogging the valve. I have also read that the beans should be cooked prior to adding the flavourings and other ingredients as tomato or salt added prior to their being soft can cause them to be tough. Also, care is needed to boiled, drain and rinse kidney beans prior to cooking as this releases toxins from the beans.
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Old 10-21-2006, 06:48 AM   #14
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I thought they might be anasazi beans like I get in Denver--looks like a pinto horse but more white than red. But yours are red, I believe, like these in the link. I don't think I have seen similar here in our town.
http://sstradebrazil.trustpass.aliba..._/showimg.html
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Old 10-21-2006, 06:56 PM   #15
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clem - look on the bottom of your PC (pressure cooker) and you'll find the name (brand), probably a model number, too ... if you didn't keep the manual that came with it there is probably one on-line that you can download that will explain everything.

Beans are "done" in degrees ... some like the beans to just be "soft" with a watery liquid, some like the beans to be cooked to the degree that some begin to break down and thicken the liquid a little, some like the beans to cook down into a "mush". The final texture will depend on "how much" they are cooked.

Gretchen - I love anasazi beans! A little sweeter than pintos - I, too, got hooked on them when I lived in CO (Golden). But, I cooked them the "old fashioned" way in a pot on top of the stove ... long and slow.
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Old 10-21-2006, 07:28 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael in FtW
Beans are "done" in degrees ... some like the beans to just be "soft" with a watery liquid, some like the beans to be cooked to the degree that some begin to break down and thicken the liquid a little, some like the beans to cook down into a "mush". The final texture will depend on "how much" they are cooked.
Excellent point! I often combine different varieties of beans for that very reason. If you cook black beans and pinto beans which have been soaked for the same time, the black beans will become mushy and provide a rich and smooth black gravy while the pinto beans will woft yet maintain their shape and integrity.

I pressure cook the black bean and pinto bean combo for 45 to 55 minutes at 15 psi in the pressure cooker and then cool down using the slow method. (just shut off the heat and let the pot cool). This is enough time to break down the smoked hock or other meat ingredient.
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Old 11-15-2006, 01:13 AM   #17
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"Cooking Under Pressure" by Lorna Sass would be very useful. The first cookbook of her's I got was "Recipes From an Ecological Kitchen". It has been re-released under a different title. I am vegan, as is the second book I mentioned, so it is my personal favorite of hers. They are both full mof just about all the info you need to get the most from your cooker. So good in fact, that I bought a second cooker within a month of buying my first and her books. I have 8 quart Megafesa cookers. They are made in Spain. They are fabulous. My prior experience was with the old jigle tpo Presto. I was always sure I was going to blow myself up, so never really used it. Lorie
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Old 11-15-2006, 06:29 AM   #18
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I have also read that the beans should be cooked prior to adding the flavourings and other ingredients as tomato or salt added prior to their being soft can cause them to be tough.

To me the convenience/speed of using the PC for cooking beans means adding all the ingredients at one time and cooking it. Adding salt in the beginning means the salt will be a part of the bean, and not just sitting on the surface--and has no effect on the cooking. I also don't find that cooking with tomatoes makes much difference either. They are very much a part of my black bean soup, minestrone, and other bean soups--even when not cooking with the PC, I add it all together with no problem.

Also, care is needed to boiled, drain and rinse kidney beans prior to cooking as this releases toxins from the beans.

I do not understand this statement at all and don't think it is correct. I'd be long ago DEAD!!! ;o)
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Old 01-17-2007, 09:09 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by clemsontiger06
Well, all in all they came out pretty well. Flavoring the next pot will be my priority. Mmm, thinking about them flavored with bacon or smoked ham hock almost makes me hungry again :)

I say Brazilian beans, but here they are called "feij„o carioca," they're not black beans (feij„o preto). They resemble pinto beans but are not quite the same, instead of specks of dark brown, they have long transverse stripes, maybe they are a different variety of pinto beans, just not sure.

I really appreciate the help and tips! I am sure I'll have more questions in the future for you guys. Thanks :)

-Graham

Oi! Tudo Bem? Eu gosto de feijao preto muito

Eu uso alho, sal ,louro, bacon, & linguica calabresa. Muito delicioso!


Boa Sorte !

Petey
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