"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Pasta, Rice, Beans, Grains...
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 05-13-2014, 10:02 PM   #11
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 19,034
I have one of those tall storage jars for pasta. It is always full of homemade dried noodles. I have a very large clothing drying rack that folds up flat. Perfect for hanging and drying pasta. If I roll the dough out to a certain length and then hang it evenly over the rack, the noodles break at the fold and fit perfectly into the jar. I have it down to a science.

If I am going to be storing them, then I only use olive oil, flour and water. No eggs. But if I am going to using them for that meal that day, then I will add an egg.
__________________

__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-13-2014, 11:16 PM   #12
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 18,878
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
Quote:
Originally Posted by Addie View Post
I have one of those tall storage jars for pasta. It is always full of homemade dried noodles. I have a very large clothing drying rack that folds up flat. Perfect for hanging and drying pasta. If I roll the dough out to a certain length and then hang it evenly over the rack, the noodles break at the fold and fit perfectly into the jar. I have it down to a science.

If I am going to be storing them, then I only use olive oil, flour and water. No eggs. But if I am going to using them for that meal that day, then I will add an egg.
What's your trick to keep them from getting curly/wavy as they dry? I use a folding rack too. Have a look at the pix in this post, and see what I mean: Pasta drying problem
__________________

__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2014, 12:29 AM   #13
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 19,034
I don't have my strands as long as yours. Mine are less than one foot. They fit into those tall mason jar like containers and my strands of pasta fit into that. They do have a slight curve to them though. That is only natural for homemade. And when I am feeling lazy, I don't even hang them. I just make nests with each bunch that comes off the cutter.
__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2014, 01:30 AM   #14
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 18,878
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
Quote:
Originally Posted by Addie View Post
I don't have my strands as long as yours. Mine are less than one foot. They fit into those tall mason jar like containers and my strands of pasta fit into that. They do have a slight curve to them though. That is only natural for homemade. And when I am feeling lazy, I don't even hang them. I just make nests with each bunch that comes off the cutter.
Are there any tricks to making the nests so the strands don't stick to each other? Do you sprinkle them with flour?
__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2014, 01:59 AM   #15
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 19,034
Quote:
Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
Are there any tricks to making the nests so the strands don't stick to each other? Do you sprinkle them with flour?
I do. Then when they are dry, the flour just falls off. Place the nests on "impeccably clean" dishtowels, as Julia would say. The cloth silently helps to wick away the moisture and they dry faster.
__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2014, 09:35 AM   #16
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 18,878
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
Thanks Addie, I'll give the nests a try.
__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2014, 11:06 AM   #17
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 19,034
Quote:
Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
Thanks Addie, I'll give the nests a try.
Glad to be of help. Anytime.
__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2014, 03:53 PM   #18
Master Chef
 
CharlieD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: USA,Minnesota
Posts: 8,394
If I make some pasta and if I have some leftovers I simply put them in the fridge and try to use with in a week or less. I've never made so much that I would need to store it. Sorry no help here. But it just tastes better fresh. Dry one, to me tastes just like store bought. So I do not like to dry it.
__________________
You are what you eat.
CharlieD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-2015, 11:04 PM   #19
Assistant Cook
 
Cronker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Adelaide
Posts: 18
Pretty much what everyone has said above.
I sometimes freeze a ball of dough, about the size of a tennis ball is right for me, feeding two/four people.
I have a Mercato drying rack that sits on the counter for hanging noodles. Dry for about half hour after going through the machine, then into the fridge in a container till ready to cook.
I also have supermarket dried pasta in the cupboard for when I don't have time to make my own, but it's so simple that I hardly ever use bought dried pasta.
__________________
Cronker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2015, 01:48 AM   #20
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 19,034
I bought my attachment for pasta making for my KA when it was $24.99. I have been using it for years. The same goes for my meat grinder.

As the pasta is coming off the cutter, grab it all and let it fall as the piece of pasta comes to an end. Grab the other end and wrap it around your hand. Voila, you have your nest. I don't make my solid sheet of dough too long. Once you get it started, if it is too long, then you still need two hands to feed it into the cutters and cannot divert your attention to when it is coming off the cutters. I also have something at the beginning such as a large box like saltines standing on end, sitting there so I can rest the dough on that as it is going into and through the feeder. I cover the box with one of my pastry towels and generously flour it. The sheet of dough is now higher than the feeding part and can fall into the feeder without any assistance. A lot of times in you leave the dough hanging to feed itself through the cutters, it will break off in the middle. And you are left holding some very short strands of pasta.

One of the benefits of having a manual pasta cutter vs. one for your KA, is that you can go at your own pace when cutting it. I am fortunate in that I have the counter space to do all this. But I still have to work with the speed of the KA even though it is on as low as it can go.

And I have to agree with Charlie. Fresh dough is so much better than letting it dry to be used later. But sometimes we all get carried away in our enthusiasm.
__________________

__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
homemade, other, pasta

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:04 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.