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Old 09-23-2014, 06:40 AM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PrincessFiona60 View Post
Partial to Barilla, have not seen Colavita aside from the olive oil.
I am also partial to Barilla pasta. Equally good are: De Cecco, DiVella.
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Old 09-23-2014, 07:16 AM   #22
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I must be really low maintenance when it comes to pasta. I buy most of mine at Trader Joe's. I really like their organic whole wheat spaghetti I never really cared for whole wheat spaghetti until I tried this. I buy their regular penne, and other shapes too. I usually buy in bulk since I have containers in the pantry.

If my store is having a BOGO on pasta I will buy the Ronzoni there, usually comes out to less than a dollar a pound.
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Old 09-23-2014, 07:19 AM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zfranca View Post
I am also partial to Barilla pasta. Equally good are: De Cecco, DiVella.
There is only one instance in which I MUST use De Cecco. Here is why:
Lasagna rolls with prosciutto and zucchini
A different way to prepare the classic lasagne

Ingredients:
6 Lasagna strip De Cecco
2 lbs Small zucchini
2 TBSP Chopped parsley
¼ cup Olive oil
1 Clove of garlic (pressed)
1 tsp salt
6 Slices of prosciutto or ham.
1 cup Prepared béchamel sauce (page..)
8 oz Provolone cheese or buffalo mozzarella (shredded)
2 TBSP Grated parmesan cheese
Oil and salt for boiling lasagne
Directions:
1. Bring a large pot of water to boil, add salt and 1 TBS of oil. Cook lasagna strips for 6 minutes, Remove and spread on a towel to cool. Once cooked, the lasagna strips will measure 10x51/2 inch. You may use a different brand or make your own pasta. However the quantities listed are for this size of pasta. If your lasagna strips are smaller or larger, please adjust the quantities accordingly.
2. Dice zucchini finely (brunoise). If you are using large zucchini, discard the central white part. You should obtain 4 cups.
3. In a very large sauté pan heat oil with chopped parsley and press garlic directly into the pan. Add diced zucchini and salt to your taste and bring heat to high, stirring frequently. Cook for 7 minutes. Remove from heat and allow to cool. If you do not have a large frying pan, cook the zucchini in two butches. We want the zucchini to maintain a crisp and not mushy consistency.
4. Spread 2 TBSP of béchamel sauce over each lasagna strip (reserve remain for final assembly), then a slice of prosciutto, ½ cup of cooked zucchini, and shredded cheese..
5. Roll it in jelly roll fashion, wrap it in aluminum foil and freeze for about ½ hour to stiffen. If you plan this recipe for later use, just keep the rolls frozen.
6. If you are using pre-frozen rolls, take them out of the freezer several hours before your dinner preparation, so you can easily cut them crosswise into four pieces.
7. Preheat oven to 450 ° F.
Using the remaining béchamel: lightly cover the bottom of a baking dish of your choice suitable for serving at the table. Arrange lasagna rolls into it, spread remaining béchamel sauce and parmesan cheese over the top. Bake until golden brown on top (about 20 minutes). If you have a broiler you might broil for a few minutes.
SERVES 6.
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Old 09-23-2014, 08:58 AM   #24
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I honestly prefer pasta by original italian brands: "Latini" produces my favourites, or "Cipriani" and "Martelli"! It's hard and expensive to get them especially in a foreign country - but the fantastic pasta it's worth your while...
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Old 09-23-2014, 09:50 AM   #25
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Nicely done Z!
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Old 09-23-2014, 10:37 AM   #26
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I miss pasta, it's a rare holiday treat these days.

I used to buy Anna Pasta from Cento for everyday, it's always a loss leader at my little 1950's supermarket.

I used Dreamfields until I read that the lo carb angle was a myth. I notice they have changed the packaging and removed the information on net carbs from the package.

I like Barilla because it holds up well for reheating and is not mushy on day two.

For a special treat I like Delverde. I only buy Delverde at the local Italian specialty store, the boxes in most of the grocery stores are covered with dust!
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Old 09-23-2014, 05:57 PM   #27
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I'm one of those who doesn't find much difference in dried pastas.
I can taste the difference between fresh and dried but as far as dried goes I get whatever is cheapest, on sale, or I find a coupon to lower the price.
Usually store brand but had $off deals on 2 name brands recently. Barilla Plus and San Giorgio for $.89 a pound. Couldn't really tell a difference over the store brand.
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Old 09-23-2014, 06:11 PM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zagut View Post
I'm one of those who doesn't find much difference in dried pastas.
I can taste the difference between fresh and dried but as far as dried goes I get whatever is cheapest, on sale, or I find a coupon to lower the price.
Usually store brand but had $off deals on 2 name brands recently. Barilla Plus and San Giorgio for $.89 a pound. Couldn't really tell a difference over the store brand.
Good, I'm not the only one
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Old 09-23-2014, 06:14 PM   #29
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Favourite brand of Italian style pasta?

Quote:
Originally Posted by bakechef View Post
Good, I'm not the only one

No, you're not! I can't tell much difference either.
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Old 09-23-2014, 06:21 PM   #30
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Guess those of us with no taste must unite.
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