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Old 05-03-2006, 01:37 PM   #31
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Ummm, there are a lot of frozen uncooked lasagnas in the freezer section. It is FINE to freeze uncooked lasagna. Don't half cook it.
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Old 05-03-2006, 01:47 PM   #32
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Ummm, there are a lot of frozen uncooked lasagnas in the freezer section. It is FINE to freeze uncooked lasagna. Don't half cook it.
I believe the frozen lasagna in the freezer section of the market may already be pre-cooked, frozen and packaged by pros --prepared in a certain way for marketing/freezing/shelf-life/cooking. Probably lots of preservatives added as well. Just my personal preference not to opt for uncooked or half cooked noodles in the freezer. That's the beauty of this forum. We can all give our opinions/likes & dislikes. BTW, Stouffer's is pretty good.
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Old 05-03-2006, 01:54 PM   #33
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Supermarket freezer section lasagnas are ALL precooked. Where did you get your info that any brands are uncooked, Gretchen?

That said, I still don't see where there's any advantage whatsoever to freezing lasagna uncooked. You have to cook it eventually, don't you?? And quite frankly I'd feel much safer freezing a completely cooked product than I would an uncooked one. Especially, as someone else pointed out, one was using eggs as a binder in one of the layers. Not to mention you have to freeze it whole. You can't freeze it uncooked in portions - a major drawback as far as I'm concerned.

I really do not understand the advantage at all. Just bake the darn thing, portion it out, wrap well, & freeze it. What's the problem with that? I mean, really, how long does it take to bake lasagna? An hour tops?
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Old 05-03-2006, 01:57 PM   #34
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I really do not understand the advantage at all. Just bake the darn thing, portion it out, wrap well, & freeze it. What's the problem with that? I mean, really, how long does it take to bake lasagna? An hour tops?
BreezyCooking, everyone has their own way of doing things. Just because someone does not do it your way does not mean it is not worth doing.
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Old 05-03-2006, 02:04 PM   #35
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I have to agree everybody has their own way, it's just that my way is the right one and everybody who doesn't agree with it are simply wrong.
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Old 05-03-2006, 02:05 PM   #36
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Mish, what did you mean by fresh pasta? Like the freshly home made pasta?
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Old 05-03-2006, 02:15 PM   #37
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Mish, what did you mean by fresh pasta? Like the freshly home made pasta?
Don't know how to post double quotes. I like the way you think, Charlie. What I call using my noodle

I started a topic about fresh store-bought pasta sheets to get some input, since I've seen it mentioned in many recipes. Sorry I deleted it, but thought it should have a different discussion/topic.
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Old 05-03-2006, 02:39 PM   #38
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Well, not sure what you are talking about but you can pretty much use anything in lasagna, even spaghety if that is all you have.
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Old 05-03-2006, 02:54 PM   #39
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CharlieD - actually no, you can't just use "spaghetti" to make Lasagna.

The reason it's called "Lasagna" is because it uses "Lasagna" noodles. Just like a recipe calling for Farfalle uses Farfalle pasta; just like a recipe calling for Penne uses Penne pasta.

A baked pasta dish using "spaghetti" would be just that - a baked pasta dish using spaghetti. It wouldn't be "Lasagna".
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Old 05-03-2006, 02:57 PM   #40
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BreezyCooking, You are just way too serious. Your handle doesn't suite you.
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