"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Pasta, Rice, Beans, Grains...
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 02-20-2017, 11:29 AM   #21
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Hæȝelshām, Sūþseaxna Rīce
Posts: 154
Basic cooking in my school was horrendously basic and rather boring. "Design a sandwich", "design a soup for an athlete and then do pages of write-up and graphs to discuss its crunchiness, sweetness etc."

Yea I didn't get on with that.
__________________

Suthseaxa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2017, 07:58 AM   #22
Master Chef
 
Mad Cook's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: North West England
Posts: 5,098
Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigC View Post
Is what you read stating that cooking in boiling water destroys the toxin? I can't imagine that if they are cooked in water that the toxin wouldn't still be present in the cooking liquid, unless it was drained off and the legumes were rinsed.
Most books and recipes recommend that you boil fast for the first 10 minutes of cooking to remove the toxins then simmer until cooked. When they are cooked chuck out the cooking liquid and use the beans for whatever you are planning.

It refers to members of the Kidney bean family but not to chick peas (aka garbanzos)

Having said that I always throw away the liquid from canned chickpeas. No reason really - it's just gloopy and horrid looking.
__________________

__________________
Don’t look for the light at the end of the tunnel. Stomp along and switch the bl**dy thing on yourself.
Mad Cook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-02-2018, 01:01 PM   #23
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 3,391
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mad Cook View Post
Having said that I always throw away the liquid from canned chickpeas. No reason really - it's just gloopy and horrid looking.

I saw a recipe on DC, for a vegan or eggless mayo that looked promising, in the past couple months. It used 1/4 cup of the liquid of canned chickpeas as an emulsifier. It had a name, but that escapes me at the moment. It looked really interesting.
blissful is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-02-2018, 02:41 PM   #24
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 21,355
Quote:
Originally Posted by blissful View Post
I saw a recipe on DC, for a vegan or eggless mayo that looked promising, in the past couple months. It used 1/4 cup of the liquid of canned chickpeas as an emulsifier. It had a name, but that escapes me at the moment. It looked really interesting.
Aquafaba. Apparently it acts like an egg white and can be made into mayonnaise or something like whipped eggs for baking.

https://www.americastestkitchen.com/...at-is-aquafaba
__________________
Anyplace where people argue about food is a good place.
~ Anthony Bourdain, Parts Unknown, 2018
GotGarlic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-03-2018, 08:25 PM   #25
Master Chef
 
Mad Cook's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: North West England
Posts: 5,098
Quote:
Originally Posted by blissful View Post
Hey GG, yeah, the package (Bob's Red Mill) doesn't specify if the flour is made from raw or cooked garbanzo beans. I wrote them asking that particular question. I'm sure they'll get right back to me. (as they are a good company from all I hear)

Did you ever notice people making falafels use cooked beans, or sometimes just soaked beans, then the falafels are fried for a fairly short time. This leaves me believing that there isn't a risk in using uncooked garbanzo beans. This is the opposite (almost) of there being a toxic risk.

I still feel like 'I don't know."
The Palestinian man who keeps a lovely little café near me and who gave me his mother's recipe for falafels (which he uses in the café), told me that falafels are properly made from uncooked (but soaked) chick peas (Garbanzos). He was most insistence that you can't make falafels with cooked or canned chick peas - but if you prefer to do so - Well, "chaq'un a son gout".
__________________
Don’t look for the light at the end of the tunnel. Stomp along and switch the bl**dy thing on yourself.
Mad Cook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2018, 08:19 AM   #26
Executive Chef
 
dragnlaw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Montreal
Posts: 2,919
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mad Cook View Post
.
Never heard anything about them being poisonous unlike red kidney beans & their relatives
This is what I have also heard.

But sometimes the food world is a little slow in advising about toxins. This was the first year I had EVER seen a warning at the grocers about being sure to boil Fiddleheads for 15 minutes prior to eating.
__________________
Meddle not in the affairs of dragons for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.
dragnlaw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2018, 10:31 AM   #27
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Calosso, Piemonte
Posts: 729
Farinata - Socca - Chickpea 'pancakes'

This is a very simple dish, but extremely more-ish! Along the Cote d' Azure, it's called 'Soca' (Nice). In the Italian Riviera, it's Farinata. Everywhere along the coast, up to Genova, around 4.00pm people queue at the baker's to take some home.

This recipe is one that was sent to me by a fellow foodie, some time ago:

1/2 kg chickpea flour.
1 sachet of beer yeast
1 1/2 L. water
10g salt
1 tsp EVOO
di reston is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2018, 10:59 AM   #28
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Calosso, Piemonte
Posts: 729
Sorry folks, my age-ole computer's started to play games again!

Here is the rest of the recipe:

Mix all the ingredients, making sure there aren't any lumps.
Having done that, leave for 4 - 5 hours. The batter should be smooth and velvety. The thickness, once cooked, should be around 10ml

Heat your pan, bringing up the temperature to round about 225°max, and cook until you have a good golden colour.. You can check as much as you like, and when you're happy that it's all ok, remove it from the oven, sprinkle a bit more salt. You can also scatter a sprinkling of rosemary if that appeals to you. Here, it really is a favourite.

This street is typical of where I live, right down to the Riviera, and there are always crowds waiting!

di reston


Enough is never as good as a feast Oscar Wilde
di reston is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2018, 08:46 AM   #29
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Calosso, Piemonte
Posts: 729
We very often use 'L.' to indicate litre. Bad habit. Another thing: we use special pans for this. They are heavy copper bottom and heavy steel on the top. The rim is stainless steel, of about 50ml .They need seasoning, i.e. before first use, pour a thin layer of EVOO, and put in the oven for 1hr on a medium heat, then, leaving the oil in, let the pan go cold. Then wipe it to clean it, I use paper towel, but don't put it in the dishwasher what ever you do. To clean it, use olive oil and paper towel. Store with a piece of tin foil, or grease-proof paper. But DON'T put it in the sink or the dishwasher or any detergent! A pancake pan would be ideal, because I'm fairly sure that there aren't any pans like the one described above.

I'm sure you all know how to season a pan - so forgive me if I'm bringing coal to Newcastle!

di reston


Enough is never as good as a feast Oscar Wilde
__________________

di reston is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
flour, other

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:30 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.