"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Pasta, Rice, Beans, Grains...
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 12-15-2005, 06:22 PM   #1
Senior Cook
 
MochaBean04's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Buffalo, NewYork
Posts: 204
Send a message via AIM to MochaBean04
Graham flour?

i have a recipe that needs graham flour and i have never heard of it. .lol and i have never even seen it in stores. what is it exactly? lol thanks a bunch!

__________________

__________________





Sometimes, the solution to all life's problems is a good dessert.

MochaBean04 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-15-2005, 06:37 PM   #2
DC Grandma
 
Dove's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: USA,California
Posts: 3,217
Graham flour

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.


Jump to: navigation, search
Graham flour is a type of whole wheat flour. Rather than simply grinding the whole grain (bran, germ, and endosperm) wheat kernel, the components are ground separately. The endosperm is ground finely, initially creating white flour. The bran and germ are ground coarsely. The two parts are then mixed back together, creating a coarse-textured flour that bakes well. Graham flour is used to make graham crackers and pie crusts, among other things.
Graham flour is generally not available outside of the United States. A fully correct substitute would be to mix the appropriate amounts of white flour, wheat bran, and wheat germ. Plain whole wheat flour can also be used as a substitute, but the texture would be different from graham flour.
[edit]
__________________

__________________
May I always be the person my dog thinks I am.

Walk towards the Sunshine and the Shadows will fall behind you!
Dove is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-15-2005, 07:12 PM   #3
Master Chef
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston
Posts: 9,269
You can buy it online from King Arthur Flour
__________________
jennyema is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-15-2005, 07:43 PM   #4
Senior Cook
 
MochaBean04's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Buffalo, NewYork
Posts: 204
Send a message via AIM to MochaBean04
thanks. . i only need a cup of this stuff. . .how much can i substiture everything for?
__________________





Sometimes, the solution to all life's problems is a good dessert.

MochaBean04 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-15-2005, 11:56 PM   #5
Master Chef
 
Michael in FtW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 6,592
Dove gave a good reference (especially if you read all the imbedded links) - here is another one on the origin of Graham Flour and the man it was named after.

Don't know how old your recipe is, where it came from, what it is for, or why it calls for Graham Flour. Only two reasons to use it that I know of are nutritional value (whole grain vs white flour) and/or texture.

For nutritional value - use the same amount of whole wheat flour. Stone Ground whole wheat will have a little better nutritional value and a little more texture.

If the reason for Graham flour is for texture use 7/8 whole flour and 1/8 wheat germ. For 1 Cup Graham Flour - this would break down to something like this (using US measurements):

7/8 Cup (14 Tablespoons) Whole Wheat Flour PLUS
1/8 Cup (2 Tablespoons) Wheat Germ

another way to write that would be:

1 Cup minus 2 Tablespoons Whole Wheat Flour PLUS 2 Tablespoons Wheat Germ.

If your grocery store doesn't carry Graham Flour you can probably find it in small quantities (probably 1 pound box/bag) at a health food store. Some health food stores sell from bulk containers so you can just scoop out the amount you need.
__________________
"It ain't what you don't know that gets you in trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." - Mark Twain
Michael in FtW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-16-2005, 02:20 AM   #6
Executive Chef
 
Piccolina's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 4,319
Send a message via AIM to Piccolina Send a message via MSN to Piccolina Send a message via Yahoo to Piccolina
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dove
Graham flour

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.


Jump to: navigation, search
Graham flour is a type of whole wheat flour. Rather than simply grinding the whole grain (bran, germ, and endosperm) wheat kernel, the components are ground separately. The endosperm is ground finely, initially creating white flour. The bran and germ are ground coarsely. The two parts are then mixed back together, creating a coarse-textured flour that bakes well. Graham flour is used to make graham crackers and pie crusts, among other things.
Graham flour is generally not available outside of the United States. A fully correct substitute would be to mix the appropriate amounts of white flour, wheat bran, and wheat germ. Plain whole wheat flour can also be used as a substitute, but the texture would be different from graham flour.
[edit]
Not to be confused with gram/garam flour (aka, besan) which is flour that is made from dried chickpeas, and is actually gluten-free (It's really good!)
__________________
Jessica

"The most indispensable ingredient of all good home cooking: love, for those you are cooking for" ~ Sophia Loren
Piccolina is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-16-2005, 02:32 AM   #7
Master Chef
 
Michael in FtW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 6,592
Absolutely right, Piccolina! Graham (a wheat flour) should not be confused with gram/garam (chickpea) flour!!!
__________________
"It ain't what you don't know that gets you in trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." - Mark Twain
Michael in FtW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-16-2005, 11:48 AM   #8
Master Chef
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston
Posts: 9,269
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael in FtW
Absolutely right, Piccolina! Graham (a wheat flour) should not be confused with gram/garam (chickpea) flour!!!
Those cookies would be interesting!
__________________
jennyema is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-19-2005, 12:05 AM   #9
Senior Cook
 
MochaBean04's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Buffalo, NewYork
Posts: 204
Send a message via AIM to MochaBean04
this is the recipe that i am makin . . .its called reindeer ravioli. . lol



Filling:
5 graham crackers, broken into pieces
6 ounces milk or dark chocolate, or a combination, chopped
3 ounces cream cheese, at room temperature

Dough:
10 tablespoons unsalted butter, at room temperature
1/2 cup dark brown sugar
1/2 cup granulated sugar
2 tablespoons molasses
1 tablespoon pure vanilla extract
11/2 cups all-purpose flour
1 cup graham flour
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon fine salt
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 cup heavy cream
Nonstick spray

Instructions
For the filling: Pulse the graham crackers in a food processor until crumbly. Add the chocolate and cream cheese and continue to pulse until crumbly and pasty.

Using the filling portion ('the bumpy side') of a 12-section ravioli mold, cover the indented side with plastic wrap. Pack some of the filling into each indentation, leveling each one so it's flush with the top of the mold. Remove and place on a plate. Repeat to make 24 fillings. Cover the filling with plastic wrap and refrigerate. (Eat the crumbs left behind.)

To make the dough: Combine the butter and sugars in a large mixing bowl. Beat at medium speed, until fluffy and combined, about 2 minutes. Add the molasses and vanilla and beat until combined.

In a separate bowl, whisk both flours, the baking soda, salt and cinnamon together. Add flour mixture to butter mixture in 3 parts, alternating with cream in 2 parts, beginning and ending with flour. Be careful not to overwork the dough. Divide into 2 disks, wrap in plastic wrap and chill until very firm, about 1 hour.

Lay out an 11 by 15-inch piece of foil on a clean workspace and sprinkle generously with flour. Place a disk of dough on top and cover with a large sheet of plastic wrap. Roll the dough between the 2 layers (Voila, no messy hands) until you have a rectangle measuring 10 by 13 inches, cutting and patching as needed. Repeat with the other disk of dough. Transfer each foil to a cookie sheet and refrigerate for 30 minutes to 1 hour.

When chilled, remove plastic wrap from 1 flat of chilled and rolled dough. Spray the zigzag side of the ravioli mold with nonstick spray and sprinkle it with flour. Place the mold, zigzag side down, onto the lower half of the dough, making a slight indent in the dough. Take the chocolate filling from the refrigerator. Place a round of filling on the center of each square ravioli impression.

Using the foil to lift the top of the dough, fold it over the mounds on the bottom half leaving plenty of give to tuck dough between each mound. Gently press out the air around the mounds with wet fingers to keep the dough from cracking. Spray the zigzag side of the mold again and sprinkle the top of the ravioli with flour. Invert the press on the cookies, making another impression in the dough, and press very firmly to seal the 2 layers together and cut off excess dough.

To remove the mold, gently lift by pressing downward on the 2 mounds on the end. Lift up on the mold working your way across the dough slab. Use a dry pastry brush to brush off excess flour. Cut ravioli into individual portions, trimming away excess dough with a knife or fluted pastry cutter. Arrange on a baking sheet. Chill the molded ravioli in the refrigerator until firm to the touch, 30 more minutes.

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.

Bake the ravioli for 25 to 30 minutes. Remove from oven and let sit on cookie sheet 5 more minutes, using a pastry cutter to cut in between the ravioli while warm, if desired. Then slide the slab onto a cookie sheet to cool. Eat one and freeze the other to keep it really fresh. Yummmmm!!!!
__________________





Sometimes, the solution to all life's problems is a good dessert.

MochaBean04 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-19-2005, 01:30 AM   #10
Master Chef
 
Michael in FtW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 6,592
Okay - you're making the S'More Rockin' Reindeer Ravioli recipe - an original recipe by Laura Stanke, adapted by Food Network Kitchens and featured on the Winning Holiday Cookies episode.

Just for grins - you might find the tips from the creator of some interest - just click the link and scroll down until you find them.

As for finding graham flour, Amber from Auburn, WA (the first post at the above link) had a good suggestion, "Oh, and if the grahm flour is not in the usual place for flour, look in the health food section of your grocery store." Another option to find graham flour would be to let your fingers do the walking - break out your phone book and call around to grocery stores in your area that you might not frequent, and the health food stores in your area, and see if they carry it.

Milled whole wheat flour is finer ground than stone ground, which is finer than graham flour. This would would equate (regarding the texture) to something like corn flour (milled whole wheat) vs fine corn meal (stone ground whole wheat) vs course corn meal (graham flour). You'll get essentially the same flavor no matter which you use - there will just be a little difference in the texture.

If you can't find graham flour I wouldn't hesitate to make this with plain old whole wheat flour.
__________________

__________________
"It ain't what you don't know that gets you in trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." - Mark Twain
Michael in FtW is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:06 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.