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Old 09-03-2006, 02:36 PM   #1
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How do you make your Jambalaya?

How do you make your Jambalaya?

I dont just want a recipe, I have tons of recipe sites I use, but rather would like some input from people who actually make it on a somewhat regular basis. Im more interested in the ingredients you use, ingredients you exclude, thickening agents, simmering times, rice grains, and any other tip that can give me ideas to customize a recipe. Thanks!

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Old 09-03-2006, 03:06 PM   #2
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I user the older version of this recipe. The difference is that the newer version uses his MAGIC spice mixes and the older version lists the individual herbs and spices.

I serve it with creole sauce as a topping.
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Old 09-03-2006, 05:03 PM   #3
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I guess the one big difference that I use in my jambalaya which makes it taste different from others would be chorizo (cured, not the al fresco) instead of andouille. From there, depends on if I want to make it with crab, crawfish, shrimp, etc. I try not to alter it too much because then it won't taste like jambalaya anymore.
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Old 09-03-2006, 05:04 PM   #4
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found this little bit of info...




According to John Folse, the word Jambalaya comes from "Jambon a la ya-ya", Jambon being French for pork and Ya-ya from an African word for rice. Jambalaya is derived from the Spanish dish paella. There are two basic styles of jambalaya, Cajun and Creole. I would like to discuss the difference between them. If you travel the Louisiana countryside, you are not likely to find tomatoes, bell pepper, or celery in the jambalaya. The Cajuns call this brown jambalaya. Cajun jambalaya is generally made with chicken or pork with sausage and onions. In New Orleans, jambalaya almost always contains seafood, onion, bell pepper, celery (known as "The Trinity") and tomatoes. This is known as Creole, or red, jambalaya. Creole jambalaya often has shrimp or crawfish instead of chicken. The debate over whether red or brown jambalaya is "real" jambalaya rages on. I generally prefer the Cajun style, but am perfectly happy with either one.

David Jacobs, of Louisiana Sausagemaker
http://www.nolafoodie.com/id80.html
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Old 09-03-2006, 05:07 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Seven S



According to John Folse, the word Jambalaya comes from "Jambon a la ya-ya", Jambon being French for pork and Ya-ya from an African word for rice. Jambalaya is derived from the Spanish dish paella. There are two basic styles of jambalaya, Cajun and Creole. I would like to discuss the difference between them. If you travel the Louisiana countryside, you are not likely to find tomatoes, bell pepper, or celery in the jambalaya. The Cajuns call this brown jambalaya. Cajun jambalaya is generally made with chicken or pork with sausage and onions. In New Orleans, jambalaya almost always contains seafood, onion, bell pepper, celery (known as "The Trinity") and tomatoes. This is known as Creole, or red, jambalaya. Creole jambalaya often has shrimp or crawfish instead of chicken. The debate over whether red or brown jambalaya is "real" jambalaya rages on. I generally prefer the Cajun style, but am perfectly happy with either one.

David Jacobs, of Louisiana Sausagemaker
http://www.nolafoodie.com/id80.html
Interesting. I guess I prefer the creole style then.
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Old 09-03-2006, 05:12 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ironchef
I guess the one big difference that I use in my jambalaya which makes it taste different from others would be chorizo (cured, not the al fresco) instead of andouille. From there, depends on if I want to make it with crab, crawfish, shrimp, etc. I try not to alter it too much because then it won't taste like jambalaya anymore.
do you use converted (parboiled) or regular long-grain rice? have you tried using them both, not at the same time, but i mean, have you gathered results and chosen one over the other? i tend to be a traditionalist when it comes to recipes and my guess is regular long-grain is traditional, but since i am no expert with jambalaya, i certainly expect this to be trickier than using converted.... i can make a kickass paella with real valencia rice, a mean risotto w carnaroli, vialone nano or arborio, biryani rice dishes with basmati, and the best arroz con pollo with regular long-grain, but when it comes to converted rice (which i am not particular too fond of in taste) i am clueless, and although i know it is a foolproof rice, i wonder how it would taste like in this heavily seasoned dish....
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Old 09-03-2006, 05:21 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Seven S
do you use converted (parboiled) or regular long-grain rice? have you tried using them both, not at the same time, but i mean, have you gathered results and chosen one over the other? i tend to be a traditionalist when it comes to recipes and my guess is regular long-grain is traditional, but since i am no expert with jambalaya, i certainly expect this to be trickier than using converted.... i can make a kickass paella with real valencia rice, a mean risotto w carnaroli, vialone nano or arborio, biryani rice dishes with basmati, and the best arroz con pollo with regular long-grain, but when it comes to converted rice (which i am not particular too fond of in taste) i am clueless, and although i know it is a foolproof rice, i wonder how it would taste like in this heavily seasoned dish....
No, I try to use regular long grain but I've also used medium grain rice when that's what was available. With medium grain rice, I find that I get a thicker jambalaya, but that's to be expected because of the normally higher amounts of amylopectic starches. I won't use Uncle Ben's unless I'm in dire need for rice and even then I'd be hesitant, so I'm not sure as to how it would taste.
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Old 09-03-2006, 09:31 PM   #8
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The first time I made jambalaya with converted rice, I was disappointed and switched to uncooked long grain. That's worked for me since.
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Old 09-03-2006, 10:55 PM   #9
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well, i went ahead and made it with regular long-grain... initially i had severely way too much liquid but after cooking the rice for 20 minutes realized that the grains were almost done even though the rice was still submerged so i went ahead and used a ladle to take the excess liquid off and covered it for 10 more minutes.... i was quite pleased with the results and the taste was superb
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