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Old 12-26-2009, 09:51 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by Selkie View Post
Unless your stove top is busy with a lot of other dishes cooking, you most likely don't need a rice streamer.

All you need are:

A pot with a lid
Wooden Spoon
Measuring cup
Rice
Water

In general, 1 cup of dried rice will turn into 2 cups of cooked rice.
Measure your rice and pour it into the pot.
Measure your water at 1-1/2 times the amount of rice you just put into the pot. (e.g. 1 cup of rice + 1-1/2 cups of water). Give the rice a swirl or two with the spoon. Leave the lid off.
Turn your burner on high and watch for it to come to a rolling boil. (not just little bubbles around the edges.)
Put the lid on and don't peek or take it off until the rice is completely ready.
When it comes to the rolling boil and you put on the lid, turn the burner down to medium low for 6 minutes. After the 6 minutes, turn the burner down to its lowest setting for another 6 minutes. After the second 6 minutes is up, turn the burner off and just let the pot set (the rice is still steaming) for 8 minutes.

Your rice is now ready. And it always works for Japanese-style rice.
I like this answer : ). I had problems with Rice until my brother from California told me how to do it and this was basically what he told me. the only difference was once it comes to a boil, put cover on and set it at the lowest settings for a good 20-35 minutes. definetely DO NOT take the cover off.
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Old 01-13-2010, 09:08 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by Ghuraba View Post
Hello...I have just accepted the fact that I can't cook and it is not something that comes natural to me.

I just made rice and its horrible...as usual...the rice got all stuck to the pot...the rice is mushy...there is no taste to it even though I put salt...and then I put more and its the same...I'm just no good with cooking at all...

Any advice?
There are different kinds of rice. There are ones that get seperate, light and fluffy when cooked like long grain rice, others get cling together like medium grain rice and the short grain rice get soft and cling together. The best kinds I like to use are long grain rice and Basamati. The best way to cook them is with accurate measurements. Soak 1 cup of rice in water for about 15 minutes and then drain. Boil 1 1/2 cup of water, then add the soaked rice to the boiling water. Then let it cook in very low heat for about 15-20 minutes.
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Old 01-15-2010, 02:05 AM   #23
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I don't mess with cooking rice on the stove... never have. We just never did it that way in my family. In fact, I didn't really know until a few years ago that people cooked rice on a stove. My mom always used a rice cooker, and I did too, until I learned how to do it in the mike. Never got the hang of doing it on the stove.
Trying it either of these ways should definitely end your rice woes.
For a rice cooker, simply measure out (we'll say 4 for a generous serving) of those little plastic rice cups into your rice cooker. Then fill the cooker up to the 4 line inside the pot. Add salt. Press the button. When it pops up, you're done.
To make it in the microwave is simple too. This recipe will make enough for about 4 people. Measure out 2 of those little plastic rice cups to 2 cups of water in a ceramic bowl. Add salt; stir. Set the timer for 20 minutes. I usually let it run for the whole 20 minutes before stirring. Sometimes, it's finished then, and sometimes you have to add 5 minutes to it (stir again). Simple, right? Hope this helps. :)
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Old 01-15-2010, 08:34 AM   #24
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To make it in the microwave is simple too. This recipe will make enough for about 4 people. Measure out 2 of those little plastic rice cups to 2 cups of water in a ceramic bowl. Add salt; stir. Set the timer for 20 minutes. I usually let it run for the whole 20 minutes before stirring. Sometimes, it's finished then, and sometimes you have to add 5 minutes to it (stir again). Simple, right? Hope this helps. :)
You cook rice in the MW for 20 minutes?
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Old 01-15-2010, 11:14 AM   #25
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...Add salt.
You add salt? In a quote from the sci-fi spoof, Galaxy Quest, "Oh, that's just wrong!"
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Old 01-15-2010, 08:02 PM   #26
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Different strokes for different folks, my friends. Why wouldn't you add salt? This is rice for beans and rice, or stews, not some pilaf. I am from New Orleans originally... my rice cooking roots are cajun. Maybe I just do it differently. Also, I've never had any complaints.

Also, please tell me how long you would cook rice in the MW, vagriller. I'm always interested in learning a new technique.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Selkie View Post
You add salt? In a quote from the sci-fi spoof, Galaxy Quest, "Oh, that's just wrong!"
Quote:
Originally Posted by vagriller
You cook rice in the MW for 20 minutes?
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Old 01-15-2010, 10:28 PM   #27
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I'm a Cajun also... so welcome to DC! English was a second language to my grandmother and my mother. Navarre and Savoy are family names in New Orleans and Plaquemine Parrish.

Although I cook rice for a few cajun dishes, such as jambalaya and Gumbo, which become naturally salty from the celery and sausage, I learned to cook rice from a Japanese lady while I was in the Marianas Islands. Most oriental rice dishes include soy or hoisin sauce, which have a lot of sodium, removing the need for any additional salt.

Did you know that one stalk of celery contains approx. 1/2 teaspoon of salt? Celery salt is not salt added to celery flavoring, but the salt removed directly from celery. Celery, which is part of the "Holy Trinity" of onion, bell pepper and celery replaces the need for any added table salt for my dishes.
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Old 01-16-2010, 04:30 AM   #28
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Thanks! It's always nice to meet another cajun. :)

That's interesting... I'll keep that in mind about the extra salt. It's good to keep an eye on your sodium intake. And I love salt, and seasonings, so cutting it out of the rice probably would help and wouldn't change the flavor much.

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Originally Posted by Selkie View Post
I'm a Cajun also... so welcome to DC! English was a second language to my grandmother and my mother. Navarre and Savoy are family names in New Orleans and Plaquemine Parrish.

Although I cook rice for a few cajun dishes, such as jambalaya and Gumbo, which become naturally salty from the celery and sausage, I learned to cook rice from a Japanese lady while I was in the Marianas Islands. Most oriental rice dishes include soy or hoisin sauce, which have a lot of sodium, removing the need for any additional salt.

Did you know that one stalk of celery contains approx. 1/2 teaspoon of salt? Celery salt is not salt added to celery flavoring, but the salt removed directly from celery. Celery, which is part of the "Holy Trinity" of onion, bell pepper and celery replaces the need for any added table salt for my dishes.
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Old 01-16-2010, 05:07 AM   #29
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You cook rice in the MW for 20 minutes?
it takes water alot longer to come to a boil in a microwave than if you put it on the stove.
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Old 06-30-2010, 03:19 PM   #30
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Hey guys! Its been quite a while since I've been on here because of school and stuff. I stopped experimenting in the kitchen for a while but now that I'm off school I can't wait to get back at it. I just wanna say that I really appreciate all of your posts because they have helped encourage me to get back up there. So, although I have very little experience when it comes to cooking, I really aspire to be a damn good cook one day. I imagine it'll take some years because I don't have anyone to learn from and can't afford classes. Its just me teaching myself and learning from the internet and books. I really suck at the moment but I did try some things on my own and I thought I'd share them with you guys.









The cake is pretty messy but it did taste quite good. Its an oreo ice cream cake and I got the recipe from here lol I laugh when I compare the pictures but oh well, it tasted good. The rest of the recipes I just made up myself. I've been told that experiments aren't meant for beginners, and it makes sense, but I just kinda jumped right in when I first started. I made these months ago, so yeah. I just didn't get the chance to show you guys. I've been trying to take things slow and go by the book lately though.

The last one I remember cutting off the skin and it was hard because I had to cut out the bone in the middle first. It was a long and tedious process. I imagine experienced cooks would do it real quickly. I took really long with that, and it turned out to be just okay. I don't think I'd ever go through all that again for a just okay chicken. Uhhh, the one before that was alright. I didn't like the tomatoes much and probably could've did the potatoes better lol well I tried. I like the shrimp and asparagus most, you might not be able to see the shrimp though since its under everything.

Its all a learning experience!
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