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Old 06-30-2010, 03:51 PM   #31
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Originally Posted by wanna be View Post
Rice is a real pain .I have been useing a pressure cooker with good results.My rice was allways gummy and as you said no amount of seasoning or liquid could save this mess.You only need a basic pressure cooker, and it's alot more usefull than a rice cooker.
Whats the difference between a pressure cooker and a rice cooker? For those of you who asked, I have never used a rice cooker in my life.
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Old 06-30-2010, 04:09 PM   #32
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A pressure cooker has a lid that affixes in such a way to cause the pressure to build inside the pot. A rice cooker is simply a counter top device that is somewhat automatic (mine has a spring, must have to do with weight or something), put in the rice, the required amount of water or broth, and it takes over. The lid is simply a lid, like on a slow cooker, nothing special (except for a steam hole, which many lids for saucepans have as well).
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Old 06-30-2010, 06:54 PM   #33
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Originally Posted by Wyogal View Post
A pressure cooker has a lid that affixes in such a way to cause the pressure to build inside the pot. A rice cooker is simply a counter top device that is somewhat automatic (mine has a spring, must have to do with weight or something), put in the rice, the required amount of water or broth, and it takes over. The lid is simply a lid, like on a slow cooker, nothing special (except for a steam hole, which many lids for saucepans have as well).

that is what i use too. however, last night made Jasmin rice and it sucked big time. gummy and sticky. i put in to much water, just not paying attention , i guess. i never remember from time to time, just what i did. always a c-- shoot. when it is good it is very good and when it's not it is still eatable. i never serve rice to company cause of never knowing how it will turn out. my daughter does it on stove-top and it is always perfect. should ask how she does it. i used to do in micro and that was fairly good all the time. why i changed i don't know.
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Old 06-30-2010, 10:22 PM   #34
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I have always made it on top of the stove, but last year I bought a rice cooker for my son to use at his apartment in college. He didn't use it at all, so I claimed it. I find that the white rice gets a bit sticky, so will probably use a bit less water next time. It's perfect for brown rice. I like it because I can set it and fuggetaboutit...
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Old 07-01-2010, 12:20 AM   #35
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I have been using my newish rice cooker a lot, which surprises me. I guess I didn't eat more rice because it didn't always turn out perfect. It does now. I got one of those Sanyo computerized things that cooks all kinds of rice all kinds of ways. Funny, it's a kitchen appliance I thought was silly until I used one.
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Old 07-01-2010, 02:17 AM   #36
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For regular long grain rice, I cook it in the oven. 1 part rice, 2 parts boiling water, put in casserole dish with a tight fitting lid, cook in a pre-heated 350 degree oven 25-30 minutes. Let for about 5 minutes, uncover and fluff. Comes out perfect every time.
I made Jasmine rice for the first time the other day, the directions called for 1 part rice and 1 and 1/2 liquid. I used 1 and 1/2 and it turned out perfect. I cooked it on the stove.
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Old 08-21-2010, 11:52 AM   #37
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My rice cooker is my best friend. I, like you can not master rice on my own so I put my faith in the good ol' rice cooker. Best $15 bucks spent!
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Old 08-21-2010, 03:38 PM   #38
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Hello...I have just accepted the fact that I can't cook and it is not something that comes natural to me.
It will, soon. Really, the secret of cooking rice is letting it mind its own business in a nice, cosy, steamy environment, so first line your saucepan lid with aluminium foil scrunched up round the edges before putting the lid on.

Follow my instructions exactly. Really, it’s very easy. I promise.

Rinse the rice in a sieve and soak it in a bowl of cold water for half an hour. This allows the boat-shaped grains to elongate elegantly. Cook un-soaked rice in boiling water and it will split.

Measure the rice by volume -rather than weight- before soaking it and then use one and one third the volume of liquid to cook the rice:

12floz/340ml rice needs 16floz/450ml stock or water.

This means that the rice will absorb all the flavour from your chosen liquid and any spices added during cooking. Next, season the liquid.

Bring the pan to the boil, then bung the lid on.

Boil for a couple of seconds, then reduce the heat to the minimum and cook for 20-25 minutes.

Cook for 20 minutes, resisting the temptation to lift the lid and check. No peeking! Or I vill lock you up in ze larder.

Using either method, when the time is up the rice will be cooked and all the water absorbed. If it has stuck a bit at the bottom, then just scoop the rice from the top. Or, if the bottom is lightly browned and crunchy-chewy then brazen it out and serve it up, calling it “Persian rice”.
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Old 08-21-2010, 05:51 PM   #39
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I had the same problem until my freinds Japanese wife
told me to get a Japanese (Zojirushi brand) rice cooker.
I have been using for about ten years now. Makes perfect rice everytime.

Sometimes I will substitute 1 cup water for a whole can of coconut milk and add some dried cranberries and raisins etc. for a thai inspired dish.This should be a little musshy (creamy).
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Old 08-21-2010, 09:02 PM   #40
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Originally Posted by Linux View Post
It will, soon. Really, the secret of cooking rice is letting it mind its own business in a nice, cosy, steamy environment, so first line your saucepan lid with aluminium foil scrunched up round the edges before putting the lid on.

Follow my instructions exactly. Really, it’s very easy. I promise.

Rinse the rice in a sieve and soak it in a bowl of cold water for half an hour. This allows the boat-shaped grains to elongate elegantly. Cook un-soaked rice in boiling water and it will split.

Measure the rice by volume -rather than weight- before soaking it and then use one and one third the volume of liquid to cook the rice:

12floz/340ml rice needs 16floz/450ml stock or water.

This means that the rice will absorb all the flavour from your chosen liquid and any spices added during cooking. Next, season the liquid.

Bring the pan to the boil, then bung the lid on.

Boil for a couple of seconds, then reduce the heat to the minimum and cook for 20-25 minutes.

Cook for 20 minutes, resisting the temptation to lift the lid and check. No peeking! Or I vill lock you up in ze larder.

Using either method, when the time is up the rice will be cooked and all the water absorbed. If it has stuck a bit at the bottom, then just scoop the rice from the top. Or, if the bottom is lightly browned and crunchy-chewy then brazen it out and serve it up, calling it “Persian rice”.
When the rice is cooked turn the heat off and leave a tightly
closed lid on the pot for 10 minutes---the rice will absorb all remaining
liguid and will not not be all stuck together.
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