"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Pasta, Rice, Beans, Grains...
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 04-30-2007, 05:52 PM   #41
Executive Chef
 
Dina's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Mission, Texas
Posts: 2,686
Send a message via Yahoo to Dina
I like mine with butter and a bit of honey.
__________________

__________________
Dina
If you have much, give of your wealth. If you have little, give of your heart. - Arab proverb
Dina is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2007, 07:12 PM   #42
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Raton,NM, USA
Posts: 4,573
Regular yellow corn meal does not make grits it makes corn bread,johnny cakes and polenta which can be cooked soft like grits,grits are made from hominy it's white and is cooked to make a type of porridge and I have never heard of grits or hominy bread.
__________________

__________________
jpmcgrew is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2007, 05:26 PM   #43
Chef Extraordinaire
 
mudbug's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: NoVA, beyond the Beltway
Posts: 11,166
I always think of grits as the white icky stuff and corn meal as the wonderful golden stuff.
__________________
Kool Aid - Think before you drink.
mudbug is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2007, 08:52 PM   #44
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: SE Pennsylvania
Posts: 4,655
for a dinner item baked garlic cheese grits are awesome...a soufle really!

for breakfast I likethem natural with my fried eggs and sausage etc. I prefer them to most potato breakfast items.
__________________
Robo410 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2007, 10:33 PM   #45
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Texas
Posts: 5,296
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Bob
Miss Sattie

Check out post # 9 in this thread. Look in your grocery store in the hot cerel section. Oatmeal, Cream of Wheat, etc. Leave the "instant' stuff on the shelf!!
I have looked there (cereal section) in every store I go to, all I find is the instant stuff by that Quaker dude. I really want to see/experience the difference between instant and the real deal because I am quite sure all I have ever had is instant!!!
__________________
sattie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2007, 12:04 AM   #46
Chef Extraordinaire
 
kitchenelf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 19,725
Send a message via MSN to kitchenelf
Regular grits have the germ removed, stone ground grits do not, which is why mudbug thinks she's chewing soggy popcorn . Mudbug - you just like a finer grind. They have a much clumpier/more course texture. I do believe that is what Uncle Bob was referring to.....maybe?

Grits are a coarser grind of white cornmeal while cornmeal for cornbread is a finer grind.

Sattie - don't confuse instant grits and the quick cooking grits. You will enjoy the quick cooking grits just fine. Instant grits have a preservative type taste and the quick cooking just doesn't take much longer = we're talking 10 minutes here.
__________________
kitchenelf

"Count yourself...you ain't so many" - quote from Buck's Daddy
kitchenelf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2007, 08:42 AM   #47
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Uncle Bob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Small Town Mississippi
Posts: 17,392
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Bob
Hominy Grits are a gift to us from the American Indians. Hominy is dried white or yellow corn (maize) kernels from which the hull and germ have been removed. This can be done mechanically or chemically by soaking in lye water. Today mechanical removal is the method of choice. When the hominy is ground it is called hominy grits.
99% of what you see in modern grocery stores is Hominy Grits. Quaker “Quick” grits say ready in 5 minutes. 20 to 30 minutes is better!

Stone ground grits (my favorite and simply stated) are made from grinding whole corn kernels which is sifted extracting meal etc. The tiny particles that are two large to go into the meal are grits. These grits contain the “germ” of the corn. Which in IMHO give them a better (corn) flavor and are more nutritious. They are generally simmered with milk and/or water until very creamy, smooth and thick. In my part of the world they are primary served with a plethora of breakfast foods. Served with butter, red-eye gravy etc. Grits can be chilled, cut into squares and fried in butter. Sometimes cheese is added. Shrimp and grits is a fantastic and delicious dish from the Carolinas. Yum! Stone ground may be hard to find outside of the south but can be ordered over the Internet.

Instant grits are pre-cooked and dried for packaging. They cook very quickly and are not fit for human consumption. Trust me Ok?
GRITS - A celebration of Southern cooking and kitchen traditions This link describes the method to produce "stone ground grits"

Good Hominy Grits This one explains "hominy grits'

Hope this helps! And I betcha can't eat just one! Ha!
__________________
There is only one Quality worse than Hardness of Heart, and that is Softness of Head.

Kool-Aid...Think Before You Drink
Uncle Bob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2007, 04:44 PM   #48
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Greater Annapolis MD Area
Posts: 257
Alix grits are simular to Cream of Wheat or Ralston when first cooked, except that it tastes like corn, if you let it cool it will harden like what you make for your father. I hope that clears it up a little for you.
__________________
Elf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2007, 02:27 PM   #49
Master Chef
 
SierraCook's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Sierra Valley, Northern California, USA
Posts: 5,580
Thumbs up Grits are OK!!

I have had grits once and they were pretty darn good. A friend of mine bought shrimp and grits to a potluck/party. It would eat them again, if I had the chance. Someone else bought collard greens to the same potluck and I cannot say that I liked them.
__________________
Do what you can, with what you have, where you are.

Theodore Roosevelt
26th president of US (1858 - 1919)
SierraCook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2007, 02:48 PM   #50
Sous Chef
 
SurvivorGirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Canada Eh! {Muahaha! ;)}
Posts: 861
I'v never used grits, are they similar to cooked polenta?
thx!
__________________

__________________
It's laisez-faire, I don't even give a care.
Let's make Friday part of the weekend and give every new baby a chocolate eclair.

Live Strong
SurvivorGirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:55 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.