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Old 06-12-2007, 03:41 AM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lancas
thanks for all the replies
I'll certainly have to give pbutter a try.

My question was prompted because I will be living on a sailboat in the tropics. (over 80 most of the time, and no air).I made the assumption that tahini would not keep well under these circumstances.
Maybe that's wrong, and it will keep well in the heat, in which case, I should probably be ok.
Another consideration on a boat, though, is that storage space is at a big premium, so if I can have a product do more than one job, it gets the space. As far as I know, there is not much else to do with tahini, is there?

liz
As difficult as the condition you described may be for food preservation, you have far greater chances with tahini than with hummus. When you make hummus, you must eat it right away or it will become sour in the space of a few hours. Tahini on the other hand will only become rancid after some time. Under the conditions you described, this time for tahini should be a number of weeks after you open the jar. In any case, it is easy to tell when something has gone rancid and it is time to feed the fish with it.

You can also eat tahini straight or spread on bread alone or with honey. It is a very substantial food and very healthy too.
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Old 06-12-2007, 07:43 AM   #22
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Originally Posted by velochic
My dh loves this recipe, and he's Middle Eastern. I got it from an old friend in the US, so it's not a recipe I got from the in-laws and lit's ess than authenic. Still, it's very good. You might try it if you don't want to mess with griding the sesame paste yourself.

15 oz. can garbanzo beans
8 scallions, chopped coarsely, white parts only
1/4c. fresh lemon juice
1/4c. extra virgin olive oil
1 t. cumin
1 t. coriander
1/8 t. cayenne pepper
6 cloves garlic, chopped coarsely

Whiz it all in a blender, adding small amount of olive oil if it needs to be thinned. If you are not a garlic lover, you'd definitely want to lessen the garlic... it's very garlicky.

This looks great!!......some of my favorite spices.......and I have everything in stock.

The thing for me about tahini, besides not having it available locally, is that I keep a large quanity of peanut butter on hand. To order it online, for me, would be like hopping in the car to drive an hour to purchase one item....not in character for me. I also stock untoasted sesame seeds and am not likely to toast, grind, clean, scrape..... The peanut butter option is just fine by me, and now this recipe that calls for neither....perfect....
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Old 06-12-2007, 07:55 AM   #23
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If it's not made with tahini, it's not hummus, as good as it may taste with peanut butter. Just my opinion. the last recipe offered, sounds very good, though.
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Old 06-12-2007, 10:55 AM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by boufa06
As difficult as the condition you described may be for food preservation, you have far greater chances with tahini than with hummus. When you make hummus, you must eat it right away or it will become sour in the space of a few hours. Tahini on the other hand will only become rancid after some time. Under the conditions you described, this time for tahini should be a number of weeks after you open the jar. In any case, it is easy to tell when something has gone rancid and it is time to feed the fish with it.

You can also eat tahini straight or spread on bread alone or with honey. It is a very substantial food and very healthy too.
Thanks! - that's good to know - a way longer shelf life than I would have thought under those conditions. Maybe I"ll try that route then (as opposed to taking the seeds and grinding them as needed - they would go rancid too I'd assume)

Great alternative recipe! I'll have to give that a try

thanks everyone for the great input
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Old 06-12-2007, 10:59 AM   #25
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Originally Posted by lyndalou
If it's not made with tahini, it's not hummus
Actually hummus is the Arabic word for chickpea. In the Middle East, there are as many ways to make hummus as their are hands to make it, it seems. My dh's mother made it completely different than his father's sister. They were from different parts of Turkey. And it gets even more different from country to country. I know his sister doesn't use tahini and drizzles olive oil over hers with one of the green leafy herbs (cilantro maybe) to garnish. They still call it hummus.
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Old 06-14-2007, 06:48 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by callie
What else, Green Lady? Sesame seeds and.....?
TIA
Sorry for the delayed relpy. I was out of town for a few days.

Yes, just the sesame seeds in a high-powered blender. Raw sesame seeds makes raw tahini. Then add the other ingredients to make the hummus. Let me know how it turns out.
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Old 06-14-2007, 07:19 PM   #27
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Ive found tahini at some Walmarts where they carry some jewish food products like Matzo Crackers and potato pancake mix it comes in a can more than you will usually use I would think you could freeze the rest.
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Old 07-02-2007, 07:44 AM   #28
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I often make it without tahini, not because I cannot get it, but because I have to buy a whole jar when I only need a little of it. Instead I throw some toasted sesame seeds into the mix, and some sesame seed oil (the Asian type) when I'm blending it. It probably isn't "authentic", but it will have to do. It breaks my heart to have to throw away food, and for some reason tahini only comes in jars so large that I throw half of it away. Oh, well.
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Old 07-02-2007, 07:55 AM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Claire
I often make it without tahini, not because I cannot get it, but because I have to buy a whole jar when I only need a little of it. Instead I throw some toasted sesame seeds into the mix, and some sesame seed oil (the Asian type) when I'm blending it. It probably isn't "authentic", but it will have to do. It breaks my heart to have to throw away food, and for some reason tahini only comes in jars so large that I throw half of it away. Oh, well.
If you used 4-6 teaspoons of tahini per 14 oz. of vinegar and olive oil based salad dressings you might not have to throw your unused tahini away.
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Old 07-03-2007, 07:35 AM   #30
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4-6 teaspoons still leaves a heck of a lot of tahini. I have the seeds and oil on hand, and use them regularly, so that works.
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